Retrospective Catalogue 2010 is the collection of commissioned texts accompanying Hordaland Art Centre's exhibitions, as well as documentation of all the exhibitions with the witness report on the 2010 programme written by artist Anne Marthe Dyvi.

Through six exhibitions and two Master Weekends, there has been a subtle discussion of how art is an intrinsic part of society at Hordaland Art Centre. Together with artists, curators, writers and of course the audience we have let different views play freely, and as summary we offer this retrospective catalogue both in print and online. We want our common production to be avaliable to as many people as possible, at the same time as this is a way of turning both the Art Centre and its archives inside out into the public where we participate actively. The catalogue is designed by Ole Kristian Øye at Klipp og Lim.
www.kunstsenter.no

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

Art is also reality
Foreword to Retrospective Catalogue 2010.

There is a language which operates outside both theory and the private sphere, even next to politics. This is the language of society, a language that should be encouraged and developed. This language is spoken by all societies, and it possesses the power to change society itself. One of its dialects is art. Art can speak with a political accent, an intimate accent, a poetic accent, a philosophical accent, as well as many other accents, but it must never surrender its own dialect.

This year's program has provided space for artists who through their works have discussed issues arising from other societal dialects, such as history, geography, literature, architecture and design, but without surrendering their own voice. Through six exhibitions and many other events we have observed the world of today, and this year's Retrospective catalogue, the second of its kind, once more turns the year inside out so we can observe them as a whole. This totality is the voice of Hordaland Art Centre in society – a voice that can only be discovered through cooperation with artists and other thinkers.

The year began with Sveinung Rudjord Unneland's solo exhibition, Palinca Pastorale, consisting of several works put together in the form of a discussion. All these works were aesthetically pleasing and balanced, though sketches of torture chambers and questionable production methods were lurking just beneath the surface. Artist Thomas Hestvold was commissioned to write a reflection on Unneland's works for the exhibition. Hestvold does more than that, through art he envisages the potential for general reflections. Such as: Let it be clear: Doubt and scepticism are the prime prerequisites for cultural and intellectual development. Where distrust, criticism and wry looks are suppressed, you get stagnation, surveillance and terror. As a conclusion to this exhibition period, Paul Otto Brunstad, priest, academic and author, was asked to talk about how borders divide and unite, simultaneously functioning as stop points and meeting points, and how limitations are the birth place, both of hope and creativity.

In January, Hordaland Art Centre also was invited to Umeå, Sweden, to recreate the 2009 exhibition DIG IT, thus becoming the first Outside project of the year. Aided by our hosts, the artist-run gallery Verkligheten, curator Linus Elmes and I, assembled works that the artists themselves consider important to their work. Once again, we had a collection of works reflecting a variety of political, social or ideological attitudes, and considering the importance they still have for their owners, they provided a close reading of how artists relate to a more informal visual practice. DIG IT is a flexible exhibition situation, and through the constant moving about, endless iconographical geographies are constructed. The artistic practices of Anna Eliasson, Per Enoksson, Rebecka Adelhult Feklistoff, Kent Gustafsson, Ida Hansson, Johanna Larsson, Allan Mattsson and Ulla Thøgersen take shape against the backdrop of these works, at least in part.

The exhibition of a single work by Hamdi Attia, curated by Abdellah Karroum, became the second solo exhibitions this spring. Entitled Archipelago, a World Map, it presented a fictional world encompassing arguments about what representations hide or reveal, the relationship between history and geography, as well as the role of artists in society. Cartographic fragments of Palestinian terretories created an image of a potential world. Through his interview with the artist, Karroum reveals how this work can be viewed in connection with a long-term commitment. One of the claims made is, What separates art from activism, is the degree of poetic expression. Matthew Flintham, the British researcher and artist, lectured on his long-term research project Parallel Landscapes, where he discusses physical and invisible aspects of military power projections, the mapping of territories, and how the state positions itself, with particular reference to the United Kingdom.

The third solo exhibition was Vanna Bowles' Wild Tree, where we encounter a universe of drawing. The exhibition was directly tied in with fiction, and as the creation of the works for the exhibition progressed, author and artist Linn Cecilie Ulvin produced texts that were partly a part of the exhibition, but that could partly be read independently of it, such as the longish text, Det utilgivelige, angeren og historier om den tause skogen (The unforgivable, remorse and histories about the silent forest), which can be found in this catalogue. Through a number of observations, we witness someone walking away: She looks around. She has never been in this area before. What if she doesn’t run into a single soul for weeks? She cannot expect help from anyone in the forest. If she needs help, she must go back the same way she came. But she can’t go back. Not now. Now everyone knows about her infatuation. What would she do in town? Stagger around the streets on her own? A book was also published in connection with this exhibition. The artist James Webb was asked to re-narrate his exhibition One day, all of this will be yours, which had recently been on show at Blank Projects in Cape Town; thus we gathered different artists' views on narrative; Bowles' fragmented and associative approach, and Webb's, which was strictly chronological.

After the summer break, we set out to explore artistic collaboration through a series of three exhibitions, each of them created by two artists, to explore how this collaboration might manifest itself. First, a general observation: The projects became broader, reaching beyond the walls of our exhibition space. A common denominator of all these exhibitions is that preparations have involved journeys and movement.

First off the mark were Lutz-Rainer Müller and Stian Ådlandsvik with their two-part exhibition You only tell me you love me when you're drunk, where one part was presented at Hordaland Art Centre and the other at 67 Holmedalshammaren, Askøy, near Bergen. The artists turned the house at 67 Holmedalshammaren into a sculpture. This house was from a different era, having been built during the winter of 1956–57. In the old days, houses were built for eternity, while these days homes have become an investment, more than a dear necessity. At least according to the media, where talk about properties is just as much talk about money. As Norway has changed from a nation of sensible rationing of most things to a country of extreme opulence, our relationship with our surroundings has changed, as well. The two artists created a model of the house and sent it around the world, poorly wrapped up. The model travelled via Beijing to Sydney, New York and Paris. The sculpture at Askøy is a recreation of the model as it appeared on its return. The materials that were removed from 67 Holmedalshammaren, have been used to create the exhibition at Hordaland Art Centre. The German curator Petra Reichensperger wrote the text Rapporter fra Hinterland (Dispatches from the Hinterland) for this project, where she, among other things, described how the artists consider unpredictability a quality in itself. One night during the exhibition period, people were invited to a site specific lecture by art historian Eva Rem Hansen and artist and curator Randi Grov Berger in the garage at 67 Holmedalshammaren. They discussed the place of the sculpture, and the project as a whole, both as part of artistic tradition, but also in specific political discussions about local land-use planning and the establishment of industries.

During September we had our second Outside project of the year, Knitting Concert by Victoria Brännström. This work, which was presented on a Saturday morning at the Grieg Hall, was an experimental sound work, as well as being a feminist action. As the result of long-term collaboration with Bergen Husflidslag (Bergen Folk Art and Craft Association), the artist assembled a group of some 40 women who were asked to knit a concert. The concert was produced by placing the women in an orchestra-like formation with microphones fastened to their knitting needles while they knitted, directed by Halldis Rønning and transformed by DJ Ingrid Grønli Åm. During the last couple of years, Brännström's focus has been on investigating different kinds of hierarchies, also the status of traditional female tasks and crafts in today's world. So as to underline the themes she is working on at any given time, she has also infused the processes she employs during her work with separatist feminist methods. This also characterizes the process employed in the project Knitting Concert. The product is just as important for traditional handicrafts as for modern production, but in the case of crafts and handicrafts, the associations to the process leading towards the result point in quite different directions than just the result. The time involved, the motivation required to reach the destination, as well as one's desire and memories, are important associations that are brought into play during this performance. Ethnologist Ingrid Birce Müftüo?lu was present at the concert and has written the text Women, hands and knitting needles. She writes, These clicking sounds, which neither will nor can string together into meaningful words, make a refined counterpoint to the idea of knitting as a female art of craft. During the struggle for women's liberation in the 1970s, knitting and other traditional female activities were harnessed to shape the contents of a new female culture. This was the decade when the concept of politics was widened.

Next, during the second exhibition of the autumn, we were presented with the universe inhabited by Øyvind Renberg and Miho Shimizu: Upstream. They are always concerned with analyzing our relationship with the world of images and the mass-produced objects surrounding us. This exhibition presented both old and new works, as well as studies for future works. Thus they pointed both backwards and forwards in time. While all the works were presented in a black gallery space. Upstream pointed forwards as they have been involved in a travelling residency in Hardanger, in order to create a work, an Asian picture scroll for Hordaland Art Centre's Outside series next year. In preparation for this future work they have, among other things, taken a closer look at the stereotypical view of nature so common in Norway, and how our visual memory has largely been influenced by mass-produced photographs. In her text Upstream: The Dérive within the Immersion, curator and writer Denise Carvalho writes: It serves as a matrix to rethink ideas of relationships, environmental awareness, visual perception, and performative experience. Here, storytelling can be both historically oriented and organically re-contextualized as narrative, with a beginning and an end. Their watercolours, for example, show a post-humanist narrative in which birds and animals from the region gather to help each other from drowning against a seascape of melting glaziers and majestic flaming skies, a clear critique on a manmade environmental disaster. One of their earlier works, the china set Rio, produced by Figgjo, could be seen at the exhibition, as well as purchased from the coffee shop Sakristiet, at Bryggen. Thus, this exhibition also had a life outside the gallery. In connection with the exhibition, anthropologist Charlotte Bik Bandlien presented an introduction to the dynamic interaction between the ethnographic turn in art and the representational crisis in anthropology.

During the autumn, Hordaland Art Centre co-curated the exhibition Zwischenraum: Space Between at Kunstverein Hamburg in Germany, in association with SWG3 of Glasgow. Thus this became our third Outside project of the year. This was another exploration of collaboration, both between institutions, between the participating artists: Oliver Bulas, Nick Evans, Julia Horstmann, Alon Levin, Cato Løland, Ingrid Lønningdal and Ciara Phillips, as well as other invited guests. Through a number of meetings between curators Annette Hans, Jamie Kenyon and myself, we developed a framework for the artists who were invited to attend, which gradually turned into a residency programme. The format was presented to the public in these words: A known unknown is something we know that we don't know. Inviting a number of artists to inhabit an art institution for a set amount of time is to invite uncertainty and the unknown into the exhibition space. Having decided not to impose a thematic connection between the works in this exhibition, we knew that each artist's urge to create and participate would be manifested, and art would happen, but at the same time we knew that we wouldn’t know what kind of creations, contributions and works would happen. We use the word "happen" deliberately, as the exhibition that welcomes you has been created on a residency platform which is both a part of the process prior to and a part of the exhibition. Thus the artists themselves are present within the framework of the exhibition. Due to this platform, it becomes possible for them to influence the exhibition, also while the public has access to it. During the six week long exhibition period, the exhibition was installed twice, underwent minor changes throughout the whole period, and was accompanied by an extensive side programme, including lectures and reading circles created as a joint effort by the artists, curators and the hosting institution.

The last exhibition of the year was Leila by de artist duo aiPotu, the artists Anders Kjellesvik and Andreas Siqueland. Various concepts of inaccessibility connected with land areas, history, old traditions and knowledge were discussed through a series of sculptures inside the exhibition room as well as an extensive alteration to the exterior of Hordaland Art Centre. Like the two other duo exhibitions, this one also started with a journey. In March of 2009 the artists were challenged to visit the island Leila in the Strait of Gibraltar, in view of their ongoing project, The Island Tour. They made the journey, but they never reached their destination. The island has been a no-man's land since 2002, when a conflict over sovereignty nearly turned into a military confrontation between Spain and Morocco. The island is still under close military surveillance, and it is known by several official names: The origin of the Moroccan name Leila is the Spanish word "La Isla", meaning "the island". The Spanish refer to the island as parsley – "Perejil”, while the Berber name is "Tura", meaning "empty". The exhibition invited artist and critic Zachary Cahill to offer his thoughts about the project; his review was available already at the opening, saying among other things, The island appears to be unremarkable enough, save for its peculiar status as an island in exile. The island is, in a sense, a reverse panopticon. It is this quality of visibility to which the exhibition alludes, which may be thought of as hiding in plain sight. He wrote a longer reflection, as well, also printed in this catalogue. In connection with this exhibition, we screened the film Tameksaout by the film-maker Ivan Boccara. Throughout years of studies and immersion in the subject, Boccara has kept track of several Berber families and different social processes in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco. This film from 2005 portrays a shepherd family where feeding the animals is not the only everyday concern, but also to keep the fire alive. The film is a slow-moving portrait of three generations faced with a changing world.

Besides the six exhibitions described above, we have made a tradition of asking two MA students from Bergen National Academy of the Arts to create a Master's weekend. In the spring, art student Sol Hallset presented her exhibition Belonging. Becoming. Being, which, in the shape of a simple drawing of a human figure, confronted us with the question, "what does it mean to be human". Hallset enlarged the proportions of the figure to fit between ceiling and roof in the exhibition space, thus making her discussion visible. Being human is not just a question about the relationship between one's inner self and an outer surface or facade, but also about one's relationship to other people. We are concerned, not just with our outward appearance and how others perceive us, we are also constantly comparing ourselves with our surroundings. This autumn's art student was Therese Hoen; in her exhibition, The frame consists of nothing but this, a reflection about a house served as her starting point. Following a process where a number of people drew their own plans of the same house, she created a work without allusions to themes like property and ownership. At the exhibition, this house was held together by memories and fragile armatures made of china, creating a new plan of the house which people could step into.

Involving young artists is a tradition at Hordaland Art Centre, and recently we have also invited young art historians to add to our activities. We have noticed that by asking non-artists to scrutinize art and its domain, we get a wider discussion, one that is of use to all involved parties. Besides those who have contributed their reflections on art in connection with exhibitions, young art historians have presented their projects and research findings to an open audience during a series of lectures called Master's Night. Thus we would like to create a meeting ground for students and professionals within the art scene, and facilitate closer contact between the academic scene and art practice in Bergen.

In addition to being an institution exhibiting and communicating art, Hordaland Art Centre is also a centre for professional debate. This becomes particularly obvious during B-open, where we coordinate open studios and seminars. This year the entire programme had the same title as the seminar: To produce an art scene. Like last year, we invited an observer to attend the seminar – Susanne Christensen, literary and art critic. Her text is also included in this catalogue.

We always want to contribute to discussion and be ever generous with the thoughts arising within our sphere. And so we invite all our guests from the residency programme to talk about their work, a theme that is of special interest to them, or their plans for the future, as they visit Bergen. We have been presented with a wide range of activities and reflections, indeed, we have even been invited on a picnic. During 2010 our guests have been: Hyunjin Kim (curator, South Korea), Margret Holz (artist, Germany), Daniela Castro (writer and curator, Brazil), Marco Bruzzone (artist, Italy/Germany), Bertram Haude (artist, Germany), Juan Andres Gaitán (art historian and curator, Canada/Holland), Maija Rudovska (art historian and curator, Latvia), Cécile Belmont (artist, France/Germany), Johan Lundh (curator, Sweden) and LeRoy Stevens (artist, USA).

In addition to facilitating public debate, we also want to be an open-minded place with space for different explorations. Our collaboration with two other institutions, Baltic Art Center – BAC in Visby and The Factory of Art & Design, FFKD in Copenhagen, has resulted in the creation of a Collaborative Research Residency where a group consisting of three collaborationg partners come together for a month to research and investigate a subject of their own choosing. The first group to be welcomed to Bergen was Miriam Fumarola, Marti Manen and Katarina Stenkvist, who set about investigating the possibility of new thinking about gender and representation within the art institution. They invited Olav Fumarola Unsgaard to be their guest. Together they want to develop viable methods by studying the interaction of different forms of discriminatory power structures, and during December they will both lead a presentation and hold a workshop for members of the public who are interested in the subject. Namik Mackic, Samir M’kadmi and Camilla Shim Winge visited BAC, and Andjeas Ejiksson, Virginija Januškevi?i?t? and Valentinas Klimašauskas visited FFKD.

Once again this year, we have had a witness, someone who has observed the institution throughout the year. The artist Anne Marthe Dyvi, who graduated from Bergen National Academy of the Arts this year, has presented her reflections about Hordaland Art Centre, what it is and might be, in the text Promemoria (Memo).

In closing, let it be said that we will continue our exhibitions, presentations and residency programmes in 2011, but on top of all that, we will mark Hordaland Art Centre's 35th anniversary. We wish you all welcome to a jubilee programme which will manifest itself throughout the whole year!

Translated from the Norwegian by Egil Fredheim

---------
---------
NORSK
--------
--------

Kunst er også virkelig
Forord til Retrospektiv katalog 2010

Det finnes et språk utenfor både teori og den private sfæren, til og med til siden for politikk. Det er samfunnets språk, et språk som burde bli oppmuntret og utviklet. Dette språket snakkes av alle samfunn, og har kraft til å endre det. Kunst er en av dialektene. Kunst kan snakke med en politisk aksent, en intim aksent, en poetisk aksent, en filosofisk aksent, og mange andre aksenter, men må aldri gi opp sin egen dialekt.

I årets program har vi gitt plass til kunstnere som gjennom sine verk har diskutert tema knyttet til andre dialekter i samfunnet, slik som historie, geografi, litteratur, arkitektur og formgiving, men uten å miste sin egen stemme. Gjennom seks utstillinger og mange andre programposter har vi sett på verden vi lever i i dag, og i årets Retrospektiv katalog, den andre i rekken, vrenger vi igjen året inn ut slik at vi kan ta en titt på disse som en helhet. Denne helheten er Hordaland kunstsenters stemme i samfunnet. En stemme vi bare kan finne i samarbeid med kunstnere og andre tenkere.

Året startet med Sveinung Rudjord Unnelands første separatutstilling Palinca Pastorale, der flere arbeider ble satt sammen til én diskusjon. Alle verkene i utstillingen framsto som estetiske og balanserte, mens det rett under overflaten lusket plantegninger av torturkammer og tvilsomme produksjonsmetoder. Til utstillingen fikk kunstner Thomas Hestvold i oppgave å formulere en betenkning omkring Unnelands arbeider. Hestvold går lenger, gjennom kunsten ser han muligheten for å formulere noe generelt. Blant annet: La oss bare slå det fast: Tvil og skepsis er den viktigste forutsetningen for kulturell og intellektuell utvikling. Der hvor mistro, kritikk og skeive blikk undertrykkes får man stagnasjon, overvåking og terror. For å konkludere denne utstillingsperioden ble prest, forsker og forfatter Paul Otto Brunstad invitert til å snakke om hvordan grenser skiller og forener, danner stoppunkt og møtepunkter på samme tid, og hvordan begrensningene er håpet og nyskapelsens fødested.

I januar var Hordaland kunstsenter invitert til Umeå i Sverige for å gjenskape utstillingen DIG IT fra 2009, som dermed ble årets første Utenforprosjekt. Gjennom vertskapet, det kunstnerdrevne galleriet Verkligheten, samlet kurator Linus Elmes og undertegnede igjen sammen verk som kunstnere selv mener er viktige for sin praksis. Igjen ble det en samling verk som har ulike sosiale, politiske eller ideologiske utgangspunkt og som med den innflytelsen de fortsetter å ha for sine eiere gir oss muligheten å nærlese hvordan kunstnere forholder seg til en mer uformell visuell praksis. Utstillingssituasjonen DIG IT er fleksibel og gjennom stadig flytting konstrueres uendelige ikonografiske geografier. Det er til dels på bakgrunn av innflytelsen disse verkene har utøvet at kunstnernes (Anna Eliasson, Per Enoksson, Rebecka Adelhult Feklistoff, Kent Gustafsson, Ida Hansson, Johanna Larsson, Allan Mattsson og Ulla Thøgersen) praksis avtegner seg.

Den andre i serien på tre separatutstillinger på våren var visningen av ett enkelt verk av Hamdi Attia, kuratert av Abdellah Karroum. Med tittelen Archipelago, a World Map fikk vi presentert en fiktiv verden som rommer diskusjoner om hva representasjoner skjuler eller avslører, forholdet mellom historie og geografi, og hvilken rolle kunstneren spiller i samfunnet. Kartelementer av palestinske landområder skapte et bilde av en potensiell verden. Gjennom et intervju med kunstneren viser Karroum hvordan dette verket kan ses i sammenheng med et langvarig engasjement. En av påstandene som blir framsatt er at Det som skiller kunst fra aktivisme, er graden av poetisk uttrykk. Den britiske forskeren og kunstneren Matthew Flintham foreleste om sitt langvarige forskningsprosjekt Parallel Landscapes der han diskuterer fysiske og usynlige aspekter av militær maktprojeksjon, kartlegging av territorier og hvordan statsmakten innretter seg i landskapet, spesielt i Storbritannia.

Den tredje i rekken av separatutstillinger var Vanna Bowles’ Wild Tree, der vi ble møtt av et tegnet univers. Utstillingen forholdt seg direkte til fiksjonen, og parallelt med utstillingens framvekst skrev kunstner og forfatter Linn Cecilie Ulvin tekster som delvis var del av utstillingen, delvis kunne leses separat, slik som den lengre teksten Det utilgivelige, angeren og historier om den tause skogen som du også kan lese i denne katalogen. Gjennom en rekke observasjoner følger vi en vandring bort: Hun ser seg omkring. Hun har aldri vært i dette området før. Hva hvis hun ikke støter på en sjel på flere uker? I skogen kan hun ikke forvente hjelp av noen. Skal hun ha hjelp, må hun gå tilbake samme veien hun kom fra. Men hun kan ikke gå tilbake. Ikke nå. Nå vet alle om forelskelsen hennes. Hva skulle hun gjøre i byen? Rave alene omkring i gatene? I forbindelse med utstillingen ble det også publisert en bok. Kunstneren James Webb ble invitert til å gjenfortelle sin egen utstilling One day, all of this will be yours, som nettopp hadde blitt vist på Blank Projects i Cape Town, og på den måten nøstet vi sammen ulike kunstneres oppfatninger av det narrative; Bowles’ fragmenterte og assosiative med Webbs strengt kronologiske.

Etter sommeren satte vi oss fore å undersøke kunstnerisk samarbeid i en rekke på tre utstillinger, der hver utstilling ble laget i samarbeid mellom to kunstnere, for på den måten å se hvilke uttrykk dette kunne føre til. En generell observasjon er at prosjektene ble mer omfattende, og strakk seg fysisk ut av vårt eget utstillingslokale. Alle disse utstillingene har hatt til felles at forberedelsene har innebåret reiser og forflytning.

Først ut var Lutz-Rainer Müller og Stian Ådlandsvik med den todelte utstillingen You only tell me you love me when you're drunk, der én del var på Hordaland kunstsenter og den andre var på Holmedalshammaren 67 på Askøy utenfor Bergen. Kunstnerne gjorde huset på adressen Holmedalshammaren 67 om til en skulptur. Huset tilhørte en annen tid, da det ble bygget vinteren 1956/57. Før i tiden bygget man hus for evigheten, mens hus og bolig i dag har endret seg fra å være en kjær nødvendighet til et investeringsobjekt. I hvert fall hvis man skal tro mediene, der boligstoff handler vel så mye om økonomi. Etter hvert som Norge har endret status, fra en nasjon med fornuftige rasjoneringer på det meste til et land med ekstrem overflod, har også vårt forhold til våre omgivelser endret seg. Kunstnerne bygde en modell av huset som de sendte jorden rundt i dårlig emballasje. Den reiste via Beijing, Sydney, New York City og Paris. Skulpturen på Askøy er en gjenskaping av modellen slik den så ut da den kom tilbake. De materialene som er fjernet fra Holmedalshammaren 67, er brukt til å lage utstillingen på Hordaland kunstsenter. Den tyske kuratoren Petra Reichensperger skrev teksten Rapporter fra Hinterland til dette prosjektet der hun blant annet beskrev hvordan kunstnerne ser uforutsigbarheten som en kvalitet. En kveld i utstillingsperioden ble det inviterte til et stedsspesifikt foredrag ved kunsthistoriker Eva Rem Hansen og kunstner og kurator Randi Grov Berger i garasjen på Holmedalshammaren 67. De to diskuterte hvordan skulpturen og prosjektet som helhet plasserte seg i både en kunstnerisk tradisjon, men også i spesifikke lokalpolitiske diskusjoner om både arealplaner og industriutvikling.

I september gjennomførte vi årets andre Utenforprosjekt: Strikkekonsert av Victoria Brännström. Verket som ble framført en lørdag formiddag i Grieghallen var både et eksperimentelt lydarbeid, samtidig som det var en feministisk handling. Gjennom et langvarig samarbeid med Bergen Husflidslag samlet kunstneren en gruppe på ca. 40 kvinner som fikk i oppgave å strikke en konsert. Den ble skapt gjennom at kvinnene satt i en orkesterlignende formasjon med mikrofoner festet til strikkepinnene mens de strikket, og at lyden som ble dirigert fram av Halldis Rønning ble bearbeidet av DJ Ingrid Grønli Åm. Brännström har de siste årene konsentrert seg om å undersøke ulike former for hierarkier, og blant annet sett nærmere på hvilken status tradisjonelt kvinnelige oppgaver og håndarbeid har i dag. Hun har også benyttet seg av kvinneseparatistiske metoder for i prosessen med arbeidene å understreke den tematikken hun tar for seg til enhver tid. Det er også tilfellet for prosessen med prosjektet Strikkekonsert. For tradisjonelle håndverk står produktet i like stor fokus som for moderne produksjon, men assosiasjonene til prosessen som leder mot resultatet for håndverk og håndarbeid peker i helt andre retninger enn bare mot resultatet. Tiden arbeidet tar, drivkraften man må ha for å nå målet, lyst og minner er sterke assosiasjoner som hentes fram i denne performancen. Kulturviter Ingrid Birce Müftüo?lu var tilstede og har skreve teksten Kvinner, hender og pinner der hun skriver: De smattende lydene som ikke vil eller kan forme seg til forståelige ord er kontrapunktiske med forestillingen om stikking som et av de kvinnelige håndarbeider. I den feministiske kampen for kvinnefrigjøring på 1970-tallet, ble strikking og annet tradisjonelt kvinnearbeid benyttet for å formulere innholdet i en ny kvinnekultur. Dette var tiåret da politikkbegrepet ble utvidet.

Deretter fikk vi stifte bekjentskap med universet til Øyvind Renberg og Miho Shimizu i høstens andre utstilling: Upstream. De to er til daglig opptatt av å analysere vårt forhold til den bildeverden og de masseproduserte objektene vi omgir oss med. Denne utstillingen viste både tidligere og nye arbeider, i tillegg til studier for framtidige verk. På den måten pekte de både bakover og framover i tid, og alle verk ble iscenesatt i et sort gallerirom. Upstream pekte framover da de har vært engasjert i et omreisende residency i Hardanger for å skape et verk, en asiatisk bilderull, til Hordaland kunstsenters Utenfor-serie neste år. Til det kommende verket har de blant annet sett nærmere på den stereotype oppfatningen av natur i Norge og hvor sterkt forankret vår visuelle hukommelse er påvirket av massereproduserte fotografier. Kurator og skribent Denise Carvalho skriver i teksten Upstream: Fordypning med drift om bilderullen: Den tjener som en matrise for å revurdere forestillinger om relasjoner, miljøbevissthet, visuell persepsjon og performativ erfaring. Her kan fortellingen være både historisk orientert og (organisk) rekontekstualisert som fortelling, med begynnelse og slutt. Akvarellene demonstrerer for eksempel en posthumanistisk handlingsgang der regionens fugler og dyr går sammen om å redde hverandre fra drukningsdøden, representert ved et hav av smeltende isbreer og glødende himmel, en tydelig kritikk av en menneskeskapt miljøkatastrofe. Et av deres tidligere verk, porselensserviset Rio produsert av Figgjo, var både del av utstillingen og til salgs hos kafeen Sakristiet på Bryggen. På den måten levde også denne utstillingen utenfor gallerirommet. I forbindelse med utstillingen fikk vi også en innføring i dynamikken mellom den etnografiske vendingen i kunsten og representasjonskrisen i antropologien av antropolog Charlotte Bik Bandlien.

I løpet av høsten fungerte Horaland kunstsener som medkurator for utstillingen Zwischenraum: Space Between på Kunstverein Hamburg i Tyskland, i samarbeid med SWG3 i Glasgow. Denne ble dermed vårt tredje Utenforprosjekt i år. Også her ble samarbeid utforsket, både institusjonelt, mellom kunstnerne som deltok: Oliver Bulas, Nick Evans, Julia Horstmann, Alon Levin, Cato Løland, Ingrid Lønningdal og Ciara Phillips, og andre inviterte gjester. Gjennom en rekke møter mellom kuratorene Annette Hans, Jamie Kenyon og undertegnede ble det utviklet et rammeverk for de kunstnerne som ble invitert til å delta, som etter hvert like mye ble et gjestekunstnerprogram. I invitasjonen til publikum ble dette formatet formidlet slik: En kjent ukjent er noe vi vet at vi ikke vet. Ved å invitere en rekke kunstnere til å bebo en kunstinstitusjon i en avgrenset periode, er det som å invitere det usikre og ukjente inn i utstillingslokalet. Ved å utelate enhver forutsatt tematisk sammenheng mellom arbeidene i denne utstillingen, visste vi at kunstnernes trang til å skape og delta ville bli tydelig, og kunst ville oppstå, men samtidig visste vi lite om hva slags skapelser, deltagelser og arbeider som ville skje. Og når vi bruker ordet ”skje” så er det tilsiktet, siden utstillingen du nå ønskes velkommen inn i er skapt på en gjestekunstnerplattform som er både del av forarbeidet, og fortsatt del av utstillingen. Dermed er også kunstnerne selv tilstede i rammeverket for utstillingen. Muligheten de har for å påvirke utstillingen, også i den tiden publikum har tilgang, er takket være denne plattformen. I løpet av utstillingsperioden på seks uker ble utstillingen montert to ganger, utsatt for mindre endringer gjennom hele perioden i tillegg til å få et omfattende sideprogram med forelesninger og lesesirkler skapt i samarbeid mellom kunstnerne, kuratorene og vertsinstitusjonen.

Årets siste utstilling var Leila av kunstnerduoen aiPotu, som er de to kunstnerne Anders Kjellesvik og Andreas Siqueland. Gjennom en rekke skulpturer inne i utstillingsrommet og en omfattende endring av Hordaland kunstsenters ytre, ble ulike utilgjengelighetsbegrep knyttet til landområder, historie, gamle tradisjoner og kunnskap problematisert. På samme måte som de to andre duoutstillingene så startet også denne med en reise. Det var på bakgrunn av aiPotus pågående prosjekt The Island Tour at de i mars 2009 ble utfordret til å oppsøke øya Leila i Gibraltarstredet. Reisen ble gjennomført, men målet ble aldri nådd. Øya har siden 2002 vært et ingenmannsland da en suverenitetskonflikt mellom Spania og Marokko nesten endte i en militær konfrontasjon. Øyen er fortsatt strengt militært bevoktet, og den har flere offisielle navn: Det marokkanske navnet Leila stammer fra det spanske ordet ”La Isla” som betyr ”øyen”. På spansk blir øya referert til som persille – ”Perejil”, mens den på berbersk har navnet ”Tura”, som betyr ”tom”. Til utstillingen ble kunstneren og kritikeren Zach Cahill invitert til å gjøre seg opp tanker omkring prosjektet, og allerede til åpningen forelå hans anmeldelse der vi blant annet kunne lese: Øya gjør ikke noe videre av seg, bortsett fra sin status som en eksil-øy. Øya er på en måte et omvendt panoptikon. Det er denne synligheten utstillingen henspeiler på og som kan oppfattes som gjemsel i full åpenhet. Han skrev også en lenger betenkning som du også kan lese i denne katalogen. I forbindelse med utstillingen viste vi filmen Tameksaout av filmskaperen Ivan Boccara. Gjennom flere år med studier og fordypning har Boccara fulgt flere berberfamilier og ulike samfunnsprosesser i Atlasfjellene i Marokko. I denne filmen fra 2005 følger vi en gjeterfamilie der hverdagen vel så gjerne dreier seg om å holde liv i ilden som å mate husdyrene. Filmen er et sakte portrett av tre generasjoner som står overfor en verden i endring.

I tillegg til de seks utstillingene som er beskrevet over så har vi som sedvane invitert to masterstudenter fra Kunsthøgskolen i Bergen til å lage Masterhelger. Vårens kunststudent var Sol Hallset som i utstillingen Belonging. Becoming. Being. konfronterte oss med spørsmålet "hva vil det si å være menneske?" gjennom en enkel tegning av en menneskefigur. Hallset forstørret figurens proporsjoner til å passe inn mellom gulv og tak i utstillingssalen, og på den måten kom hennes diskusjon til syne. Å være menneske handler ikke bare om forholdet mellom sitt eget indre og en ytre overflate eller fasade, men også om relasjonen til andre mennesker. Ikke bare er vi opptatt av hvordan vi fremstår utad, hvordan andre oppfatter oss, vi foretar også stadige sammenligninger der vi måler oss selv opp mot dem vi omgås. Høstens kunststudent var Therese Hoen som i sin utstilling Rammen består ikke av noe annet enn akkurat dette tok utgangspunkt i en betenkning omkring et hus. Etter en prosess der en rekke mennesker tegnet sine egne plantegninger av ett og samme hus skapte hun et verk løsrevet fra tema som eiendom og eierskap. Huset ble i utstillingen holdt sammen av minner og skjøre porselensbeslag, og dermed skapte hun en ny plantegning publikum kunne tre inn i.

Hordaland kunstsenter har som tradisjon å involvere yngre kunstnere, og den siste tiden har vi også invitert inn unge kunsthistorikere til å delta i våre aktiviteter. Vi ser at ved å være åpne for andre enn kunstneres blikk på kunst og dets domene utvider vi diskusjonen på en måte som gagner alle parter. I tillegg til de som har bidratt med betenkninger omkring kunst i forbindelse med utstillingene, så har altså unge kunsthistorikere presentert sine prosjekter og sin forskning for et åpent publikum i serien forelesninger Masterkveld. På den måten ønsker vi også å skape møter mellom studenter og profesjonelle aktører innenfor kunstfeltet og å etablere tettere kontakt mellom det akademiske og det praktiske kunstlivet i Bergen.

I tillegg til å være en formidlingsinstitusjon er Hordaland kunstsenter altså også et fagsenter. Dette er særlig tydelig i vår deltagelse i B-open, der vi legger til rette for at åpne atelier og seminar blir avviklet. I år hadde hele programmet samme overskrift som tittelen på seminaret: Å produsere en kunstscene. Så som i fjor har vi i år også invitert inn en observatør til seminaret, og dette var litteratur- og kunstkritiker Susanne Christensen. Hennes tekst har vi også tatt med i denne katalogen.

Vi ønsker hele tiden å bidra til diskusjon og kontinuerlig å være sjenerøse med de tankene som oppstår innefor vårt rammeverk. Derfor ber vi alle gjester i vårt gjesteprogram om å holde en presentasjon av sitt eget arbeid, et tema de er interessert i eller hvilke planer de har mens de er i Bergen. Vi har blitt presentert for et bredt spekter av aktiviteter og tanker, og til og med blitt invitert med på piknik. Våre gjester i 2010 har vært: Hyunjin Kim (kurator, Sør-Korea), Margret Holz (kunstner, Tyskland), Daniela Castro (skribent og kurator, Brasil), Marco Bruzzone (kunstner, Italia/Tyskland), Bertram Haude (kunstner, Tyskland), Juan Andres Gaitán (kunsthistoriker og kurator, Canada/Nederland), Maija Rudovska (kunsthisoriker og kurator, Latvia), Cécile Belmont (kunstner, Frankrike/Tyskland), Johan Lundh (kurator, Sverige) og LeRoy Stevens (kunstner, USA).

I tillegg til å legge til rette for offentlig debatt, ønsker vi også å være et romslig sted som gir plass til ulike utforskinger. Gjennom et samarbeid med to andre institusjoner, Baltic Art Center – BAC i Visby og Fabrikken for Kunst og Design, FFKD i København, har vi opprettet et Collaborative Research Residency der en gruppe på tre samarbeidspartnere kan samles i en måned for å forske på et selvvalgt tema. Den første gruppen som ble ønsket velkommen i Bergen var Miriam Fumarola, Marti Manen og Katarina Stenkvist som satt seg fore å undersøke muligheten for ny tenkning omkring kjønn og representasjon innefor kunstinstitusjonen. Som gjest inviterte de Olav Fumarola Unsgaard. Sammen ønsker de å utforme praktiske og fungerende metoder ved å studere hvordan ulike former for diskriminerende maktstrukturer samhandler, og i desember holder de både presentasjon og workshop for et interessert publikum. På BAC var Namik Mackic, Samir M’kadmi og Camilla Shim Winge og på FFKD var Andjeas Ejiksson, Virginija Januškevi?i?t? og Valentinas Klimašauskas.

Også i år har vi hatt et vitne som har fulgt oss gjennom hele året. Kunstneren Anne Marthe Dyvi, som gikk ut fra masterprogrammet på Kunsthøgskolen i Bergen i år, har gjort seg opp en del tanker omkring hva Hordaland kunstsenter er og kan være i sin tekst Promemoria.

Avslutningsvis kan det være verdt å nevne at vi i 2011 kommer til å fortsette med utstillinger, presentasjoner og gjesteprogram, men at vi i tillegg vil fokusere på at det er Hordaland kunstsenters 35. år, og vi ønsker alle velkommen til et jubileumsprogram som manifesterer seg gjennom hele året!

Retrospective Catalogue 2010 is the collection of commissioned texts accompanying Hordaland Art Centre's exhibitions, as well as documentation of all the exhibitions with the witness report on the 2010 programme written by artist Anne Marthe Dyvi.

Through six exhibitions and two Master Weekends, there has been a subtle discussion of how art is an intrinsic part of society at Hordaland Art Centre. Together with artists, curators, writers and of course the audience we have let different views play freely, and as summary we offer this retrospective catalogue both in print and online. We want our common production to be avaliable to as many people as possible, at the same time as this is a way of turning both the Art Centre and its archives inside out into the public where we participate actively. The catalogue is designed by Ole Kristian Øye at Klipp og Lim.
www.kunstsenter.no

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

Art is also reality
Foreword to Retrospective Catalogue 2010.

There is a language which operates outside both theory and the private sphere, even next to politics. This is the language of society, a language that should be encouraged and developed. This language is spoken by all societies, and it possesses the power to change society itself. One of its dialects is art. Art can speak with a political accent, an intimate accent, a poetic accent, a philosophical accent, as well as many other accents, but it must never surrender its own dialect.

This year's program has provided space for artists who through their works have discussed issues arising from other societal dialects, such as history, geography, literature, architecture and design, but without surrendering their own voice. Through six exhibitions and many other events we have observed the world of today, and this year's Retrospective catalogue, the second of its kind, once more turns the year inside out so we can observe them as a whole. This totality is the voice of Hordaland Art Centre in society – a voice that can only be discovered through cooperation with artists and other thinkers.

The year began with Sveinung Rudjord Unneland's solo exhibition, Palinca Pastorale, consisting of several works put together in the form of a discussion. All these works were aesthetically pleasing and balanced, though sketches of torture chambers and questionable production methods were lurking just beneath the surface. Artist Thomas Hestvold was commissioned to write a reflection on Unneland's works for the exhibition. Hestvold does more than that, through art he envisages the potential for general reflections. Such as: Let it be clear: Doubt and scepticism are the prime prerequisites for cultural and intellectual development. Where distrust, criticism and wry looks are suppressed, you get stagnation, surveillance and terror. As a conclusion to this exhibition period, Paul Otto Brunstad, priest, academic and author, was asked to talk about how borders divide and unite, simultaneously functioning as stop points and meeting points, and how limitations are the birth place, both of hope and creativity.

In January, Hordaland Art Centre also was invited to Umeå, Sweden, to recreate the 2009 exhibition DIG IT, thus becoming the first Outside project of the year. Aided by our hosts, the artist-run gallery Verkligheten, curator Linus Elmes and I, assembled works that the artists themselves consider important to their work. Once again, we had a collection of works reflecting a variety of political, social or ideological attitudes, and considering the importance they still have for their owners, they provided a close reading of how artists relate to a more informal visual practice. DIG IT is a flexible exhibition situation, and through the constant moving about, endless iconographical geographies are constructed. The artistic practices of Anna Eliasson, Per Enoksson, Rebecka Adelhult Feklistoff, Kent Gustafsson, Ida Hansson, Johanna Larsson, Allan Mattsson and Ulla Thøgersen take shape against the backdrop of these works, at least in part.

The exhibition of a single work by Hamdi Attia, curated by Abdellah Karroum, became the second solo exhibitions this spring. Entitled Archipelago, a World Map, it presented a fictional world encompassing arguments about what representations hide or reveal, the relationship between history and geography, as well as the role of artists in society. Cartographic fragments of Palestinian terretories created an image of a potential world. Through his interview with the artist, Karroum reveals how this work can be viewed in connection with a long-term commitment. One of the claims made is, What separates art from activism, is the degree of poetic expression. Matthew Flintham, the British researcher and artist, lectured on his long-term research project Parallel Landscapes, where he discusses physical and invisible aspects of military power projections, the mapping of territories, and how the state positions itself, with particular reference to the United Kingdom.

The third solo exhibition was Vanna Bowles' Wild Tree, where we encounter a universe of drawing. The exhibition was directly tied in with fiction, and as the creation of the works for the exhibition progressed, author and artist Linn Cecilie Ulvin produced texts that were partly a part of the exhibition, but that could partly be read independently of it, such as the longish text, Det utilgivelige, angeren og historier om den tause skogen (The unforgivable, remorse and histories about the silent forest), which can be found in this catalogue. Through a number of observations, we witness someone walking away: She looks around. She has never been in this area before. What if she doesn’t run into a single soul for weeks? She cannot expect help from anyone in the forest. If she needs help, she must go back the same way she came. But she can’t go back. Not now. Now everyone knows about her infatuation. What would she do in town? Stagger around the streets on her own? A book was also published in connection with this exhibition. The artist James Webb was asked to re-narrate his exhibition One day, all of this will be yours, which had recently been on show at Blank Projects in Cape Town; thus we gathered different artists' views on narrative; Bowles' fragmented and associative approach, and Webb's, which was strictly chronological.

After the summer break, we set out to explore artistic collaboration through a series of three exhibitions, each of them created by two artists, to explore how this collaboration might manifest itself. First, a general observation: The projects became broader, reaching beyond the walls of our exhibition space. A common denominator of all these exhibitions is that preparations have involved journeys and movement.

First off the mark were Lutz-Rainer Müller and Stian Ådlandsvik with their two-part exhibition You only tell me you love me when you're drunk, where one part was presented at Hordaland Art Centre and the other at 67 Holmedalshammaren, Askøy, near Bergen. The artists turned the house at 67 Holmedalshammaren into a sculpture. This house was from a different era, having been built during the winter of 1956–57. In the old days, houses were built for eternity, while these days homes have become an investment, more than a dear necessity. At least according to the media, where talk about properties is just as much talk about money. As Norway has changed from a nation of sensible rationing of most things to a country of extreme opulence, our relationship with our surroundings has changed, as well. The two artists created a model of the house and sent it around the world, poorly wrapped up. The model travelled via Beijing to Sydney, New York and Paris. The sculpture at Askøy is a recreation of the model as it appeared on its return. The materials that were removed from 67 Holmedalshammaren, have been used to create the exhibition at Hordaland Art Centre. The German curator Petra Reichensperger wrote the text Rapporter fra Hinterland (Dispatches from the Hinterland) for this project, where she, among other things, described how the artists consider unpredictability a quality in itself. One night during the exhibition period, people were invited to a site specific lecture by art historian Eva Rem Hansen and artist and curator Randi Grov Berger in the garage at 67 Holmedalshammaren. They discussed the place of the sculpture, and the project as a whole, both as part of artistic tradition, but also in specific political discussions about local land-use planning and the establishment of industries.

During September we had our second Outside project of the year, Knitting Concert by Victoria Brännström. This work, which was presented on a Saturday morning at the Grieg Hall, was an experimental sound work, as well as being a feminist action. As the result of long-term collaboration with Bergen Husflidslag (Bergen Folk Art and Craft Association), the artist assembled a group of some 40 women who were asked to knit a concert. The concert was produced by placing the women in an orchestra-like formation with microphones fastened to their knitting needles while they knitted, directed by Halldis Rønning and transformed by DJ Ingrid Grønli Åm. During the last couple of years, Brännström's focus has been on investigating different kinds of hierarchies, also the status of traditional female tasks and crafts in today's world. So as to underline the themes she is working on at any given time, she has also infused the processes she employs during her work with separatist feminist methods. This also characterizes the process employed in the project Knitting Concert. The product is just as important for traditional handicrafts as for modern production, but in the case of crafts and handicrafts, the associations to the process leading towards the result point in quite different directions than just the result. The time involved, the motivation required to reach the destination, as well as one's desire and memories, are important associations that are brought into play during this performance. Ethnologist Ingrid Birce Müftüo?lu was present at the concert and has written the text Women, hands and knitting needles. She writes, These clicking sounds, which neither will nor can string together into meaningful words, make a refined counterpoint to the idea of knitting as a female art of craft. During the struggle for women's liberation in the 1970s, knitting and other traditional female activities were harnessed to shape the contents of a new female culture. This was the decade when the concept of politics was widened.

Next, during the second exhibition of the autumn, we were presented with the universe inhabited by Øyvind Renberg and Miho Shimizu: Upstream. They are always concerned with analyzing our relationship with the world of images and the mass-produced objects surrounding us. This exhibition presented both old and new works, as well as studies for future works. Thus they pointed both backwards and forwards in time. While all the works were presented in a black gallery space. Upstream pointed forwards as they have been involved in a travelling residency in Hardanger, in order to create a work, an Asian picture scroll for Hordaland Art Centre's Outside series next year. In preparation for this future work they have, among other things, taken a closer look at the stereotypical view of nature so common in Norway, and how our visual memory has largely been influenced by mass-produced photographs. In her text Upstream: The Dérive within the Immersion, curator and writer Denise Carvalho writes: It serves as a matrix to rethink ideas of relationships, environmental awareness, visual perception, and performative experience. Here, storytelling can be both historically oriented and organically re-contextualized as narrative, with a beginning and an end. Their watercolours, for example, show a post-humanist narrative in which birds and animals from the region gather to help each other from drowning against a seascape of melting glaziers and majestic flaming skies, a clear critique on a manmade environmental disaster. One of their earlier works, the china set Rio, produced by Figgjo, could be seen at the exhibition, as well as purchased from the coffee shop Sakristiet, at Bryggen. Thus, this exhibition also had a life outside the gallery. In connection with the exhibition, anthropologist Charlotte Bik Bandlien presented an introduction to the dynamic interaction between the ethnographic turn in art and the representational crisis in anthropology.

During the autumn, Hordaland Art Centre co-curated the exhibition Zwischenraum: Space Between at Kunstverein Hamburg in Germany, in association with SWG3 of Glasgow. Thus this became our third Outside project of the year. This was another exploration of collaboration, both between institutions, between the participating artists: Oliver Bulas, Nick Evans, Julia Horstmann, Alon Levin, Cato Løland, Ingrid Lønningdal and Ciara Phillips, as well as other invited guests. Through a number of meetings between curators Annette Hans, Jamie Kenyon and myself, we developed a framework for the artists who were invited to attend, which gradually turned into a residency programme. The format was presented to the public in these words: A known unknown is something we know that we don't know. Inviting a number of artists to inhabit an art institution for a set amount of time is to invite uncertainty and the unknown into the exhibition space. Having decided not to impose a thematic connection between the works in this exhibition, we knew that each artist's urge to create and participate would be manifested, and art would happen, but at the same time we knew that we wouldn’t know what kind of creations, contributions and works would happen. We use the word "happen" deliberately, as the exhibition that welcomes you has been created on a residency platform which is both a part of the process prior to and a part of the exhibition. Thus the artists themselves are present within the framework of the exhibition. Due to this platform, it becomes possible for them to influence the exhibition, also while the public has access to it. During the six week long exhibition period, the exhibition was installed twice, underwent minor changes throughout the whole period, and was accompanied by an extensive side programme, including lectures and reading circles created as a joint effort by the artists, curators and the hosting institution.

The last exhibition of the year was Leila by de artist duo aiPotu, the artists Anders Kjellesvik and Andreas Siqueland. Various concepts of inaccessibility connected with land areas, history, old traditions and knowledge were discussed through a series of sculptures inside the exhibition room as well as an extensive alteration to the exterior of Hordaland Art Centre. Like the two other duo exhibitions, this one also started with a journey. In March of 2009 the artists were challenged to visit the island Leila in the Strait of Gibraltar, in view of their ongoing project, The Island Tour. They made the journey, but they never reached their destination. The island has been a no-man's land since 2002, when a conflict over sovereignty nearly turned into a military confrontation between Spain and Morocco. The island is still under close military surveillance, and it is known by several official names: The origin of the Moroccan name Leila is the Spanish word "La Isla", meaning "the island". The Spanish refer to the island as parsley – "Perejil”, while the Berber name is "Tura", meaning "empty". The exhibition invited artist and critic Zachary Cahill to offer his thoughts about the project; his review was available already at the opening, saying among other things, The island appears to be unremarkable enough, save for its peculiar status as an island in exile. The island is, in a sense, a reverse panopticon. It is this quality of visibility to which the exhibition alludes, which may be thought of as hiding in plain sight. He wrote a longer reflection, as well, also printed in this catalogue. In connection with this exhibition, we screened the film Tameksaout by the film-maker Ivan Boccara. Throughout years of studies and immersion in the subject, Boccara has kept track of several Berber families and different social processes in the Atlas Mountains of Morocco. This film from 2005 portrays a shepherd family where feeding the animals is not the only everyday concern, but also to keep the fire alive. The film is a slow-moving portrait of three generations faced with a changing world.

Besides the six exhibitions described above, we have made a tradition of asking two MA students from Bergen National Academy of the Arts to create a Master's weekend. In the spring, art student Sol Hallset presented her exhibition Belonging. Becoming. Being, which, in the shape of a simple drawing of a human figure, confronted us with the question, "what does it mean to be human". Hallset enlarged the proportions of the figure to fit between ceiling and roof in the exhibition space, thus making her discussion visible. Being human is not just a question about the relationship between one's inner self and an outer surface or facade, but also about one's relationship to other people. We are concerned, not just with our outward appearance and how others perceive us, we are also constantly comparing ourselves with our surroundings. This autumn's art student was Therese Hoen; in her exhibition, The frame consists of nothing but this, a reflection about a house served as her starting point. Following a process where a number of people drew their own plans of the same house, she created a work without allusions to themes like property and ownership. At the exhibition, this house was held together by memories and fragile armatures made of china, creating a new plan of the house which people could step into.

Involving young artists is a tradition at Hordaland Art Centre, and recently we have also invited young art historians to add to our activities. We have noticed that by asking non-artists to scrutinize art and its domain, we get a wider discussion, one that is of use to all involved parties. Besides those who have contributed their reflections on art in connection with exhibitions, young art historians have presented their projects and research findings to an open audience during a series of lectures called Master's Night. Thus we would like to create a meeting ground for students and professionals within the art scene, and facilitate closer contact between the academic scene and art practice in Bergen.

In addition to being an institution exhibiting and communicating art, Hordaland Art Centre is also a centre for professional debate. This becomes particularly obvious during B-open, where we coordinate open studios and seminars. This year the entire programme had the same title as the seminar: To produce an art scene. Like last year, we invited an observer to attend the seminar – Susanne Christensen, literary and art critic. Her text is also included in this catalogue.

We always want to contribute to discussion and be ever generous with the thoughts arising within our sphere. And so we invite all our guests from the residency programme to talk about their work, a theme that is of special interest to them, or their plans for the future, as they visit Bergen. We have been presented with a wide range of activities and reflections, indeed, we have even been invited on a picnic. During 2010 our guests have been: Hyunjin Kim (curator, South Korea), Margret Holz (artist, Germany), Daniela Castro (writer and curator, Brazil), Marco Bruzzone (artist, Italy/Germany), Bertram Haude (artist, Germany), Juan Andres Gaitán (art historian and curator, Canada/Holland), Maija Rudovska (art historian and curator, Latvia), Cécile Belmont (artist, France/Germany), Johan Lundh (curator, Sweden) and LeRoy Stevens (artist, USA).

In addition to facilitating public debate, we also want to be an open-minded place with space for different explorations. Our collaboration with two other institutions, Baltic Art Center – BAC in Visby and The Factory of Art & Design, FFKD in Copenhagen, has resulted in the creation of a Collaborative Research Residency where a group consisting of three collaborationg partners come together for a month to research and investigate a subject of their own choosing. The first group to be welcomed to Bergen was Miriam Fumarola, Marti Manen and Katarina Stenkvist, who set about investigating the possibility of new thinking about gender and representation within the art institution. They invited Olav Fumarola Unsgaard to be their guest. Together they want to develop viable methods by studying the interaction of different forms of discriminatory power structures, and during December they will both lead a presentation and hold a workshop for members of the public who are interested in the subject. Namik Mackic, Samir M’kadmi and Camilla Shim Winge visited BAC, and Andjeas Ejiksson, Virginija Januškevi?i?t? and Valentinas Klimašauskas visited FFKD.

Once again this year, we have had a witness, someone who has observed the institution throughout the year. The artist Anne Marthe Dyvi, who graduated from Bergen National Academy of the Arts this year, has presented her reflections about Hordaland Art Centre, what it is and might be, in the text Promemoria (Memo).

In closing, let it be said that we will continue our exhibitions, presentations and residency programmes in 2011, but on top of all that, we will mark Hordaland Art Centre's 35th anniversary. We wish you all welcome to a jubilee programme which will manifest itself throughout the whole year!

Translated from the Norwegian by Egil Fredheim

---------
---------
NORSK
--------
--------

Kunst er også virkelig
Forord til Retrospektiv katalog 2010

Det finnes et språk utenfor både teori og den private sfæren, til og med til siden for politikk. Det er samfunnets språk, et språk som burde bli oppmuntret og utviklet. Dette språket snakkes av alle samfunn, og har kraft til å endre det. Kunst er en av dialektene. Kunst kan snakke med en politisk aksent, en intim aksent, en poetisk aksent, en filosofisk aksent, og mange andre aksenter, men må aldri gi opp sin egen dialekt.

I årets program har vi gitt plass til kunstnere som gjennom sine verk har diskutert tema knyttet til andre dialekter i samfunnet, slik som historie, geografi, litteratur, arkitektur og formgiving, men uten å miste sin egen stemme. Gjennom seks utstillinger og mange andre programposter har vi sett på verden vi lever i i dag, og i årets Retrospektiv katalog, den andre i rekken, vrenger vi igjen året inn ut slik at vi kan ta en titt på disse som en helhet. Denne helheten er Hordaland kunstsenters stemme i samfunnet. En stemme vi bare kan finne i samarbeid med kunstnere og andre tenkere.

Året startet med Sveinung Rudjord Unnelands første separatutstilling Palinca Pastorale, der flere arbeider ble satt sammen til én diskusjon. Alle verkene i utstillingen framsto som estetiske og balanserte, mens det rett under overflaten lusket plantegninger av torturkammer og tvilsomme produksjonsmetoder. Til utstillingen fikk kunstner Thomas Hestvold i oppgave å formulere en betenkning omkring Unnelands arbeider. Hestvold går lenger, gjennom kunsten ser han muligheten for å formulere noe generelt. Blant annet: La oss bare slå det fast: Tvil og skepsis er den viktigste forutsetningen for kulturell og intellektuell utvikling. Der hvor mistro, kritikk og skeive blikk undertrykkes får man stagnasjon, overvåking og terror. For å konkludere denne utstillingsperioden ble prest, forsker og forfatter Paul Otto Brunstad invitert til å snakke om hvordan grenser skiller og forener, danner stoppunkt og møtepunkter på samme tid, og hvordan begrensningene er håpet og nyskapelsens fødested.

I januar var Hordaland kunstsenter invitert til Umeå i Sverige for å gjenskape utstillingen DIG IT fra 2009, som dermed ble årets første Utenforprosjekt. Gjennom vertskapet, det kunstnerdrevne galleriet Verkligheten, samlet kurator Linus Elmes og undertegnede igjen sammen verk som kunstnere selv mener er viktige for sin praksis. Igjen ble det en samling verk som har ulike sosiale, politiske eller ideologiske utgangspunkt og som med den innflytelsen de fortsetter å ha for sine eiere gir oss muligheten å nærlese hvordan kunstnere forholder seg til en mer uformell visuell praksis. Utstillingssituasjonen DIG IT er fleksibel og gjennom stadig flytting konstrueres uendelige ikonografiske geografier. Det er til dels på bakgrunn av innflytelsen disse verkene har utøvet at kunstnernes (Anna Eliasson, Per Enoksson, Rebecka Adelhult Feklistoff, Kent Gustafsson, Ida Hansson, Johanna Larsson, Allan Mattsson og Ulla Thøgersen) praksis avtegner seg.

Den andre i serien på tre separatutstillinger på våren var visningen av ett enkelt verk av Hamdi Attia, kuratert av Abdellah Karroum. Med tittelen Archipelago, a World Map fikk vi presentert en fiktiv verden som rommer diskusjoner om hva representasjoner skjuler eller avslører, forholdet mellom historie og geografi, og hvilken rolle kunstneren spiller i samfunnet. Kartelementer av palestinske landområder skapte et bilde av en potensiell verden. Gjennom et intervju med kunstneren viser Karroum hvordan dette verket kan ses i sammenheng med et langvarig engasjement. En av påstandene som blir framsatt er at Det som skiller kunst fra aktivisme, er graden av poetisk uttrykk. Den britiske forskeren og kunstneren Matthew Flintham foreleste om sitt langvarige forskningsprosjekt Parallel Landscapes der han diskuterer fysiske og usynlige aspekter av militær maktprojeksjon, kartlegging av territorier og hvordan statsmakten innretter seg i landskapet, spesielt i Storbritannia.

Den tredje i rekken av separatutstillinger var Vanna Bowles’ Wild Tree, der vi ble møtt av et tegnet univers. Utstillingen forholdt seg direkte til fiksjonen, og parallelt med utstillingens framvekst skrev kunstner og forfatter Linn Cecilie Ulvin tekster som delvis var del av utstillingen, delvis kunne leses separat, slik som den lengre teksten Det utilgivelige, angeren og historier om den tause skogen som du også kan lese i denne katalogen. Gjennom en rekke observasjoner følger vi en vandring bort: Hun ser seg omkring. Hun har aldri vært i dette området før. Hva hvis hun ikke støter på en sjel på flere uker? I skogen kan hun ikke forvente hjelp av noen. Skal hun ha hjelp, må hun gå tilbake samme veien hun kom fra. Men hun kan ikke gå tilbake. Ikke nå. Nå vet alle om forelskelsen hennes. Hva skulle hun gjøre i byen? Rave alene omkring i gatene? I forbindelse med utstillingen ble det også publisert en bok. Kunstneren James Webb ble invitert til å gjenfortelle sin egen utstilling One day, all of this will be yours, som nettopp hadde blitt vist på Blank Projects i Cape Town, og på den måten nøstet vi sammen ulike kunstneres oppfatninger av det narrative; Bowles’ fragmenterte og assosiative med Webbs strengt kronologiske.

Etter sommeren satte vi oss fore å undersøke kunstnerisk samarbeid i en rekke på tre utstillinger, der hver utstilling ble laget i samarbeid mellom to kunstnere, for på den måten å se hvilke uttrykk dette kunne føre til. En generell observasjon er at prosjektene ble mer omfattende, og strakk seg fysisk ut av vårt eget utstillingslokale. Alle disse utstillingene har hatt til felles at forberedelsene har innebåret reiser og forflytning.

Først ut var Lutz-Rainer Müller og Stian Ådlandsvik med den todelte utstillingen You only tell me you love me when you're drunk, der én del var på Hordaland kunstsenter og den andre var på Holmedalshammaren 67 på Askøy utenfor Bergen. Kunstnerne gjorde huset på adressen Holmedalshammaren 67 om til en skulptur. Huset tilhørte en annen tid, da det ble bygget vinteren 1956/57. Før i tiden bygget man hus for evigheten, mens hus og bolig i dag har endret seg fra å være en kjær nødvendighet til et investeringsobjekt. I hvert fall hvis man skal tro mediene, der boligstoff handler vel så mye om økonomi. Etter hvert som Norge har endret status, fra en nasjon med fornuftige rasjoneringer på det meste til et land med ekstrem overflod, har også vårt forhold til våre omgivelser endret seg. Kunstnerne bygde en modell av huset som de sendte jorden rundt i dårlig emballasje. Den reiste via Beijing, Sydney, New York City og Paris. Skulpturen på Askøy er en gjenskaping av modellen slik den så ut da den kom tilbake. De materialene som er fjernet fra Holmedalshammaren 67, er brukt til å lage utstillingen på Hordaland kunstsenter. Den tyske kuratoren Petra Reichensperger skrev teksten Rapporter fra Hinterland til dette prosjektet der hun blant annet beskrev hvordan kunstnerne ser uforutsigbarheten som en kvalitet. En kveld i utstillingsperioden ble det inviterte til et stedsspesifikt foredrag ved kunsthistoriker Eva Rem Hansen og kunstner og kurator Randi Grov Berger i garasjen på Holmedalshammaren 67. De to diskuterte hvordan skulpturen og prosjektet som helhet plasserte seg i både en kunstnerisk tradisjon, men også i spesifikke lokalpolitiske diskusjoner om både arealplaner og industriutvikling.

I september gjennomførte vi årets andre Utenforprosjekt: Strikkekonsert av Victoria Brännström. Verket som ble framført en lørdag formiddag i Grieghallen var både et eksperimentelt lydarbeid, samtidig som det var en feministisk handling. Gjennom et langvarig samarbeid med Bergen Husflidslag samlet kunstneren en gruppe på ca. 40 kvinner som fikk i oppgave å strikke en konsert. Den ble skapt gjennom at kvinnene satt i en orkesterlignende formasjon med mikrofoner festet til strikkepinnene mens de strikket, og at lyden som ble dirigert fram av Halldis Rønning ble bearbeidet av DJ Ingrid Grønli Åm. Brännström har de siste årene konsentrert seg om å undersøke ulike former for hierarkier, og blant annet sett nærmere på hvilken status tradisjonelt kvinnelige oppgaver og håndarbeid har i dag. Hun har også benyttet seg av kvinneseparatistiske metoder for i prosessen med arbeidene å understreke den tematikken hun tar for seg til enhver tid. Det er også tilfellet for prosessen med prosjektet Strikkekonsert. For tradisjonelle håndverk står produktet i like stor fokus som for moderne produksjon, men assosiasjonene til prosessen som leder mot resultatet for håndverk og håndarbeid peker i helt andre retninger enn bare mot resultatet. Tiden arbeidet tar, drivkraften man må ha for å nå målet, lyst og minner er sterke assosiasjoner som hentes fram i denne performancen. Kulturviter Ingrid Birce Müftüo?lu var tilstede og har skreve teksten Kvinner, hender og pinner der hun skriver: De smattende lydene som ikke vil eller kan forme seg til forståelige ord er kontrapunktiske med forestillingen om stikking som et av de kvinnelige håndarbeider. I den feministiske kampen for kvinnefrigjøring på 1970-tallet, ble strikking og annet tradisjonelt kvinnearbeid benyttet for å formulere innholdet i en ny kvinnekultur. Dette var tiåret da politikkbegrepet ble utvidet.

Deretter fikk vi stifte bekjentskap med universet til Øyvind Renberg og Miho Shimizu i høstens andre utstilling: Upstream. De to er til daglig opptatt av å analysere vårt forhold til den bildeverden og de masseproduserte objektene vi omgir oss med. Denne utstillingen viste både tidligere og nye arbeider, i tillegg til studier for framtidige verk. På den måten pekte de både bakover og framover i tid, og alle verk ble iscenesatt i et sort gallerirom. Upstream pekte framover da de har vært engasjert i et omreisende residency i Hardanger for å skape et verk, en asiatisk bilderull, til Hordaland kunstsenters Utenfor-serie neste år. Til det kommende verket har de blant annet sett nærmere på den stereotype oppfatningen av natur i Norge og hvor sterkt forankret vår visuelle hukommelse er påvirket av massereproduserte fotografier. Kurator og skribent Denise Carvalho skriver i teksten Upstream: Fordypning med drift om bilderullen: Den tjener som en matrise for å revurdere forestillinger om relasjoner, miljøbevissthet, visuell persepsjon og performativ erfaring. Her kan fortellingen være både historisk orientert og (organisk) rekontekstualisert som fortelling, med begynnelse og slutt. Akvarellene demonstrerer for eksempel en posthumanistisk handlingsgang der regionens fugler og dyr går sammen om å redde hverandre fra drukningsdøden, representert ved et hav av smeltende isbreer og glødende himmel, en tydelig kritikk av en menneskeskapt miljøkatastrofe. Et av deres tidligere verk, porselensserviset Rio produsert av Figgjo, var både del av utstillingen og til salgs hos kafeen Sakristiet på Bryggen. På den måten levde også denne utstillingen utenfor gallerirommet. I forbindelse med utstillingen fikk vi også en innføring i dynamikken mellom den etnografiske vendingen i kunsten og representasjonskrisen i antropologien av antropolog Charlotte Bik Bandlien.

I løpet av høsten fungerte Horaland kunstsener som medkurator for utstillingen Zwischenraum: Space Between på Kunstverein Hamburg i Tyskland, i samarbeid med SWG3 i Glasgow. Denne ble dermed vårt tredje Utenforprosjekt i år. Også her ble samarbeid utforsket, både institusjonelt, mellom kunstnerne som deltok: Oliver Bulas, Nick Evans, Julia Horstmann, Alon Levin, Cato Løland, Ingrid Lønningdal og Ciara Phillips, og andre inviterte gjester. Gjennom en rekke møter mellom kuratorene Annette Hans, Jamie Kenyon og undertegnede ble det utviklet et rammeverk for de kunstnerne som ble invitert til å delta, som etter hvert like mye ble et gjestekunstnerprogram. I invitasjonen til publikum ble dette formatet formidlet slik: En kjent ukjent er noe vi vet at vi ikke vet. Ved å invitere en rekke kunstnere til å bebo en kunstinstitusjon i en avgrenset periode, er det som å invitere det usikre og ukjente inn i utstillingslokalet. Ved å utelate enhver forutsatt tematisk sammenheng mellom arbeidene i denne utstillingen, visste vi at kunstnernes trang til å skape og delta ville bli tydelig, og kunst ville oppstå, men samtidig visste vi lite om hva slags skapelser, deltagelser og arbeider som ville skje. Og når vi bruker ordet ”skje” så er det tilsiktet, siden utstillingen du nå ønskes velkommen inn i er skapt på en gjestekunstnerplattform som er både del av forarbeidet, og fortsatt del av utstillingen. Dermed er også kunstnerne selv tilstede i rammeverket for utstillingen. Muligheten de har for å påvirke utstillingen, også i den tiden publikum har tilgang, er takket være denne plattformen. I løpet av utstillingsperioden på seks uker ble utstillingen montert to ganger, utsatt for mindre endringer gjennom hele perioden i tillegg til å få et omfattende sideprogram med forelesninger og lesesirkler skapt i samarbeid mellom kunstnerne, kuratorene og vertsinstitusjonen.

Årets siste utstilling var Leila av kunstnerduoen aiPotu, som er de to kunstnerne Anders Kjellesvik og Andreas Siqueland. Gjennom en rekke skulpturer inne i utstillingsrommet og en omfattende endring av Hordaland kunstsenters ytre, ble ulike utilgjengelighetsbegrep knyttet til landområder, historie, gamle tradisjoner og kunnskap problematisert. På samme måte som de to andre duoutstillingene så startet også denne med en reise. Det var på bakgrunn av aiPotus pågående prosjekt The Island Tour at de i mars 2009 ble utfordret til å oppsøke øya Leila i Gibraltarstredet. Reisen ble gjennomført, men målet ble aldri nådd. Øya har siden 2002 vært et ingenmannsland da en suverenitetskonflikt mellom Spania og Marokko nesten endte i en militær konfrontasjon. Øyen er fortsatt strengt militært bevoktet, og den har flere offisielle navn: Det marokkanske navnet Leila stammer fra det spanske ordet ”La Isla” som betyr ”øyen”. På spansk blir øya referert til som persille – ”Perejil”, mens den på berbersk har navnet ”Tura”, som betyr ”tom”. Til utstillingen ble kunstneren og kritikeren Zach Cahill invitert til å gjøre seg opp tanker omkring prosjektet, og allerede til åpningen forelå hans anmeldelse der vi blant annet kunne lese: Øya gjør ikke noe videre av seg, bortsett fra sin status som en eksil-øy. Øya er på en måte et omvendt panoptikon. Det er denne synligheten utstillingen henspeiler på og som kan oppfattes som gjemsel i full åpenhet. Han skrev også en lenger betenkning som du også kan lese i denne katalogen. I forbindelse med utstillingen viste vi filmen Tameksaout av filmskaperen Ivan Boccara. Gjennom flere år med studier og fordypning har Boccara fulgt flere berberfamilier og ulike samfunnsprosesser i Atlasfjellene i Marokko. I denne filmen fra 2005 følger vi en gjeterfamilie der hverdagen vel så gjerne dreier seg om å holde liv i ilden som å mate husdyrene. Filmen er et sakte portrett av tre generasjoner som står overfor en verden i endring.

I tillegg til de seks utstillingene som er beskrevet over så har vi som sedvane invitert to masterstudenter fra Kunsthøgskolen i Bergen til å lage Masterhelger. Vårens kunststudent var Sol Hallset som i utstillingen Belonging. Becoming. Being. konfronterte oss med spørsmålet "hva vil det si å være menneske?" gjennom en enkel tegning av en menneskefigur. Hallset forstørret figurens proporsjoner til å passe inn mellom gulv og tak i utstillingssalen, og på den måten kom hennes diskusjon til syne. Å være menneske handler ikke bare om forholdet mellom sitt eget indre og en ytre overflate eller fasade, men også om relasjonen til andre mennesker. Ikke bare er vi opptatt av hvordan vi fremstår utad, hvordan andre oppfatter oss, vi foretar også stadige sammenligninger der vi måler oss selv opp mot dem vi omgås. Høstens kunststudent var Therese Hoen som i sin utstilling Rammen består ikke av noe annet enn akkurat dette tok utgangspunkt i en betenkning omkring et hus. Etter en prosess der en rekke mennesker tegnet sine egne plantegninger av ett og samme hus skapte hun et verk løsrevet fra tema som eiendom og eierskap. Huset ble i utstillingen holdt sammen av minner og skjøre porselensbeslag, og dermed skapte hun en ny plantegning publikum kunne tre inn i.

Hordaland kunstsenter har som tradisjon å involvere yngre kunstnere, og den siste tiden har vi også invitert inn unge kunsthistorikere til å delta i våre aktiviteter. Vi ser at ved å være åpne for andre enn kunstneres blikk på kunst og dets domene utvider vi diskusjonen på en måte som gagner alle parter. I tillegg til de som har bidratt med betenkninger omkring kunst i forbindelse med utstillingene, så har altså unge kunsthistorikere presentert sine prosjekter og sin forskning for et åpent publikum i serien forelesninger Masterkveld. På den måten ønsker vi også å skape møter mellom studenter og profesjonelle aktører innenfor kunstfeltet og å etablere tettere kontakt mellom det akademiske og det praktiske kunstlivet i Bergen.

I tillegg til å være en formidlingsinstitusjon er Hordaland kunstsenter altså også et fagsenter. Dette er særlig tydelig i vår deltagelse i B-open, der vi legger til rette for at åpne atelier og seminar blir avviklet. I år hadde hele programmet samme overskrift som tittelen på seminaret: Å produsere en kunstscene. Så som i fjor har vi i år også invitert inn en observatør til seminaret, og dette var litteratur- og kunstkritiker Susanne Christensen. Hennes tekst har vi også tatt med i denne katalogen.

Vi ønsker hele tiden å bidra til diskusjon og kontinuerlig å være sjenerøse med de tankene som oppstår innefor vårt rammeverk. Derfor ber vi alle gjester i vårt gjesteprogram om å holde en presentasjon av sitt eget arbeid, et tema de er interessert i eller hvilke planer de har mens de er i Bergen. Vi har blitt presentert for et bredt spekter av aktiviteter og tanker, og til og med blitt invitert med på piknik. Våre gjester i 2010 har vært: Hyunjin Kim (kurator, Sør-Korea), Margret Holz (kunstner, Tyskland), Daniela Castro (skribent og kurator, Brasil), Marco Bruzzone (kunstner, Italia/Tyskland), Bertram Haude (kunstner, Tyskland), Juan Andres Gaitán (kunsthistoriker og kurator, Canada/Nederland), Maija Rudovska (kunsthisoriker og kurator, Latvia), Cécile Belmont (kunstner, Frankrike/Tyskland), Johan Lundh (kurator, Sverige) og LeRoy Stevens (kunstner, USA).

I tillegg til å legge til rette for offentlig debatt, ønsker vi også å være et romslig sted som gir plass til ulike utforskinger. Gjennom et samarbeid med to andre institusjoner, Baltic Art Center – BAC i Visby og Fabrikken for Kunst og Design, FFKD i København, har vi opprettet et Collaborative Research Residency der en gruppe på tre samarbeidspartnere kan samles i en måned for å forske på et selvvalgt tema. Den første gruppen som ble ønsket velkommen i Bergen var Miriam Fumarola, Marti Manen og Katarina Stenkvist som satt seg fore å undersøke muligheten for ny tenkning omkring kjønn og representasjon innefor kunstinstitusjonen. Som gjest inviterte de Olav Fumarola Unsgaard. Sammen ønsker de å utforme praktiske og fungerende metoder ved å studere hvordan ulike former for diskriminerende maktstrukturer samhandler, og i desember holder de både presentasjon og workshop for et interessert publikum. På BAC var Namik Mackic, Samir M’kadmi og Camilla Shim Winge og på FFKD var Andjeas Ejiksson, Virginija Januškevi?i?t? og Valentinas Klimašauskas.

Også i år har vi hatt et vitne som har fulgt oss gjennom hele året. Kunstneren Anne Marthe Dyvi, som gikk ut fra masterprogrammet på Kunsthøgskolen i Bergen i år, har gjort seg opp en del tanker omkring hva Hordaland kunstsenter er og kan være i sin tekst Promemoria.

Avslutningsvis kan det være verdt å nevne at vi i 2011 kommer til å fortsette med utstillinger, presentasjoner og gjesteprogram, men at vi i tillegg vil fokusere på at det er Hordaland kunstsenters 35. år, og vi ønsker alle velkommen til et jubileumsprogram som manifesterer seg gjennom hele året!