Canopy, parasol, awning – or how to work together as artist and curator by Andreas Siqueland (visual artist) and Anne Szefer Karlsen (curator and director of Hordaland Art Centre)
was originally published in Billedkunst 03/09 and republished at www.kunstsenter.no.

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

What do you call something that is mounted firmly on the wall in order to provide shelter against sun and rain? This was of the first thing we asked ourselves as we arrived at the somewhat dilapidated hotel Grand Central where we would find shelter during our stay in Rotterdam where we attended the three day symposium, "The Curators" at Witte de With. We had both forgotten what this architectural feature is called, we were lost for words and struggled a long time to remember what it used to be called. Canopy, parasol, umbrella? No – perhaps a curator? Or rather: the curatorial! If it is true that the curatorial is related to the institution and is extendable in relation to it, then the parable may not be so silly. In any case, it is the curator's task to guard and protect works of art. The problem is knowing how far the facility can be stretched without overshadowing the work of art.

This year's first issue of Billedkunst discussed the curator's role and presence on the art scene in three different articles. A feature common to all the articles was an expressed distrust between artists and curators. For instance in curator Geir Haraldseth's remark that he uses works to illustrate his exhibitions, and that the artist is never free or autonomous. Moreover, he says that the "curator is a power broker and that this power is enhanced when the curator is institutionalized." This statement is countered in artist Hans Thorsen's lengthy lamentation on the position of power enjoyed by curated exhibitions. Artist and curator Åse Løvgren thinks that the sceptics are mainly found among the older guard, but that is perhaps not correct, either. All of these opinions instilled in us a scepticism about the bleak picture that was painted. And so we decided to take a trip abroad to learn more about what it really means to be a curator.

"The Curators" was made up of the cream of the world's curatorial staff, and it was easier to count those who were not there, than those who were there. The place was crammed with celebrities, and panel discussions, similar in format to those on television, were frequent, with enticing titles like: "Does the exhibition have a future?", "Is the curator by definition a political animal?" and "Radical-chic curating: Curatorial practice vs. curatorial fashion?" All these issues were formulated by the Witte de With's own curators and was a confirmation of the well-known curatorial trap where an exhibition (here: symposium) with an overall theme merely uses the works of art (here: the external curators) to illustrate the curator's point. We thought the panel discussion "Is curating always a collective activity?" would present new ideas about the relationship between artist and curator. Unfortunately, that was not to be, as it focussed exclusively on the role of the curator.

We shall therefore try to put into words what was left unspoken. In contrast to the reactionary attitudes expressed in Billedkunst 1/09, we would like to explore new attitudes to collaboration. For we cannot, as Irit Rogoff, Professor of Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths College, says, withdraw from the discussion – "We cannot extract ourselves from the thing that we talk about". Thus we submit to her idea that we are all implicated in our field, and in our own lives. In the Norwegian debate about the artist's view of the curator, the artist almost exclusively assumes the role of victim, and the curator rarely expresses his views about the artist in public. You change things by taking part. We want to be active participants and would like to describe a possible scenario where our roles blend and mix without disclaimers. This is not about resistance, but an active involvement where time and again you betray the establisment from within the system, in order to generate new forms of collaboration. During an exhibition we become part of a common "we", and are able to collect fragments from the past in order to build a new history together.

How can a common voice be created; how is it possible to be both subject and community at the same time? We believe we are closing in on a solution as we focus on the relationship between curator and art, not the relationship between curator and artist. The curator must be passionately involved, so as to understand the work as if it were his own. Thus the relationship between subject and object can be dissolved. The artist's passion for his work must be adopted, and to achieve this the curator must engage in close collaboration with the artist. This must be done through sustained cooperation and interaction, also involving others, not just the artist and the curator. Art is the object of our discussion, and this process must allow for conflict, so that the discussion can give rise to a new "we", a new communal subject.

This "we" is more than just a curator and an artist. In other words, we can no longer consider curatorial work as a dichotomy. "The collapsing of the distance between the exterior and the interior must be reproduced again and again," as Rogoff says. "We" are, in other words, at any given time sitting on a terrace – a physical space between inside and outside – where the awning above us can be operated either from inside or outside, depending on how it is mounted. In this "we", we also discover the essence of art mediation. Here the audience is not viewed as a quantifiable and passive group of people but as participants, just as the artist or the curator are participants, too.

Today, conflict has become the norm, but even when a conflict happens far away, no one can remain unmoved. We believe the art scene is neither a battle field nor a transaction, but a collective and private meeting where various interests are discussed. The rhetoric about art has been borrowed from the military field; revolution, avant garde, goals, strategy, and later the economic field; power, project, method. A new language must therefore be created across the established discourse in order to embrace the production of knowledge which curator and artist actually develop in unison, and not in opposition to each other. This means that the curatorial is creating ideology, but we must be aware of the pitfalls of utopian hunting grounds.

The curator must possess a certain authority in relation to the public and his institution in order to perform his function, while the artist must have such authority in relation to his work. However, the curator and the artist should suppress the issue of authority when dealing with each other, so as to foster such mutual respect and understanding as is necessary for innovation and renewal. Therefore, both artist and curator are tasked with using the institution to change art through the curatorial.

One of the participants at the symposium who attracted most interest was Jan Hoet, a charismatic elderly gentleman from Belgium who was remembered for having mediated a Bruce Neumann video by jumping up and down next to the work. Hoet's passion for art is a good example of curatorial involvement. He believes that artists should focus on artistic production and what they want to convey through their work, not on exhibitions. The curator's role is to place the artist within society, at least one at each factory – according to Hoet. The only purpose of art is that of puncturing hierarchies and creating new relationships within an established system. In Hoet's utopian model, the curator must be available in the institution's cafe at any given time – or on the terrace under an awning – available for discussions with the public.

The question is how much sunshine you want to be exposed to. Or how much room the curatorial should take up. After all, it is obvious that everyone on the terrace has different opinions about this. And so it is high time we examined new ways in which curators and artists can collaborate. A fundamental part of the curator's job is to participate in the implementation of an exhibition, so as to create harmony between what the curator wants to highlight and what the artist would like to achieve with his work. Artists want to organize and mediate their art in the best possible way, and as for the curator, he is dependent on the work of art in order to create significant contexts. Their concern for the curatorial unites them.

We must do battle with the idea that a curated exhibition should be a purely thematic exhibition. Works should be given a non-hierarchical co-presence, where all constituent parts work in harmony. Just like in a choir, all voices should be heard at the same time. This common voice must not be a theme, but it could be an attitude, a discussion, or an assertion. It's all about the curator moving away from having his own agenda to having a perspective. The curator cannot gain an understanding of the work by reading about it, he must also possess intuition. According to Beatrix Ruf, director and curator of the Kunsthalle Zurich, the task is one of making allowance for freedom so that things can happen. We must dare to let art work on its own, and trust a piece of art's ability to mediate itself. Irit Rogoff believes that in the curatorial we must move away from what's ethical, as ethics is bound by rules, and move towards a place where theory and practice meet and remain uncomfortable. This becomes evident as you actively participate, whether as an artist or as a curator, and reach a position where you can influence the art scene. Experience creates and shapes one's position. By participating in biennials you may try to direct your criticism at the curatorial frameworks. As a curator, you can examine the curatorial by moving from being independent to being employed by an institution. And together, you might, for example, write an article in Billedkunst. In this way you can alter your point of view, become less sceptical, and find that you are in an unexpected place. Before we proceed, we will sit down on the terrace, pull out the awning just so much and enjoy both view and insight: An exhibition is not a conclusion.

----------

Translated by Egil Fredheim

----------
----------
NORSK

----------
----------
Baldakin, parasoll, markise – eller hvordan arbeide sammen som kunstner og kurator av Andreas Siqueland (billedkunstner) og Anne Szefer Karlsen (kurator og leder av Hordaland kunstsenter) er tidligere publisert i Billedkunst 3/09

Hva heter det som er montert fast mot vegg og som skal beskytte mot sol og regn? Det var noe av det første vi spurte oss selv i det vi ankom det ganske slitte hotellet Grand Central som skulle gi oss ly den tiden vi var i Rotterdam i forbindelse med det tre dager lange symposiet «The Curators» på Witte de With. Vi hadde begge glemt ordet for den arkitektoniske finessen, språket hadde blitt stumt og vi strevde i lang tid med å huske hva det en gang het. Baldakin, parasoll, paraply? Nei – kanskje en kurator? Eller rettere sagt: det kuratoriske! Hvis det er slik at det kuratoriske er knyttet til institusjonen og bevegelig ut fra den er kanskje ikke lignelsen så dum. Uansett er det i hvert fall slik at kuratoren har til oppgave å passe på og beskytte kunstverket. Problemet er nok mest å vite hvor langt ut innretningen skal trekkes så den ikke skygger for verket.

Årets første Billedkunst drøftet kuratorens rolle og tilstedeværelse på kunstscenen i tre ulike artikler. Et gjennomgående trekk i alle artiklene var uttrykket for en mistillit mellom kunstnere og kuratorer. Eksempelvis kan vi nevne kurator Geir Haraldseths bemerkning om at han bruker verk til å illustrere sine utstillinger, og at kunstneren aldri er fri eller autonom. Videre sier han at «kuratoren er en maktfigur og makten kan blir forsterket av at kuratoren institusjonaliseres». Uttalelsen møtet motsvar i kunstner Hans Thorsens langstrakte klage over den kuraterte utstillings maktposisjon. Kunstner og kurator Åse Løvgren mener det i hovedsak er den eldre garde som er skeptiske, men det er kanskje heller ikke riktig. Alle disse meningsytringene fikk oss til selv å bli skeptiske til det sortmalte bildet som ble beskrevet. Derfor bestemte vi oss for å dra på tur for å lære mer om hva det egentlig vil si å være en kurator.

«The Curators» besto av kremen av verdens kuratorstab og det var lettere å telle de som ikke var der, enn de som var der. Celebritetsfaktoren var høy og tv-mediets paneldebattformat var brukt flittig, med lokkende titler som: «Does the exhibition have a future?», «Is the curator by definition a political animal?» og «Radical-chic curating: Curatorial practice vs. curatorial fashion?». Problemstillingene var utelukkende formulert av Witte de Withs egne kuratorer og var en bekreftelse på den velkjente kuratorfellen der en utstilling (her symposium) med ett overordnet tema bruker kunstverkene (her de eksterne kuratorene) til bare å illustrere kuratorens poeng. Vi tenkte at paneldebatten «Is curating always a collective activity?» ville presentere nye tanker om forholdet kunstner og kurator. Dessverre var ikke dette tilfelle da fokuset ensidig var rettet mot kuratorrollen.

Vi skal derfor her prøve å sette ord på det uuttalte. I motsetning til de reaksjonære holdningene i Billedkunst 1/09, ønsker vi å utforske nye holdninger til samarbeidet. For vi kan ikke, som Irit Rogoff, professor i Visual Cultures ved Goldsmiths College, sier trekke oss ut fra diskusjonen – «We cannot extract ourselves from the thing that we talk about». Dermed gir vi oss hen til hennes tanker om at vi alle er impliserte parter innen vårt felt, og i våre egne liv. I den norske debatten om kunstnerens syn på kuratoren, inntar kunstneren nesten utelukkende en offerrolle, og kuratoren uttrykker sjelden sitt syn på kunstneren offentlig. Det er gjennom deltagelse at man skaper en forskjell. Vi vil være aktive medspillere og ønsker å beskrive et mulig scenario der våre roller blandes og sammenblandes uten ansvarsfraskrivelse. Det handler ikke om å motsette seg, men om aktiv innblanding hvor man begår svik mot det etablerte gang på gang fra innsiden av systemet, for slik å generere nye samarbeidsformer. I utstillingssituasjonen inngår vi i et felles «vi», som sammen kan samle fragmenter fra fortiden for å bygge en ny historie.

Hvordan skaper man én felles stemme; hvordan er man subjekt og felleskap samtidig? Vi nærmer oss en løsning, mener vi, idet vi fokuserer på forholdet mellom kurator og kunsten, og ikke forholdet mellom kurator og kunstner. Kuratoren må gjennom lidenskap forstå verket som sitt eget. Slik bryter man ned forholdet mellom subjekt og objekt. Kunstnerens lidenskap til verket må adopteres, og for å nå denne tilstanden må man som kurator inngå i et nært samarbeid med kunstneren. Dette må skje gjennom vedvarende samarbeid og samhandling, der også andre enn kunstneren og kuratoren er involvert. Kunsten er diskusjonsobjektet, og i denne prosessen må det være rom for konflikt, slik at det gjennom diskusjonen oppstår et nytt «vi»; et nytt felles subjekt.

Dette «vi» rommer mer enn bare kurator og kunstner. Med andre ord kan man ikke lenger se det kuratoriske arbeidet som en dikotomi. «The collapsing of the distance between the exterior and the interior must be reproduced again and again». som Rogoff sier. «Vi» sitter med andre ord til enhver tid på en terrasse – et fysisk rom mellom inne og ute – der markisen over kan styres innenfra eller utenfra avhengig av hvordan den er montert. I dette «vi» finner vi også kjernen i kunstformidling. Her ser man på publikum ikke som en kvantifiserbar og passiv gruppe mennesker men som deltagere, på samme måte som kunstneren eller kuratoren også er deltagere.

I dag har konflikt blitt det normative, men selv om en konflikt befinner seg langt unna kan ingen forholde seg uberørt. Vi mener at kunstfeltet verken er et slagfelt eller en transaksjon, men et kollektivt og privat møte hvor man diskuterer ulike interesser. Retorikken som har vært brukt om kunst har blitt hentet fra det militære; revolusjon, avant garde, mål, strategi, og senere det økonomiske; effekt, prosjekt, metode. Det må derfor skapes et nytt språk på tvers av etablert diskurs for å favne den produksjon av kunnskap som kuratoren og kunstneren faktisk står sammen om og ikke i opposisjon til. Det betyr at det kuratoriske er ideologiskapende, men man må være bevisst fallgruvene på utopiens jaktmarker.

Kuratoren må ha en viss autoritet i forhold til publikum og institusjonen for å kunne utøve sitt virke, mens kunstneren må ha det i forhold til verket. Imidlertid bør kurator og kunstner fortrenge autoritetsspørsmålet seg i mellom for å kunne skape den gjensidige respekt og forståelse som er nødvendig for gjenskaping og nyskaping. Det er altså både kunstner og kurators oppgave, gjennom det kuratoriske, å bruke institusjonen til å endre kunsten.

Blant de deltagerne på symposiet som vekket mest interesse var Jan Hoet, en eldre karismatisk herremann fra Belgia som ble husket for den gang han formidlet en Bruce Neuman-video ved å hoppe opp og ned ved siden av verket. Hoets lidenskap til kunsten er et godt eksempel på hvordan en kurator kan opptre. Han mener at kunstnerens fokus bør være på kunstnerisk produksjon og hva man vil formidle gjennom verket, ikke utstillinger. Kuratorens rolle er å plassere kunstneren i samfunnet; minst én på hver fabrikk – ifølge Hoet. Kunstens eneste oppgave er å punktere hierarkier og skape nye relasjoner i et etablert system. Kuratoren i Hoets utopiske modell, skal på sin side være tilgjengelig til enhver tid i institusjonens kafé – eller på terrassen under en markise – åpen for diskusjon med publikum.

Spørsmålet er hvor mye sol vil man ha? Eller hvor stor plass dette kuratoriske skal ta. For det er tydelig at alle på terrassen har ulike oppfatninger om dette. Det er derfor på høy tid å undersøke nye måter kuratoren og kunstneren kan arbeide sammen på. En grunnleggende del av kurators arbeid er å ta del i gjennomføringen av en utstilling, for å skape en overensstemmelse mellom det kuratoren vil fremheve, det kunstnerens verk i seg selv formidler og det kunstneren ønsker å oppnå med verket. Kunstneren vil gjerne få tilrettelagt og formidlet sin kunst på best mulig måte og kuratoren er på sin side avhengig av kunsten for å skape meningsbærende sammenhenger. Om det kuratoriske står man sammen.

Man må ta et oppgjør med ideen om at en kuratert utstilling utelukkende dreier seg om en temautstilling. Verkene bør bringes inn i et ikke-hierarkisk samnærvær (co-presence), der alle bestanddeler skal ha en samklang. Lik et kor skal alle stemmer høres på en og samme gang. Denne fellesstemmen må ikke være et tema, men kan være en holdning, en diskusjon eller en påstand. Det handler om at kuratoren må bevege seg bort fra å ha en agenda til å ha et perspektiv. Kuratoren kan ikke kun lese seg til en forståelse av verket, men må også ha intuisjon. Oppgaven er i følge Beatrix Ruf, leder og kurator for Kunsthalle Zürich, å skape et rom for frihet der ting kan skje. Man må tørre å la kunsten arbeide på egenhånd, og stole på at et kunstverk også kan formidle seg selv. Irit Rogoff mener at man i det kuratoriske må bevege seg bort fra det etiske, da det etiske er bundet av regler, mot et sted der teori og praksis møtes og forblir ukomfortable. Dette blir tydelig i det man aktivt deltar som kunstner eller kurator, og man kommer i posisjon til å påvirke kunstfeltet. Erfaringer skaper og definerer ens eget ståsted. Ved å delta i biennaler kan man forsøke å rette kritikk mot de kuratoriske rammene. Som kurator kan man undersøke det kuratoriske ved å gå over fra å være uavhengig til å være ansatt ved en institusjon. Og sammen kan man for eksempel skrive en artikkel i Billedkunst. Slik kan man endre ståsted, bli mindre skeptisk og finne seg selv igjen på et uant sted. Før vi går videre setter vi oss på terrassen, trekker ut markisen akkurat passe og nyte både utsikten og innsikten: En utstilling er ikke en konklusjon.

Canopy, parasol, awning – or how to work together as artist and curator by Andreas Siqueland (visual artist) and Anne Szefer Karlsen (curator and director of Hordaland Art Centre)
was originally published in Billedkunst 03/09 and republished at www.kunstsenter.no.

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

What do you call something that is mounted firmly on the wall in order to provide shelter against sun and rain? This was of the first thing we asked ourselves as we arrived at the somewhat dilapidated hotel Grand Central where we would find shelter during our stay in Rotterdam where we attended the three day symposium, "The Curators" at Witte de With. We had both forgotten what this architectural feature is called, we were lost for words and struggled a long time to remember what it used to be called. Canopy, parasol, umbrella? No – perhaps a curator? Or rather: the curatorial! If it is true that the curatorial is related to the institution and is extendable in relation to it, then the parable may not be so silly. In any case, it is the curator's task to guard and protect works of art. The problem is knowing how far the facility can be stretched without overshadowing the work of art.

This year's first issue of Billedkunst discussed the curator's role and presence on the art scene in three different articles. A feature common to all the articles was an expressed distrust between artists and curators. For instance in curator Geir Haraldseth's remark that he uses works to illustrate his exhibitions, and that the artist is never free or autonomous. Moreover, he says that the "curator is a power broker and that this power is enhanced when the curator is institutionalized." This statement is countered in artist Hans Thorsen's lengthy lamentation on the position of power enjoyed by curated exhibitions. Artist and curator Åse Løvgren thinks that the sceptics are mainly found among the older guard, but that is perhaps not correct, either. All of these opinions instilled in us a scepticism about the bleak picture that was painted. And so we decided to take a trip abroad to learn more about what it really means to be a curator.

"The Curators" was made up of the cream of the world's curatorial staff, and it was easier to count those who were not there, than those who were there. The place was crammed with celebrities, and panel discussions, similar in format to those on television, were frequent, with enticing titles like: "Does the exhibition have a future?", "Is the curator by definition a political animal?" and "Radical-chic curating: Curatorial practice vs. curatorial fashion?" All these issues were formulated by the Witte de With's own curators and was a confirmation of the well-known curatorial trap where an exhibition (here: symposium) with an overall theme merely uses the works of art (here: the external curators) to illustrate the curator's point. We thought the panel discussion "Is curating always a collective activity?" would present new ideas about the relationship between artist and curator. Unfortunately, that was not to be, as it focussed exclusively on the role of the curator.

We shall therefore try to put into words what was left unspoken. In contrast to the reactionary attitudes expressed in Billedkunst 1/09, we would like to explore new attitudes to collaboration. For we cannot, as Irit Rogoff, Professor of Visual Cultures at Goldsmiths College, says, withdraw from the discussion – "We cannot extract ourselves from the thing that we talk about". Thus we submit to her idea that we are all implicated in our field, and in our own lives. In the Norwegian debate about the artist's view of the curator, the artist almost exclusively assumes the role of victim, and the curator rarely expresses his views about the artist in public. You change things by taking part. We want to be active participants and would like to describe a possible scenario where our roles blend and mix without disclaimers. This is not about resistance, but an active involvement where time and again you betray the establisment from within the system, in order to generate new forms of collaboration. During an exhibition we become part of a common "we", and are able to collect fragments from the past in order to build a new history together.

How can a common voice be created; how is it possible to be both subject and community at the same time? We believe we are closing in on a solution as we focus on the relationship between curator and art, not the relationship between curator and artist. The curator must be passionately involved, so as to understand the work as if it were his own. Thus the relationship between subject and object can be dissolved. The artist's passion for his work must be adopted, and to achieve this the curator must engage in close collaboration with the artist. This must be done through sustained cooperation and interaction, also involving others, not just the artist and the curator. Art is the object of our discussion, and this process must allow for conflict, so that the discussion can give rise to a new "we", a new communal subject.

This "we" is more than just a curator and an artist. In other words, we can no longer consider curatorial work as a dichotomy. "The collapsing of the distance between the exterior and the interior must be reproduced again and again," as Rogoff says. "We" are, in other words, at any given time sitting on a terrace – a physical space between inside and outside – where the awning above us can be operated either from inside or outside, depending on how it is mounted. In this "we", we also discover the essence of art mediation. Here the audience is not viewed as a quantifiable and passive group of people but as participants, just as the artist or the curator are participants, too.

Today, conflict has become the norm, but even when a conflict happens far away, no one can remain unmoved. We believe the art scene is neither a battle field nor a transaction, but a collective and private meeting where various interests are discussed. The rhetoric about art has been borrowed from the military field; revolution, avant garde, goals, strategy, and later the economic field; power, project, method. A new language must therefore be created across the established discourse in order to embrace the production of knowledge which curator and artist actually develop in unison, and not in opposition to each other. This means that the curatorial is creating ideology, but we must be aware of the pitfalls of utopian hunting grounds.

The curator must possess a certain authority in relation to the public and his institution in order to perform his function, while the artist must have such authority in relation to his work. However, the curator and the artist should suppress the issue of authority when dealing with each other, so as to foster such mutual respect and understanding as is necessary for innovation and renewal. Therefore, both artist and curator are tasked with using the institution to change art through the curatorial.

One of the participants at the symposium who attracted most interest was Jan Hoet, a charismatic elderly gentleman from Belgium who was remembered for having mediated a Bruce Neumann video by jumping up and down next to the work. Hoet's passion for art is a good example of curatorial involvement. He believes that artists should focus on artistic production and what they want to convey through their work, not on exhibitions. The curator's role is to place the artist within society, at least one at each factory – according to Hoet. The only purpose of art is that of puncturing hierarchies and creating new relationships within an established system. In Hoet's utopian model, the curator must be available in the institution's cafe at any given time – or on the terrace under an awning – available for discussions with the public.

The question is how much sunshine you want to be exposed to. Or how much room the curatorial should take up. After all, it is obvious that everyone on the terrace has different opinions about this. And so it is high time we examined new ways in which curators and artists can collaborate. A fundamental part of the curator's job is to participate in the implementation of an exhibition, so as to create harmony between what the curator wants to highlight and what the artist would like to achieve with his work. Artists want to organize and mediate their art in the best possible way, and as for the curator, he is dependent on the work of art in order to create significant contexts. Their concern for the curatorial unites them.

We must do battle with the idea that a curated exhibition should be a purely thematic exhibition. Works should be given a non-hierarchical co-presence, where all constituent parts work in harmony. Just like in a choir, all voices should be heard at the same time. This common voice must not be a theme, but it could be an attitude, a discussion, or an assertion. It's all about the curator moving away from having his own agenda to having a perspective. The curator cannot gain an understanding of the work by reading about it, he must also possess intuition. According to Beatrix Ruf, director and curator of the Kunsthalle Zurich, the task is one of making allowance for freedom so that things can happen. We must dare to let art work on its own, and trust a piece of art's ability to mediate itself. Irit Rogoff believes that in the curatorial we must move away from what's ethical, as ethics is bound by rules, and move towards a place where theory and practice meet and remain uncomfortable. This becomes evident as you actively participate, whether as an artist or as a curator, and reach a position where you can influence the art scene. Experience creates and shapes one's position. By participating in biennials you may try to direct your criticism at the curatorial frameworks. As a curator, you can examine the curatorial by moving from being independent to being employed by an institution. And together, you might, for example, write an article in Billedkunst. In this way you can alter your point of view, become less sceptical, and find that you are in an unexpected place. Before we proceed, we will sit down on the terrace, pull out the awning just so much and enjoy both view and insight: An exhibition is not a conclusion.

----------

Translated by Egil Fredheim

----------
----------
NORSK

----------
----------
Baldakin, parasoll, markise – eller hvordan arbeide sammen som kunstner og kurator av Andreas Siqueland (billedkunstner) og Anne Szefer Karlsen (kurator og leder av Hordaland kunstsenter) er tidligere publisert i Billedkunst 3/09

Hva heter det som er montert fast mot vegg og som skal beskytte mot sol og regn? Det var noe av det første vi spurte oss selv i det vi ankom det ganske slitte hotellet Grand Central som skulle gi oss ly den tiden vi var i Rotterdam i forbindelse med det tre dager lange symposiet «The Curators» på Witte de With. Vi hadde begge glemt ordet for den arkitektoniske finessen, språket hadde blitt stumt og vi strevde i lang tid med å huske hva det en gang het. Baldakin, parasoll, paraply? Nei – kanskje en kurator? Eller rettere sagt: det kuratoriske! Hvis det er slik at det kuratoriske er knyttet til institusjonen og bevegelig ut fra den er kanskje ikke lignelsen så dum. Uansett er det i hvert fall slik at kuratoren har til oppgave å passe på og beskytte kunstverket. Problemet er nok mest å vite hvor langt ut innretningen skal trekkes så den ikke skygger for verket.

Årets første Billedkunst drøftet kuratorens rolle og tilstedeværelse på kunstscenen i tre ulike artikler. Et gjennomgående trekk i alle artiklene var uttrykket for en mistillit mellom kunstnere og kuratorer. Eksempelvis kan vi nevne kurator Geir Haraldseths bemerkning om at han bruker verk til å illustrere sine utstillinger, og at kunstneren aldri er fri eller autonom. Videre sier han at «kuratoren er en maktfigur og makten kan blir forsterket av at kuratoren institusjonaliseres». Uttalelsen møtet motsvar i kunstner Hans Thorsens langstrakte klage over den kuraterte utstillings maktposisjon. Kunstner og kurator Åse Løvgren mener det i hovedsak er den eldre garde som er skeptiske, men det er kanskje heller ikke riktig. Alle disse meningsytringene fikk oss til selv å bli skeptiske til det sortmalte bildet som ble beskrevet. Derfor bestemte vi oss for å dra på tur for å lære mer om hva det egentlig vil si å være en kurator.

«The Curators» besto av kremen av verdens kuratorstab og det var lettere å telle de som ikke var der, enn de som var der. Celebritetsfaktoren var høy og tv-mediets paneldebattformat var brukt flittig, med lokkende titler som: «Does the exhibition have a future?», «Is the curator by definition a political animal?» og «Radical-chic curating: Curatorial practice vs. curatorial fashion?». Problemstillingene var utelukkende formulert av Witte de Withs egne kuratorer og var en bekreftelse på den velkjente kuratorfellen der en utstilling (her symposium) med ett overordnet tema bruker kunstverkene (her de eksterne kuratorene) til bare å illustrere kuratorens poeng. Vi tenkte at paneldebatten «Is curating always a collective activity?» ville presentere nye tanker om forholdet kunstner og kurator. Dessverre var ikke dette tilfelle da fokuset ensidig var rettet mot kuratorrollen.

Vi skal derfor her prøve å sette ord på det uuttalte. I motsetning til de reaksjonære holdningene i Billedkunst 1/09, ønsker vi å utforske nye holdninger til samarbeidet. For vi kan ikke, som Irit Rogoff, professor i Visual Cultures ved Goldsmiths College, sier trekke oss ut fra diskusjonen – «We cannot extract ourselves from the thing that we talk about». Dermed gir vi oss hen til hennes tanker om at vi alle er impliserte parter innen vårt felt, og i våre egne liv. I den norske debatten om kunstnerens syn på kuratoren, inntar kunstneren nesten utelukkende en offerrolle, og kuratoren uttrykker sjelden sitt syn på kunstneren offentlig. Det er gjennom deltagelse at man skaper en forskjell. Vi vil være aktive medspillere og ønsker å beskrive et mulig scenario der våre roller blandes og sammenblandes uten ansvarsfraskrivelse. Det handler ikke om å motsette seg, men om aktiv innblanding hvor man begår svik mot det etablerte gang på gang fra innsiden av systemet, for slik å generere nye samarbeidsformer. I utstillingssituasjonen inngår vi i et felles «vi», som sammen kan samle fragmenter fra fortiden for å bygge en ny historie.

Hvordan skaper man én felles stemme; hvordan er man subjekt og felleskap samtidig? Vi nærmer oss en løsning, mener vi, idet vi fokuserer på forholdet mellom kurator og kunsten, og ikke forholdet mellom kurator og kunstner. Kuratoren må gjennom lidenskap forstå verket som sitt eget. Slik bryter man ned forholdet mellom subjekt og objekt. Kunstnerens lidenskap til verket må adopteres, og for å nå denne tilstanden må man som kurator inngå i et nært samarbeid med kunstneren. Dette må skje gjennom vedvarende samarbeid og samhandling, der også andre enn kunstneren og kuratoren er involvert. Kunsten er diskusjonsobjektet, og i denne prosessen må det være rom for konflikt, slik at det gjennom diskusjonen oppstår et nytt «vi»; et nytt felles subjekt.

Dette «vi» rommer mer enn bare kurator og kunstner. Med andre ord kan man ikke lenger se det kuratoriske arbeidet som en dikotomi. «The collapsing of the distance between the exterior and the interior must be reproduced again and again». som Rogoff sier. «Vi» sitter med andre ord til enhver tid på en terrasse – et fysisk rom mellom inne og ute – der markisen over kan styres innenfra eller utenfra avhengig av hvordan den er montert. I dette «vi» finner vi også kjernen i kunstformidling. Her ser man på publikum ikke som en kvantifiserbar og passiv gruppe mennesker men som deltagere, på samme måte som kunstneren eller kuratoren også er deltagere.

I dag har konflikt blitt det normative, men selv om en konflikt befinner seg langt unna kan ingen forholde seg uberørt. Vi mener at kunstfeltet verken er et slagfelt eller en transaksjon, men et kollektivt og privat møte hvor man diskuterer ulike interesser. Retorikken som har vært brukt om kunst har blitt hentet fra det militære; revolusjon, avant garde, mål, strategi, og senere det økonomiske; effekt, prosjekt, metode. Det må derfor skapes et nytt språk på tvers av etablert diskurs for å favne den produksjon av kunnskap som kuratoren og kunstneren faktisk står sammen om og ikke i opposisjon til. Det betyr at det kuratoriske er ideologiskapende, men man må være bevisst fallgruvene på utopiens jaktmarker.

Kuratoren må ha en viss autoritet i forhold til publikum og institusjonen for å kunne utøve sitt virke, mens kunstneren må ha det i forhold til verket. Imidlertid bør kurator og kunstner fortrenge autoritetsspørsmålet seg i mellom for å kunne skape den gjensidige respekt og forståelse som er nødvendig for gjenskaping og nyskaping. Det er altså både kunstner og kurators oppgave, gjennom det kuratoriske, å bruke institusjonen til å endre kunsten.

Blant de deltagerne på symposiet som vekket mest interesse var Jan Hoet, en eldre karismatisk herremann fra Belgia som ble husket for den gang han formidlet en Bruce Neuman-video ved å hoppe opp og ned ved siden av verket. Hoets lidenskap til kunsten er et godt eksempel på hvordan en kurator kan opptre. Han mener at kunstnerens fokus bør være på kunstnerisk produksjon og hva man vil formidle gjennom verket, ikke utstillinger. Kuratorens rolle er å plassere kunstneren i samfunnet; minst én på hver fabrikk – ifølge Hoet. Kunstens eneste oppgave er å punktere hierarkier og skape nye relasjoner i et etablert system. Kuratoren i Hoets utopiske modell, skal på sin side være tilgjengelig til enhver tid i institusjonens kafé – eller på terrassen under en markise – åpen for diskusjon med publikum.

Spørsmålet er hvor mye sol vil man ha? Eller hvor stor plass dette kuratoriske skal ta. For det er tydelig at alle på terrassen har ulike oppfatninger om dette. Det er derfor på høy tid å undersøke nye måter kuratoren og kunstneren kan arbeide sammen på. En grunnleggende del av kurators arbeid er å ta del i gjennomføringen av en utstilling, for å skape en overensstemmelse mellom det kuratoren vil fremheve, det kunstnerens verk i seg selv formidler og det kunstneren ønsker å oppnå med verket. Kunstneren vil gjerne få tilrettelagt og formidlet sin kunst på best mulig måte og kuratoren er på sin side avhengig av kunsten for å skape meningsbærende sammenhenger. Om det kuratoriske står man sammen.

Man må ta et oppgjør med ideen om at en kuratert utstilling utelukkende dreier seg om en temautstilling. Verkene bør bringes inn i et ikke-hierarkisk samnærvær (co-presence), der alle bestanddeler skal ha en samklang. Lik et kor skal alle stemmer høres på en og samme gang. Denne fellesstemmen må ikke være et tema, men kan være en holdning, en diskusjon eller en påstand. Det handler om at kuratoren må bevege seg bort fra å ha en agenda til å ha et perspektiv. Kuratoren kan ikke kun lese seg til en forståelse av verket, men må også ha intuisjon. Oppgaven er i følge Beatrix Ruf, leder og kurator for Kunsthalle Zürich, å skape et rom for frihet der ting kan skje. Man må tørre å la kunsten arbeide på egenhånd, og stole på at et kunstverk også kan formidle seg selv. Irit Rogoff mener at man i det kuratoriske må bevege seg bort fra det etiske, da det etiske er bundet av regler, mot et sted der teori og praksis møtes og forblir ukomfortable. Dette blir tydelig i det man aktivt deltar som kunstner eller kurator, og man kommer i posisjon til å påvirke kunstfeltet. Erfaringer skaper og definerer ens eget ståsted. Ved å delta i biennaler kan man forsøke å rette kritikk mot de kuratoriske rammene. Som kurator kan man undersøke det kuratoriske ved å gå over fra å være uavhengig til å være ansatt ved en institusjon. Og sammen kan man for eksempel skrive en artikkel i Billedkunst. Slik kan man endre ståsted, bli mindre skeptisk og finne seg selv igjen på et uant sted. Før vi går videre setter vi oss på terrassen, trekker ut markisen akkurat passe og nyte både utsikten og innsikten: En utstilling er ikke en konklusjon.