DIG IT is a conversation text written on the occasion of the exhibition situation with the same title at Hordaland Art Centre, May-June 2009. Co-curated and -written with Linus Elmes.

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

Linus:

I think we should change the world, and hope you don’t think that is a too ambitious goal... We have to start to think about the reasons for exhibition production. You know how we go about this. See exhibitions, read texts, go to seminars and make studio visits. Why don’t we forget about that for a moment? I just read Aldous Huxley last night. He writes: Art, I suppose, is only for beginners, or else for those resolute dead-enders, who have made up their minds to be content with the ersatz of Suchness, with symbols rather than with what they signify, with the elegantly composed recipe in lieu of actual dinner.
My suggestion is that we don’t care about the recipe this time, if you excuse the metaphor. I am thinking of a number of works I have bumped into during the last few years, by Ylva Ogland’s father, Tova Mozard’s father and a painting in Andres Widoff’s studio. They are all fantastic works which have had tremendous impact, but remain unknown to a larger audience. I have spoken to a few other artists too, to ask if they too have works of similar importance and have received some wonderful responses. This is what Po Hagstöm writes:

About the village which didn’t care about art, and about the artist who kept painting.

Paul Cseplö came to Jämtland as a child, when his family fled from the war in Hungary. He was fascinated by the landscape and started to paint. He was not affected by the fact that the people of the village didn’t care about art, and in my childhood Paul was the only artist in the village. Paul’s answer to the fact that no one was willing to pay for culture, was to paint. These days there is a painting by Paul in every home. There are paintings in the pizza shop, the boat house, on the caravans and in the old people’s home. He painted the stage in the community house, the walls around the public dance floor and the walls of the big halls of the school. He was almost never paid, and only very seldom did someone want reimburse him for the paint. Sometimes he was not even paid respect.

Paul kept painting his whole life. When I visited him at the hospital in his last days he was painting a small forest lake on the hospital wall, with intravenous in his arm. The previous year his brother had died of leukemia and he had himself been fighting cancer for several years. My father was sad to hear about Paul’s coming death, but Paul just laughed: “Don’t be sad, why don’t you join me?” According to Paul nothing disappears, it just transforms.

Paul died in 2008 of leukemia .He was one of the best people I have ever met. And even though he might be right in saying that nothing disappears, the world is poorer without him.

The most interesting question to ask in relation to art is “what does it do?” Paul’s art changed a community. His actions have made it impossible to go around my village without encountering art. Is it possible for the people living there not to be affected? I don’t know. Do I think they deserve these works? Absolutely not. But Paul never distrusted the value of art or the strength of its presence. And his choice to distribute art is to me an all encompassing position when I act as an artist/curator.

Anne:

Change the world, why not? In many ways that is exactly what these works already have done. They have been feeding artists and their art works. And I agree, let’s leave behind the frame we usually operate within. For instance, what does it mean to create an exhibition situation, over an exhibition? I think that by creating a situation a space opens for relations and meetings different to the exhibition space. I am not necessarily talking about a social situation, but situations between the work and the viewer. We are inviting the public into a room of documentation, where we through examples document and acknowledge the private meetings these works have provoked. These are not elevated world known works, and we might not even want them to become that? These are works almost no one can know before they see them in this exact situation. I say almost, because of course they are extremely well know to some. And I guess that is where I want us to go. I want to look at the works and appreciate them in the exhibition room, but I also want to move further and think through what is usually not discussed within this frame. For instance I could approach the word inspiration. Or we could claim, like Po’s story indicates, that these works might create attitudes or alternatives we don’t encounter many places in society other than in art; the speechless activity, in the right sense of the word, and the activity without direction.

You are going to the country side with Ellen Jakobsson Strømsø’s father in a few days, to document and bring her contribution to this situation. When I hear her speak about her father I gradually realise who she is and why she creates what she does. The story of him as a member of the Art Council of Stockholm, where he consistently recommends the young female artist with the shortest cv to do public art commissions, expresses an attitude to society we can trace in his daughter’s work. To use another metaphor, since we both like them so much; by creating this situation we are creating a back stage traversing space and time.

Linus:

I have come to think of the individual works as subjects. The principles of selection are based on an interpersonal perspective, as if I was positioned in relation to an object, in the sense of an individual, rather than an art object. This is a position which undermines both discursive and rational interpretations, but instead force us one step closer to the Suchness which Huxley speaks of. Both the institutional and economical logic in the art world is based on track record and the idea of the oeuvre. This is what actually regulates value in economic terms but also in significance. The value is created and re-created through the surrounding text. Criticism, reproductions and our own communication such as this very text you are reading right, now helps to upkeep a certain order. When it comes to: change the world, I suggest we see that as having the tools to change the situation we create. In this case we do it through compiling this project in a mode that does not consider the length of any CV, just as little as Ellen Jakobsson Strømsø’s father considers it in any way. Anders Widoff writes: Millan and I must at some point have walked through the same dream. How else can it be explained that that this painting evokes so many memories? Moreover, I think that the painting seems to emerge as moisture and mold from the base. It seems almost as unpainted.

Anne:

That is why it is important to meet the works. Meet them and figure out how they affect, it they affect, and then try to describe that meeting. This way we can contribute to new thoughts about art, and with an attitude to display something not displayed before. This is something the institutional and economic art world has had to face in this globalised world. Because, at the same time as we have few tools to handle these works within the institutional circuit, we cannot apply our tools to art and visual expressions form other parts of the world without possibly abusing them. To let art exist in its own right for a while, without the evaluating “system” is a liberating thought, as well as necessary. Because it is not our task to dignify the contemporary at the same time as the contemporary happens. We cannot create a map of a terrain which doesn’t exist yet, we can at best make a weather prediction. Once again I turn to the exhibition vs. the exhibition situation. It might not be about changing the world we already know, as much as it is about changing the consciousness about the world about to be created. In this case the consciousness about the framework.

Linus:

In this case I think of the exhibition situation as visiting a dear friend, when you sit together in the kitchen or maybe on her bedside. You talk intimately about things; mutual experiences and shared secrets. Maybe you lightly touch each other’s hands.

Mikael Lundberg explains his relation to the Venetian portrait of the woman very straight forward:

it’s bought in venice, late 80’s when i lived there with katrin for 5 years, we even got married there, i saw it in the window of a restorer and bought it, i wanted it since it represented both katrin and venice, 2 factors that had an amazing impact on me and my artwork.

His words are liberated from rhetorical figures, academic alibis and worries. It is the explanation to why this is a work that means something, and that is the explanation to why it is included in our exhibition.

Anne:

This makes me think about the difference between interaction and staying in touch. It is easy to stay in touch with the help of something which replaces the format of conversation, nudge, kudos, sms. All three kinds of attention are pleasant, but can never really replace the conversation. Yet, we know that we don’t necessarily have to be close to the one we have a conversation with. Tønnes Omdal’s painting which has been hanging in the living room of Sveinung Rudjord Unneland’s grandparents, for instance, has been conversing quietly from the past for many years already. It keeps conversing, both with Sveinung and us. This work is important to the family, and Sveinung writes:

Tønnes Omdal (1920-80) worked all his life at Lista, except his years as a student at SHKS and The Art Academy in Oslo. At Lista he ran a small farm on the side of his activity as a painter. The work in this exhibition situation is owned by my grandparents, and has its reserved space above the sofa in their living room.

My grandother has told me many times that Omdal claimed it to be the pest painting he ever painted. I have often wondered if this was something he told everyone who wanted to buy his works, or if this was in a class of its own. It depicts a harsh weathered landscape, like I know it from Lista where I grew up. As a kid I could not see what the image portrayed or why it was supposed to be so good.

I often find it difficult to believe in art. Maybe that difficulty is similar to my doubt that chaotic colour fields could represent a landscape. When I look at the image today, I wonder how something as everyday as a changing sky above a landscape can be so much more. It’s as if this study of nature from the Seventies depicts something entirely different, like the emptiness after hours in front of the TV or the powerlessness after fifteen million hits on the internet. And I thought I had to make a noisy multimedia installation!

Linus:

It is a question of critical moments, maybe even a psychoanalytic process. It is a collection of points of references and informal historical objects that have shaped individuals. I will end with Tova Mozard’s text about the work that named this project. She writes:

The artwork I named “Dig it” is an old spade with the words DIG IT written in silver text on the blade.

The work was made in the Eighties by my father Lars Westin. Lars was born 1955 in Ystad and died in 1993 in Thailand. He was found in a hotel room. The vague and negligent written abduction report mentioned cardiac arrest as a result of an overdose as the cause of death.

Lars was an artist but lacked adequate education and he never had much of a career. He went to an art program at Östra Grevie 1973-1975, he made drawings, paintings, collages and assembled objects. He was interested in craft, Arnold Böcklin, surrealism and symbolism.

To re-activate and re-use things was something magic to him, he said it was important to be surrounded by things which were rooted in the souls of humans, that this established a certain contact. He collected human hair, jewels, junk, chains, textiles and toys. He assembled this to shamanistic objects and three-dimensional images or he just used it to pimp lamps, mirrors and carpets. He talked about making “things glow” and was interested in occultism. To him art was a state of mind rather than something fixed.

He was the kind of artist who claimed not to stand the light of day, he stayed up all night, painting to the soundtrack of Captain Beefheart and Greatful Dead. He loved the aroma of wet paint and dissolving agent.

When I was a child and visited my dad in Lund, we used to sit on the floor of his two-room apartment and listen to Elvis Presley and draw. I was allowed to draw directly on his oriental carpet, according to him it was a way to communicate with all the symbols woven into the carpets. I remember the luxurious feeling of using his silver and golden pens, I had to pump the ink through by pushing the edge against the paper until it shaped a dazzling, metallic spot. After Lars die, I inherited many of his things. The spade was one of them. I was thirteen the, and I remember how cool I thought it was. I kept it in my room and when I moved I brought it with me.

What makes it so powerful is its simplicity and the humorous form of a readymade. I can see his cynical world-view and his black humour reflected in it. Lars talked a lot about death and the process of dying. For me the spade has become a symbol of the effort it is to live. To dig where you stand or digging your own grave, that is the question.

DIG IT er en samtaletekst skrevet i forbindelse med utstillingssituasjonen med samme navn.

Linus:

Jag tycker vi skall förändra världen, hoppas du inte tycker det är en alltför ambitiös målsättning ...Vi måste börja med att tänka om grunderna för utställningsproduktion. Du vet hur vi håller på. Ser utställningar, läser texter, går på seminarier och gör ateljébesök. Kan vi inte glömma allt det där för ett slag?

Jag läste förresten Aldous Huxley igår. Han skriver: Konsten är, antar jag, bara för nybörjare eller sådana helhjärtade slöfockar som en gång för alla beslutat nöja sig med surrogat för Sådantvarandet. De bryr sig mer om symbolerna än deras betydelse, de fäster sig mera vid det elegant komponerade receptet än vid själva måltiden.

Mitt förslag är att vi struntar i receptet den här gången om du tillåter metaforiken. Jag tänker på ett antal verk jag stött på genom åren, av Ylva Oglands pappa, Tova Mozards pappa och en målning som hänger i Anders Widoffs ateljé. De är alla fantastiska verk som haft stor betydelse men som är okända för en bredare publik.

Jag har talat med några andra konstnärer också för att undersöka om de har verk med motsvarande betydelse och fått fantastiska svar. Så här skriver Po Hagström:

Om byn som inte brydde sig om konst, och om konstnären som målade ändå.

Paul Cseplö kom till Jämtland som barn när hans familj flydde undan kriget i Ungern. Han fascinerades av det nya landskapet och snart började han måla. Att folk i trakten misstrodde konst påverkade honom inte och när jag växte upp var Paul byns enda konstnär.Man värderar fortfarande inte konst i vår by. Men Pauls svar på att ingen vill betala för kultur var att han målade ändå. Numera finns Pauls måleri i vartannat hem i byn. Det finns i pizzerian, i båthus, på husbilar och på ålderdomshemmet. Han har målat scenen på hembygdsgården, fonden till dansbanan och de stora salarna i gamla skolan. Han fick nästan aldrig betalt och bara sällan ville någon ersätta honom för färgen. Ibland visades han inte ens tacksamhet.

Paul fortsatte måla hela livet. När jag besökte honom på sjukhuset under hans sista tid stod han med dropp i armen och målade en skogstjärn på sjukhusväggen. Åren innan hade både hans mamma och ena bror dött i leukemi och själv hade han kämpat mot cancer i flera år. Pappa blev ledsen när Pauls förestående död kom på tal, men Paul bara skrattade: ”Var inte ledsen, du kan väl följa med?” Enligt Paul försvinner ingenting, det bara övergår i något nytt.

2008 dog Paul i leukemi. Han var en av de bästa människor jag någonsin mött. Och även om han har rätt i att inget någonsin försvinner, så är världen sämre nu när han lämnat oss.

Den mest intressanta fråga man kan ställa om konst, är vad den gör. Pauls konst har förändrat ett samhälle. Hans gärning har gjort det omöjligt att vistas i min by utan att man konfronteras med konst. Kan de som bor där undgå att påverkas av detta? Jag vet inte. Tycker jag att de förtjänar all denna konst? Absolut inte. Men Paul tvivlade aldrig på konstens värde eller på styrkan i dess närvaro. Och hans val att sprida konst är en ständigt närvarande position när jag själv agerar som konstnär/curator.

Anne:

Forandre verden, du, ja hvorfor ikke? På mange måter er det det disse verkene allerede har gjort. De har sådd frø hos kunstnerne og vært med å påvirke deres kunstnerskap. Og jeg er enig, la oss legge til side rammene vi vanligvis opererer innenfor. Hva vil det for eksempel si å lage en utstillingssituasjon, mer enn en utstilling? Jeg tror at ved å skape en situasjon mer enn en utstilling så åpnes det opp for relasjoner og møter på en annen måte enn i en utstilling. Og da snakker jeg ikke nødvendigvis om sosiale situasjoner, men om situasjoner mellom verk og betrakter. For vi inviterer inn i et dokumentasjonsrom, et rom der vi gjennom eksempler dokumenterer og anerkjenner de private møtene som har oppstått med arbeidene vi viser. Dette er ikke opphøyde verk som er verdenskjent, og vi vil kanskje heller ikke at de skal bli det? Det er verk som neste ingen kan vite hvordan ser ut før de ser dem i denne situasjonen. Jeg sier nesten, for det er klart at de er uhyre velkjent for noen. Og det er vel litt i den retningen jeg vil ta oss. Jeg vil se på verkene og verdsette dem for det de er i utstillingsrommet, men så vil jeg bevege meg videre og tenke over ting som vanligvis ikke blir diskutert i den vante rammen. For eksempel kan jeg nærme meg ordet inspirasjon. Eller så kan vi, som historien over til Po indikerer; påstå at disse verkene skaper holdninger eller alternativer vi ikke ser så mange andre steder i samfunnet enn i kunsten. Den målløse, i ordets begge betydninger, aktiviteten. Målløs både i ikkeverbal form, men også målløs som i retningsløs.

Du skal jo ut på landet med kunstneren Ellen Jakobsson Strømsøs far om noen dager, for å dokumentere og ta med deg hennes bidrag til denne kabalen. Og når jeg hører hennes beskrivelse av sin egen far så forstår jeg mer av hvem hun er, og hvorfor hun skaper slik hun gjør. Historien om ham som medlem i Stockholms Konstråd der han konsekvent anbefaler den unge kvinnelige kunstneren med kortes cv til kunst i offentlig rom-oppdrag uttrykker en holdning til samfunnet vi kan se i hans datters arbeid. Hvis man skal bruke en lignelse, som vi begge liker så godt, så skaper vi et med denne utstillingssituasjonen slags back stage som krysser både tid og rom.

Linus:

Jag har alltmer kommit att tänka på de enskilda verken som ett subjekt. Urvalskriteriet blir ett interpersonellt perspektiv, som om jag stod i relation till ett objekt i betydelsen individ snarare än konstobjekt. Det är ett ställningstagande som drivet till sin spets strävar efter att underminera diskursiva och rationella positioner men som också innebär att vi tar steget närmare det Sådantvarande som Huxley talar om.

Både den institutionella och ekonomiska logiken i konstvärden fungerar ut-ifrån track record och idéen om konstnärens oeuvre. Det är alltså det som reglerar värde, både i ekonomiska termer och i form av betydelse. Värde-skapandet regleras genom en rad mekanismer som vi känner igen som den omgivande texten. Kritik, reproduktioner och vår egen kommunikation, exempelvis texter som den här, som du just läser hjälper till att upprätthålla en given ordning.

När jag säger ”förändra världen” menar jag att vi har verktygen att förändra den ”situation” vi skapar. Det gör vi genom att sammanställa den här ut-ställningen enligt en princip som lika lite som Ellen Jakobsson Strømsøs far tar hänsyn till längden på en eller annan CV. Anders Widoff skriver: Millan och jag måste någon gång ha vandrat i samma dröm. Hur ska jag annars förklara att målningen väcker så många minnen? Dessutom tycker jag om att målningen tycks växa fram som fukt och mögel ur underlaget. Den framstår närmast som omålad.

Anne:

Det er derfor det er viktig å møte verkene. Møte dem og finne ut hvordan de påvirker, om de påvirker, og deretter prøve å beskrive dette møtet. Slik kan vi være med på å skape noe nytt. En ny tenkning rundt kunst. Og en ny holdning til det som tidligere ikke er vist. Det er også noe den institusjonelle og økonomiske kunstverden du beskriver over har måtte føle på i denne globaliserte verden. For like lite som vi har kjente verktøy å bruke for å plassere disse verkene inn i det institusjonelle, kan vi bruke våre verktøy på kunst og visuelle uttrykk fra andre deler av verden uten kanskje å overgripe oss. Det å la kunst få eksistere alene en liten stund, uten dette vurderende ”systemet” rundt er en befriende tanke. Og jeg tror nødvendig. For det er ikke vår oppgave å opphøye samtiden i det samtiden skjer. Vi kan ikke skape et kart over et terreng som ikke finnes enda, vi kan i beste fall lage en værvarsling. Og jeg vender igjen til utstillingen kontra utstillingssituasjonen. Det handler kanskje ikke om å forandre verden som vi allerede kjenner, så mye som det kan handle om å forandre bevisstheten om den verden som er i ferd med å komme. Bevisstheten om rammen til kunstverket, i det her tilfellet.

Linus:

Jag tänker mig utställningssituationen i det här fallet som ett besök hos en kär vän, när man sitter vid köksbordet, i soffan eller på sängkanten och talar förtroeligt om saker. Gemensamma upplevelser och delade hemligheter. Kanske nuddar man vid varrandras händer. Mikael Lundberg förklarar relationen till det venizianska kvinnoporträttet utan omsvep:
den e köpt i venedig i slutet av 80-talet då katrin o jag bodde där i 5 år, där vi oxå gifte oss, jag såg den i en restaurerares fönster o köpte den, jag ville ha den då den representerade både katrin o venedig, 2 faktorer som har haft en fantastisk betydelse på mig o min konst.

Det är en redogörelse befriad från retoriska figurer, akademiska alibin och ängslan. Det är förklaringen till varför det är ett verk som betyder något och det är förklaringen till varför det är med i vår utställning.

Anne:

Det får meg til å tenke på forskjellen mellom å interagere og holde kontakt. Det er veldig lett å holde kontakt gjennom noe som erstatter samtalen som format, nudge, kudos, sms. Alle tre former for oppmerksomhet er hyggelige, men de kan aldri helt erstatte det som er en samtale. Allikevel så vet vi at man ikke alltid trenger å være i nærheten av den man samtaler med. Tønnes Omdals maleri som har hengt hjemme hos besteforeldrene til Sveinung Rudjord Unneland, for eksempel, har talt i stillhet og fra fortiden i mange år allerede. Og fortsetter å tale, både til oss og til Sveinung. Verket har hatt stor betydning for familien. Sveinung skriver:

Tønnes Omdal (1920-80) virket hele sitt liv fra Lista, med unntak fra studieårene ved SHKS og Statens kunstakademiet i Oslo. På Lista drev han et lite småbruk ved siden av livet som kunstmaler. Kunstverket på denne utstillingssituasjonen eies av mine besteforeldre og har sin faste plass over sofaen i stuen deres. Mormor har mange ganger fortalt at Omdal selv mente at det var det beste bildet han noen gang hadde malt. Jeg har ofte lurt på om dette var noe han sa til alle som ønsket å kjøpe av han, eller om dette bildet var i særklasse. Bildet skildrer et værhardt landskap, slik jeg kjenner det fra Lista der jeg selv vokste opp. Som barn kunne jeg verken se hva bildet forestilte eller skjønne hvorfor det skulle være så bra.

Jeg syntes ofte det er vanskelig å tro på kunsten. Kanskje er vanskene lik den tvilen jeg en gang hadde om at kaotiske fargeflater kunne forestille et landskap. Når jeg ser på bildet i dag unders jeg over at noe så hverdagslig som en skiftende himmel over et landskap også gir så mye mer. Det er som om dette naturstudiet fra 70-tallet skildrer noe helt annet, som tomheten etter timer foran tv eller maktesløsheten etter femten millioner treff på internett. Og jeg som trodde jeg måtte lage en støyende multimediainstallasjon!

Linus:

Det är en fråga om avgörande ögonblick och kanske en psykoanalytisk process. Det är en samling av referenspunkter och informella historiska objekt som har format individer. Jag avslutar med Tova Mozards text om verket som gett namn åt det här projektet. Hon skriver:

Konstverket som jag har valt att ge titeln ”Dig it” är en gammal spade där texten DIG IT står skrivet med silverfärg på bladet.

Verket är gjort någon gång på åttitalet av min far Lars Westin. Lars föddes 1955 i Ystad och dog 1993 i Thailand. Man fann honom på ett hotellrum och de vaga och hafsigt skrivna obduktionspappren nämner hjärtstillestånd till följd av överdos som dödsorsak.

Lars var konstnär fast saknade högskoleutbildning och fick aldrig någon egentlig karriär. Han gick konstlinjen på Östra Grevie 1973-1975 och målade, tecknade gjorde collage och tillverkade objekt. Romantiken, surrealismen, symbolismen, Arnold Böcklin och konsthantverk intresserade honom.

Att återanvända saker var något magiskt för honom, han sa att det var viktigt att omge sig med ting som var förankrad i någons själ att det gav en slags kontakt. Han samlade på människohår, ädelstenar, skrot, kedjor, tyger och leksaker, dessa sattes ihop till schamanliknande objekt, tredimensionella bilder eller användes för att utsmycka lampor, speglar och mattor. Han pratade om konsten i att få “saker att lysa” och intresserade sig för det ockulta. Konsten skulle vara ett tillstånd snarare än något fixerat.

Han var den sortens konstnär som påstod sig inte tåla dagens ljus utan helst satt uppe hela nätterna och målade lyssnades på Captain Beefheart och Greatful Dead. Han älskade lukten av oljefärg och lösningsmedel.

När jag var liten och hälsade på pappa nere i Lund brukade vi sitta på golvet i hans lilla tvåa och lyssna på Elvis Presley och rita. Man fick rita direkt på hans orientaliska matta och enligt honom var det ett sätt att ingå i en kommunikation med all den symbolik som fanns invävt i mattorna. Jag kommer ihåg hur lyxigt det kändes att få rita med hans silver och guld pennor, man fick pumpa fram bläcket genom att trycka pennspetsen mot pappret tills det rann ut i en metallic skimrande pöl. Efter Lars död ärvde jag mycket av hans saker och däribland fanns spaden, jag var tretton år då och kommer ihåg att jag tyckte spaden var cool och att jag hade den i mitt rum. Den har hängt med sen dess.

Vad som gör spaden så bra är dess enkelhet i form och utförande, en ready made med humor. Jag tycker mig även se hans cyniska världsåskådning och svarta humor speglat i den. Lars pratade mycket om döden och processen dit, för mig symboliserar spaden arbetet som det innebär att leva. Att gräva där man står eller gräva sin egen grav, det är frågan.

DIG IT is a conversation text written on the occasion of the exhibition situation with the same title at Hordaland Art Centre, May-June 2009. Co-curated and -written with Linus Elmes.

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

Linus:

I think we should change the world, and hope you don’t think that is a too ambitious goal... We have to start to think about the reasons for exhibition production. You know how we go about this. See exhibitions, read texts, go to seminars and make studio visits. Why don’t we forget about that for a moment? I just read Aldous Huxley last night. He writes: Art, I suppose, is only for beginners, or else for those resolute dead-enders, who have made up their minds to be content with the ersatz of Suchness, with symbols rather than with what they signify, with the elegantly composed recipe in lieu of actual dinner.
My suggestion is that we don’t care about the recipe this time, if you excuse the metaphor. I am thinking of a number of works I have bumped into during the last few years, by Ylva Ogland’s father, Tova Mozard’s father and a painting in Andres Widoff’s studio. They are all fantastic works which have had tremendous impact, but remain unknown to a larger audience. I have spoken to a few other artists too, to ask if they too have works of similar importance and have received some wonderful responses. This is what Po Hagstöm writes:

About the village which didn’t care about art, and about the artist who kept painting.

Paul Cseplö came to Jämtland as a child, when his family fled from the war in Hungary. He was fascinated by the landscape and started to paint. He was not affected by the fact that the people of the village didn’t care about art, and in my childhood Paul was the only artist in the village. Paul’s answer to the fact that no one was willing to pay for culture, was to paint. These days there is a painting by Paul in every home. There are paintings in the pizza shop, the boat house, on the caravans and in the old people’s home. He painted the stage in the community house, the walls around the public dance floor and the walls of the big halls of the school. He was almost never paid, and only very seldom did someone want reimburse him for the paint. Sometimes he was not even paid respect.

Paul kept painting his whole life. When I visited him at the hospital in his last days he was painting a small forest lake on the hospital wall, with intravenous in his arm. The previous year his brother had died of leukemia and he had himself been fighting cancer for several years. My father was sad to hear about Paul’s coming death, but Paul just laughed: “Don’t be sad, why don’t you join me?” According to Paul nothing disappears, it just transforms.

Paul died in 2008 of leukemia .He was one of the best people I have ever met. And even though he might be right in saying that nothing disappears, the world is poorer without him.

The most interesting question to ask in relation to art is “what does it do?” Paul’s art changed a community. His actions have made it impossible to go around my village without encountering art. Is it possible for the people living there not to be affected? I don’t know. Do I think they deserve these works? Absolutely not. But Paul never distrusted the value of art or the strength of its presence. And his choice to distribute art is to me an all encompassing position when I act as an artist/curator.

Anne:

Change the world, why not? In many ways that is exactly what these works already have done. They have been feeding artists and their art works. And I agree, let’s leave behind the frame we usually operate within. For instance, what does it mean to create an exhibition situation, over an exhibition? I think that by creating a situation a space opens for relations and meetings different to the exhibition space. I am not necessarily talking about a social situation, but situations between the work and the viewer. We are inviting the public into a room of documentation, where we through examples document and acknowledge the private meetings these works have provoked. These are not elevated world known works, and we might not even want them to become that? These are works almost no one can know before they see them in this exact situation. I say almost, because of course they are extremely well know to some. And I guess that is where I want us to go. I want to look at the works and appreciate them in the exhibition room, but I also want to move further and think through what is usually not discussed within this frame. For instance I could approach the word inspiration. Or we could claim, like Po’s story indicates, that these works might create attitudes or alternatives we don’t encounter many places in society other than in art; the speechless activity, in the right sense of the word, and the activity without direction.

You are going to the country side with Ellen Jakobsson Strømsø’s father in a few days, to document and bring her contribution to this situation. When I hear her speak about her father I gradually realise who she is and why she creates what she does. The story of him as a member of the Art Council of Stockholm, where he consistently recommends the young female artist with the shortest cv to do public art commissions, expresses an attitude to society we can trace in his daughter’s work. To use another metaphor, since we both like them so much; by creating this situation we are creating a back stage traversing space and time.

Linus:

I have come to think of the individual works as subjects. The principles of selection are based on an interpersonal perspective, as if I was positioned in relation to an object, in the sense of an individual, rather than an art object. This is a position which undermines both discursive and rational interpretations, but instead force us one step closer to the Suchness which Huxley speaks of. Both the institutional and economical logic in the art world is based on track record and the idea of the oeuvre. This is what actually regulates value in economic terms but also in significance. The value is created and re-created through the surrounding text. Criticism, reproductions and our own communication such as this very text you are reading right, now helps to upkeep a certain order. When it comes to: change the world, I suggest we see that as having the tools to change the situation we create. In this case we do it through compiling this project in a mode that does not consider the length of any CV, just as little as Ellen Jakobsson Strømsø’s father considers it in any way. Anders Widoff writes: Millan and I must at some point have walked through the same dream. How else can it be explained that that this painting evokes so many memories? Moreover, I think that the painting seems to emerge as moisture and mold from the base. It seems almost as unpainted.

Anne:

That is why it is important to meet the works. Meet them and figure out how they affect, it they affect, and then try to describe that meeting. This way we can contribute to new thoughts about art, and with an attitude to display something not displayed before. This is something the institutional and economic art world has had to face in this globalised world. Because, at the same time as we have few tools to handle these works within the institutional circuit, we cannot apply our tools to art and visual expressions form other parts of the world without possibly abusing them. To let art exist in its own right for a while, without the evaluating “system” is a liberating thought, as well as necessary. Because it is not our task to dignify the contemporary at the same time as the contemporary happens. We cannot create a map of a terrain which doesn’t exist yet, we can at best make a weather prediction. Once again I turn to the exhibition vs. the exhibition situation. It might not be about changing the world we already know, as much as it is about changing the consciousness about the world about to be created. In this case the consciousness about the framework.

Linus:

In this case I think of the exhibition situation as visiting a dear friend, when you sit together in the kitchen or maybe on her bedside. You talk intimately about things; mutual experiences and shared secrets. Maybe you lightly touch each other’s hands.

Mikael Lundberg explains his relation to the Venetian portrait of the woman very straight forward:

it’s bought in venice, late 80’s when i lived there with katrin for 5 years, we even got married there, i saw it in the window of a restorer and bought it, i wanted it since it represented both katrin and venice, 2 factors that had an amazing impact on me and my artwork.

His words are liberated from rhetorical figures, academic alibis and worries. It is the explanation to why this is a work that means something, and that is the explanation to why it is included in our exhibition.

Anne:

This makes me think about the difference between interaction and staying in touch. It is easy to stay in touch with the help of something which replaces the format of conversation, nudge, kudos, sms. All three kinds of attention are pleasant, but can never really replace the conversation. Yet, we know that we don’t necessarily have to be close to the one we have a conversation with. Tønnes Omdal’s painting which has been hanging in the living room of Sveinung Rudjord Unneland’s grandparents, for instance, has been conversing quietly from the past for many years already. It keeps conversing, both with Sveinung and us. This work is important to the family, and Sveinung writes:

Tønnes Omdal (1920-80) worked all his life at Lista, except his years as a student at SHKS and The Art Academy in Oslo. At Lista he ran a small farm on the side of his activity as a painter. The work in this exhibition situation is owned by my grandparents, and has its reserved space above the sofa in their living room.

My grandother has told me many times that Omdal claimed it to be the pest painting he ever painted. I have often wondered if this was something he told everyone who wanted to buy his works, or if this was in a class of its own. It depicts a harsh weathered landscape, like I know it from Lista where I grew up. As a kid I could not see what the image portrayed or why it was supposed to be so good.

I often find it difficult to believe in art. Maybe that difficulty is similar to my doubt that chaotic colour fields could represent a landscape. When I look at the image today, I wonder how something as everyday as a changing sky above a landscape can be so much more. It’s as if this study of nature from the Seventies depicts something entirely different, like the emptiness after hours in front of the TV or the powerlessness after fifteen million hits on the internet. And I thought I had to make a noisy multimedia installation!

Linus:

It is a question of critical moments, maybe even a psychoanalytic process. It is a collection of points of references and informal historical objects that have shaped individuals. I will end with Tova Mozard’s text about the work that named this project. She writes:

The artwork I named “Dig it” is an old spade with the words DIG IT written in silver text on the blade.

The work was made in the Eighties by my father Lars Westin. Lars was born 1955 in Ystad and died in 1993 in Thailand. He was found in a hotel room. The vague and negligent written abduction report mentioned cardiac arrest as a result of an overdose as the cause of death.

Lars was an artist but lacked adequate education and he never had much of a career. He went to an art program at Östra Grevie 1973-1975, he made drawings, paintings, collages and assembled objects. He was interested in craft, Arnold Böcklin, surrealism and symbolism.

To re-activate and re-use things was something magic to him, he said it was important to be surrounded by things which were rooted in the souls of humans, that this established a certain contact. He collected human hair, jewels, junk, chains, textiles and toys. He assembled this to shamanistic objects and three-dimensional images or he just used it to pimp lamps, mirrors and carpets. He talked about making “things glow” and was interested in occultism. To him art was a state of mind rather than something fixed.

He was the kind of artist who claimed not to stand the light of day, he stayed up all night, painting to the soundtrack of Captain Beefheart and Greatful Dead. He loved the aroma of wet paint and dissolving agent.

When I was a child and visited my dad in Lund, we used to sit on the floor of his two-room apartment and listen to Elvis Presley and draw. I was allowed to draw directly on his oriental carpet, according to him it was a way to communicate with all the symbols woven into the carpets. I remember the luxurious feeling of using his silver and golden pens, I had to pump the ink through by pushing the edge against the paper until it shaped a dazzling, metallic spot. After Lars die, I inherited many of his things. The spade was one of them. I was thirteen the, and I remember how cool I thought it was. I kept it in my room and when I moved I brought it with me.

What makes it so powerful is its simplicity and the humorous form of a readymade. I can see his cynical world-view and his black humour reflected in it. Lars talked a lot about death and the process of dying. For me the spade has become a symbol of the effort it is to live. To dig where you stand or digging your own grave, that is the question.

DIG IT er en samtaletekst skrevet i forbindelse med utstillingssituasjonen med samme navn.

Linus:

Jag tycker vi skall förändra världen, hoppas du inte tycker det är en alltför ambitiös målsättning ...Vi måste börja med att tänka om grunderna för utställningsproduktion. Du vet hur vi håller på. Ser utställningar, läser texter, går på seminarier och gör ateljébesök. Kan vi inte glömma allt det där för ett slag?

Jag läste förresten Aldous Huxley igår. Han skriver: Konsten är, antar jag, bara för nybörjare eller sådana helhjärtade slöfockar som en gång för alla beslutat nöja sig med surrogat för Sådantvarandet. De bryr sig mer om symbolerna än deras betydelse, de fäster sig mera vid det elegant komponerade receptet än vid själva måltiden.

Mitt förslag är att vi struntar i receptet den här gången om du tillåter metaforiken. Jag tänker på ett antal verk jag stött på genom åren, av Ylva Oglands pappa, Tova Mozards pappa och en målning som hänger i Anders Widoffs ateljé. De är alla fantastiska verk som haft stor betydelse men som är okända för en bredare publik.

Jag har talat med några andra konstnärer också för att undersöka om de har verk med motsvarande betydelse och fått fantastiska svar. Så här skriver Po Hagström:

Om byn som inte brydde sig om konst, och om konstnären som målade ändå.

Paul Cseplö kom till Jämtland som barn när hans familj flydde undan kriget i Ungern. Han fascinerades av det nya landskapet och snart började han måla. Att folk i trakten misstrodde konst påverkade honom inte och när jag växte upp var Paul byns enda konstnär.Man värderar fortfarande inte konst i vår by. Men Pauls svar på att ingen vill betala för kultur var att han målade ändå. Numera finns Pauls måleri i vartannat hem i byn. Det finns i pizzerian, i båthus, på husbilar och på ålderdomshemmet. Han har målat scenen på hembygdsgården, fonden till dansbanan och de stora salarna i gamla skolan. Han fick nästan aldrig betalt och bara sällan ville någon ersätta honom för färgen. Ibland visades han inte ens tacksamhet.

Paul fortsatte måla hela livet. När jag besökte honom på sjukhuset under hans sista tid stod han med dropp i armen och målade en skogstjärn på sjukhusväggen. Åren innan hade både hans mamma och ena bror dött i leukemi och själv hade han kämpat mot cancer i flera år. Pappa blev ledsen när Pauls förestående död kom på tal, men Paul bara skrattade: ”Var inte ledsen, du kan väl följa med?” Enligt Paul försvinner ingenting, det bara övergår i något nytt.

2008 dog Paul i leukemi. Han var en av de bästa människor jag någonsin mött. Och även om han har rätt i att inget någonsin försvinner, så är världen sämre nu när han lämnat oss.

Den mest intressanta fråga man kan ställa om konst, är vad den gör. Pauls konst har förändrat ett samhälle. Hans gärning har gjort det omöjligt att vistas i min by utan att man konfronteras med konst. Kan de som bor där undgå att påverkas av detta? Jag vet inte. Tycker jag att de förtjänar all denna konst? Absolut inte. Men Paul tvivlade aldrig på konstens värde eller på styrkan i dess närvaro. Och hans val att sprida konst är en ständigt närvarande position när jag själv agerar som konstnär/curator.

Anne:

Forandre verden, du, ja hvorfor ikke? På mange måter er det det disse verkene allerede har gjort. De har sådd frø hos kunstnerne og vært med å påvirke deres kunstnerskap. Og jeg er enig, la oss legge til side rammene vi vanligvis opererer innenfor. Hva vil det for eksempel si å lage en utstillingssituasjon, mer enn en utstilling? Jeg tror at ved å skape en situasjon mer enn en utstilling så åpnes det opp for relasjoner og møter på en annen måte enn i en utstilling. Og da snakker jeg ikke nødvendigvis om sosiale situasjoner, men om situasjoner mellom verk og betrakter. For vi inviterer inn i et dokumentasjonsrom, et rom der vi gjennom eksempler dokumenterer og anerkjenner de private møtene som har oppstått med arbeidene vi viser. Dette er ikke opphøyde verk som er verdenskjent, og vi vil kanskje heller ikke at de skal bli det? Det er verk som neste ingen kan vite hvordan ser ut før de ser dem i denne situasjonen. Jeg sier nesten, for det er klart at de er uhyre velkjent for noen. Og det er vel litt i den retningen jeg vil ta oss. Jeg vil se på verkene og verdsette dem for det de er i utstillingsrommet, men så vil jeg bevege meg videre og tenke over ting som vanligvis ikke blir diskutert i den vante rammen. For eksempel kan jeg nærme meg ordet inspirasjon. Eller så kan vi, som historien over til Po indikerer; påstå at disse verkene skaper holdninger eller alternativer vi ikke ser så mange andre steder i samfunnet enn i kunsten. Den målløse, i ordets begge betydninger, aktiviteten. Målløs både i ikkeverbal form, men også målløs som i retningsløs.

Du skal jo ut på landet med kunstneren Ellen Jakobsson Strømsøs far om noen dager, for å dokumentere og ta med deg hennes bidrag til denne kabalen. Og når jeg hører hennes beskrivelse av sin egen far så forstår jeg mer av hvem hun er, og hvorfor hun skaper slik hun gjør. Historien om ham som medlem i Stockholms Konstråd der han konsekvent anbefaler den unge kvinnelige kunstneren med kortes cv til kunst i offentlig rom-oppdrag uttrykker en holdning til samfunnet vi kan se i hans datters arbeid. Hvis man skal bruke en lignelse, som vi begge liker så godt, så skaper vi et med denne utstillingssituasjonen slags back stage som krysser både tid og rom.

Linus:

Jag har alltmer kommit att tänka på de enskilda verken som ett subjekt. Urvalskriteriet blir ett interpersonellt perspektiv, som om jag stod i relation till ett objekt i betydelsen individ snarare än konstobjekt. Det är ett ställningstagande som drivet till sin spets strävar efter att underminera diskursiva och rationella positioner men som också innebär att vi tar steget närmare det Sådantvarande som Huxley talar om.

Både den institutionella och ekonomiska logiken i konstvärden fungerar ut-ifrån track record och idéen om konstnärens oeuvre. Det är alltså det som reglerar värde, både i ekonomiska termer och i form av betydelse. Värde-skapandet regleras genom en rad mekanismer som vi känner igen som den omgivande texten. Kritik, reproduktioner och vår egen kommunikation, exempelvis texter som den här, som du just läser hjälper till att upprätthålla en given ordning.

När jag säger ”förändra världen” menar jag att vi har verktygen att förändra den ”situation” vi skapar. Det gör vi genom att sammanställa den här ut-ställningen enligt en princip som lika lite som Ellen Jakobsson Strømsøs far tar hänsyn till längden på en eller annan CV. Anders Widoff skriver: Millan och jag måste någon gång ha vandrat i samma dröm. Hur ska jag annars förklara att målningen väcker så många minnen? Dessutom tycker jag om att målningen tycks växa fram som fukt och mögel ur underlaget. Den framstår närmast som omålad.

Anne:

Det er derfor det er viktig å møte verkene. Møte dem og finne ut hvordan de påvirker, om de påvirker, og deretter prøve å beskrive dette møtet. Slik kan vi være med på å skape noe nytt. En ny tenkning rundt kunst. Og en ny holdning til det som tidligere ikke er vist. Det er også noe den institusjonelle og økonomiske kunstverden du beskriver over har måtte føle på i denne globaliserte verden. For like lite som vi har kjente verktøy å bruke for å plassere disse verkene inn i det institusjonelle, kan vi bruke våre verktøy på kunst og visuelle uttrykk fra andre deler av verden uten kanskje å overgripe oss. Det å la kunst få eksistere alene en liten stund, uten dette vurderende ”systemet” rundt er en befriende tanke. Og jeg tror nødvendig. For det er ikke vår oppgave å opphøye samtiden i det samtiden skjer. Vi kan ikke skape et kart over et terreng som ikke finnes enda, vi kan i beste fall lage en værvarsling. Og jeg vender igjen til utstillingen kontra utstillingssituasjonen. Det handler kanskje ikke om å forandre verden som vi allerede kjenner, så mye som det kan handle om å forandre bevisstheten om den verden som er i ferd med å komme. Bevisstheten om rammen til kunstverket, i det her tilfellet.

Linus:

Jag tänker mig utställningssituationen i det här fallet som ett besök hos en kär vän, när man sitter vid köksbordet, i soffan eller på sängkanten och talar förtroeligt om saker. Gemensamma upplevelser och delade hemligheter. Kanske nuddar man vid varrandras händer. Mikael Lundberg förklarar relationen till det venizianska kvinnoporträttet utan omsvep:
den e köpt i venedig i slutet av 80-talet då katrin o jag bodde där i 5 år, där vi oxå gifte oss, jag såg den i en restaurerares fönster o köpte den, jag ville ha den då den representerade både katrin o venedig, 2 faktorer som har haft en fantastisk betydelse på mig o min konst.

Det är en redogörelse befriad från retoriska figurer, akademiska alibin och ängslan. Det är förklaringen till varför det är ett verk som betyder något och det är förklaringen till varför det är med i vår utställning.

Anne:

Det får meg til å tenke på forskjellen mellom å interagere og holde kontakt. Det er veldig lett å holde kontakt gjennom noe som erstatter samtalen som format, nudge, kudos, sms. Alle tre former for oppmerksomhet er hyggelige, men de kan aldri helt erstatte det som er en samtale. Allikevel så vet vi at man ikke alltid trenger å være i nærheten av den man samtaler med. Tønnes Omdals maleri som har hengt hjemme hos besteforeldrene til Sveinung Rudjord Unneland, for eksempel, har talt i stillhet og fra fortiden i mange år allerede. Og fortsetter å tale, både til oss og til Sveinung. Verket har hatt stor betydning for familien. Sveinung skriver:

Tønnes Omdal (1920-80) virket hele sitt liv fra Lista, med unntak fra studieårene ved SHKS og Statens kunstakademiet i Oslo. På Lista drev han et lite småbruk ved siden av livet som kunstmaler. Kunstverket på denne utstillingssituasjonen eies av mine besteforeldre og har sin faste plass over sofaen i stuen deres. Mormor har mange ganger fortalt at Omdal selv mente at det var det beste bildet han noen gang hadde malt. Jeg har ofte lurt på om dette var noe han sa til alle som ønsket å kjøpe av han, eller om dette bildet var i særklasse. Bildet skildrer et værhardt landskap, slik jeg kjenner det fra Lista der jeg selv vokste opp. Som barn kunne jeg verken se hva bildet forestilte eller skjønne hvorfor det skulle være så bra.

Jeg syntes ofte det er vanskelig å tro på kunsten. Kanskje er vanskene lik den tvilen jeg en gang hadde om at kaotiske fargeflater kunne forestille et landskap. Når jeg ser på bildet i dag unders jeg over at noe så hverdagslig som en skiftende himmel over et landskap også gir så mye mer. Det er som om dette naturstudiet fra 70-tallet skildrer noe helt annet, som tomheten etter timer foran tv eller maktesløsheten etter femten millioner treff på internett. Og jeg som trodde jeg måtte lage en støyende multimediainstallasjon!

Linus:

Det är en fråga om avgörande ögonblick och kanske en psykoanalytisk process. Det är en samling av referenspunkter och informella historiska objekt som har format individer. Jag avslutar med Tova Mozards text om verket som gett namn åt det här projektet. Hon skriver:

Konstverket som jag har valt att ge titeln ”Dig it” är en gammal spade där texten DIG IT står skrivet med silverfärg på bladet.

Verket är gjort någon gång på åttitalet av min far Lars Westin. Lars föddes 1955 i Ystad och dog 1993 i Thailand. Man fann honom på ett hotellrum och de vaga och hafsigt skrivna obduktionspappren nämner hjärtstillestånd till följd av överdos som dödsorsak.

Lars var konstnär fast saknade högskoleutbildning och fick aldrig någon egentlig karriär. Han gick konstlinjen på Östra Grevie 1973-1975 och målade, tecknade gjorde collage och tillverkade objekt. Romantiken, surrealismen, symbolismen, Arnold Böcklin och konsthantverk intresserade honom.

Att återanvända saker var något magiskt för honom, han sa att det var viktigt att omge sig med ting som var förankrad i någons själ att det gav en slags kontakt. Han samlade på människohår, ädelstenar, skrot, kedjor, tyger och leksaker, dessa sattes ihop till schamanliknande objekt, tredimensionella bilder eller användes för att utsmycka lampor, speglar och mattor. Han pratade om konsten i att få “saker att lysa” och intresserade sig för det ockulta. Konsten skulle vara ett tillstånd snarare än något fixerat.

Han var den sortens konstnär som påstod sig inte tåla dagens ljus utan helst satt uppe hela nätterna och målade lyssnades på Captain Beefheart och Greatful Dead. Han älskade lukten av oljefärg och lösningsmedel.

När jag var liten och hälsade på pappa nere i Lund brukade vi sitta på golvet i hans lilla tvåa och lyssna på Elvis Presley och rita. Man fick rita direkt på hans orientaliska matta och enligt honom var det ett sätt att ingå i en kommunikation med all den symbolik som fanns invävt i mattorna. Jag kommer ihåg hur lyxigt det kändes att få rita med hans silver och guld pennor, man fick pumpa fram bläcket genom att trycka pennspetsen mot pappret tills det rann ut i en metallic skimrande pöl. Efter Lars död ärvde jag mycket av hans saker och däribland fanns spaden, jag var tretton år då och kommer ihåg att jag tyckte spaden var cool och att jag hade den i mitt rum. Den har hängt med sen dess.

Vad som gör spaden så bra är dess enkelhet i form och utförande, en ready made med humor. Jag tycker mig även se hans cyniska världsåskådning och svarta humor speglat i den. Lars pratade mycket om döden och processen dit, för mig symboliserar spaden arbetet som det innebär att leva. Att gräva där man står eller gräva sin egen grav, det är frågan.