Retrospective Catalogue 2011 is the collection of commissioned texts accompanying Hordaland Art Centre's exhibitions, as well as documentation of all the exhibitions with the witness report on the 2011 programme written by artist Andrea Spreafico as well as a tet by curator Valentinas Klimašauskas and writer/editor Audun Lindholm. Let's make a detour! is the introduction to the catalogue.

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

Let's make a detour!

In 2011 we have marked the 35th anniversary of Hordaland Art Centre, and we designed a program where we explored history(ies) and future(s) based on different themes and institutional frameworks.

At the start of the year we asked a number of questions we thought would be pertinent to the present: Do we need to take a closer look at the past? How can we prepare for the future? Is it possible to act as if the present were independent of both history and future? Or are history and future always present, in disguise? Could it be that the present is kept in place by history as it charges into the future? We have collaborated with many different voices from different parts of the world, and together we have produced five exhibitions as well as lectures and seminars, in addition to original texts. Thus we have continued our role as an institution where art is presented and as well as a centre of learning.

This jubilee program has deliberately steered clear of a self-mythologising approach, focussing rather on the idea of history(ies) and future(s) as the framework of the present. Nostalgia and hope, longing for what has been and longing for what is yet to come, may serve as poetic concepts with regard to this year’s program.

We have taken on the challenge of finding new ways of thought, new strategies for understanding the relationship between history and future as sketched in the introduction, in other words, how to understand the present. There is no direct route to such understanding, so we have had to make some detours. Detours may put us in contact with voices that are trained in the exploration of areas where the possibilities are endless.

However, let us make a detour before getting down to the nitty gritty of this year’s program! First, an experiment in visualisation: Try to describe the time surrounding an event in terms of an image, for instance the time surrounding a chaotic event of uncertain outcome. This time is at the centre of the event, but it passes so swiftly that it is almost impossible to take it in. At such a centre, time is brief, hurried and confusing. At this time, we must trust our reflexes and intuitions, as there is no time to analyse or reflect on the event that is taking place. It seems as if time is non-existent at the centre of an event, or to put it differently, it seems to be standing still because everything is happening so fast. We may visualise this time as a dot. We put a dot on the sheet of paper, swiftly and intuitively. The event need not be all that dramatic. Not at all. Everyday time also passes quickly. (The event may be somebody accidentally scratching a negative.)

Then let us continue by attending to time outside the centre of the event. We draw a large circle around the dot, turning the dot into the centre of the event. Time moves slowly at the periphery of the event. It takes longer to move around the centre of the event than to experience it; we have more time on our hands. Out here time lasts longer, at the periphery, it is slow and transparent, there is time to stop and analyse and reflect on the event at the centre of things, but also on our present distance to the event. (At this time we may for example find someone trying to negotiate a contract.)

History is made in the tension between these two concepts, the dot at the middle and the circular movement around it. Inside this circle we agree on what has happened. This is where we turn to eyewitnesses who describe the event. (Here we might for example find a description of how the skill of constructing a trap is passed on from one person to the next.)

Our perspective is created at the periphery of the circle. In fact, the circle is so wide that there is no way we could move all the way round the periphery, only part of it. All of the time we and the eyewitness have our eyes turned towards the centre of the circle, trying to understand the event that has taken place. Subconsciously, but in an attempt at analysis and reflection, we produce a pie chart. This triangular slice of time envelops the event and becomes our idea of the heart of the matter. (An archive, for example, is an excellent example of a physical pie chart.)

In recent decades art has taken on the role of producing juxtapositions of time within our circle. The artist trawls archives, creating asymmetrical slices of the circle, or launches actionist events that are such hastily printed dots. (We may notice this when we juxtapose different art works that appear to have been created using the same technique.)

Our challenge at the present is one of seeing beyond the model we have sketched above. Art cannot be just a matter of looking at history, refining our understanding of ourselves and the world. It can and must encompass something more, it can present us with opportunities where we can be challenged and make detours outside the circle: Art gives us a sense of the endless possibilities contained in things we are unaware of. Our sense of imagination enriches the world, making the time we inhabit endlessly available without assuming that things like economic growth or progress are the sole purpose of our existence. Let us take a closer look and see if we are capable of applying our sense of imagination. Let us start by creating a larger notion of the present.

Let us return to the model we drew on our imaginary sheet of paper. What if we don’t just direct our gaze at the centre of the circle? What if we turn round, looking outside the circle? What is out there, if not our own sense of imagination? In order to turn round we must employ intuition as well as reflection, analysis as well as reflex. On the best of days we will find art out there. We hope we have spent this last year being involved in creating a place where art has happened.

Len Lye was the first exhibition of the year. We presented six of the films he made between 1935 and 1979: A Colour Box (1935), Trade Tattoo (1937), Swinging the Lambeth Walk (1939), Rhythm (1957), Free Radicals (1958, reworked 1979) and Particles in Space (1957). For his film Tusalava (1929), whose sound track has gone missing, we commissioned three specially written sound works by Espen Sommer Eide, Lasse Marhaug and Maia Urstad for an evening program called Len LIVE! The exhibition was not retrospective in the sense of trying to present a definitive understanding of Lye as an artist; it was more of an exploration of how we can relate to his works at the present time. Lye’s point of departure was always movement, his films were made using new methods; he scratched celluloid film, painting directly onto it, so called “direct film”. This allowed him to explore ways of expression in a vivid way, one otherwise impossible through the medium of film. Lye also explored scale through his sculptures, sometimes making several versions of the same art work in different sizes. Thus he also questioned the notion of originality. In keeping with his interests we created a situation where people had to move about relative to the films in order to see the exhibition; within a limited area of the gallery the films moved between screens of different sizes and in random sequence. Exhibitions often confront us with at static display and a carefully calculated presentation. Using new technology, not available in Lye’s day, we made it possible to watch all the films in new ways.

There are several reasons why Hordaland Art Centre – as part of the 35th anniversary program – put on a solo exhibition of a deceased artist for the first time in its history. In this case the most important reason was our continued commitment to the exploration of what artists of our day are interested in and want to discuss. Lye’s works were first mentioned at Hordaland Art Centre when the artist HC Gilje talked about his work in connection with his exhibition blink, in 2009. Presenting Len Lye was an expression of our institution’s desire to take the interest one of our local artists has shown in another artist seriously, hence we invited Gilje to co-curate the exhibition.

Throughout the autumn of 2010 and the spring of 2011 we worked with the Egyptian curator Sarah Rifky, who created the exhibition The Bergen Accords, in which she took as her starting point the accord, or contract, which turned into a project in three parts. The Bergen Accords was introduced at Torgalmenningen on May Day, with the production of the living sculpture If not Us, Who? If not Now, When? by the two artists Anetta Mona Chi?a and Lucia Tká?ová. This work served as a prologue to the second part of the project, a solo exhibition at Hordaland Art Centre titled This one is for the birds, presenting new and partly site specific works by the artist Oraib Toukan. In many ways Toukan’s work came about through direct negotiations between the curator and the institution, besides purely physical negotiations with the exhibition room. Also, we supported Rifky’s wish to present a proposal suggesting that the name of Hordaland Art Centre be permanently changed, a process titled Name Change Act which was part of the art centre’s inner matter until September 1, when the board of directors considered the 26 names proposed by artists and curators, and decided to keep the present name.

Here we should mention that our colleague, Sarah, was challenged to rethink the project again and again, in view of the extraordinary situation in her home city, Cairo. Processes that began in February this year and are still going on, must have contributed to the shaping The Bergen Accords and will surely contribute to the way this project will be understood for a long time to come.

2011 was the first time in many years that Hordaland Art Centre kept an exhibition open during the summer months. We decided to exhibit a work by the artist Omer Fast, Nostalgia from 2009, which is a carefully constructed film narrative in three parts, using the eye witness as source. His work is poised between the probable and the fictional, and the nerve running through the loops, screens and projections is sympathetic, maybe even empathic. This work, which was first shown at the South London Gallery, arises from interviews with immigrants to the United Kingdom. The immigrants become narrators, and through what to European eyes may look like a post-apocalyptic society we ourselves, through a filmic change of roles, are turned into eye witnesses observing the obstacles and difficulties as “we” try to seek refuge in an Africa that is alluringly peaceful and prosperous.

The work’s proposition is simple enough, as Fast turns a situation that is very real for many on its head, he uses an old trick of the storyteller's trade to get the “truth” across. But this assertion also wove a complex web of questions that were, and continue to be, important in a North European context. Assuming that everyone, given the chance, would get up and leave, is naïve. It is also naïve to believe that all migrations are voluntarily. The tension between these two assertions creates a vast landscape of reasons, duties, hopes, dreams and forces. Regrettably, we are not able to see this landscape in the media images and broadcast debates, which is why we thought this was such an important work for us to see, discuss and experience. Our summer exhibition was unexpectedly given contemporary relevance by events outside the Art Centre, i. e. the events in Oslo and at Utøya July 22.

Following a turbulent summer, we opened a new exhibition project, one that Hordaland Art Centre and the artist Elsebeth Jørgensen have been involved with since 2008. In early 2010 we started the practical implementation of what became Ways of Losing Oneself in an Image. In close cooperation with the Picture Collection at the University of Bergen – Special Collections, in particular with senior academic librarian Solveig Greve, this exhibition achieved the merger of several elements. All the material for the work was drawn from the Picture Collection as Jørgensen created a work with more than one point of entry, just like an archive. Her works have for years circled in on various ideas in connection with the documentation of place, historicity and montages, as well as how archival processes and the construction of collective memories result in ambivalence and dilemmas related to concepts of preservation, choice, systematising and the importance of a subjective view.

Jørgensen observed this archive as a whole for a year, after which the historical records were juxtaposed with her own artistic observations in Ways of Losing Oneself in an Image. The project arises from an interest in the potential poetic narrative of the picture collection and the inaccessible part of the collection here in Bergen; the material that has not yet been registered, as well as the meta-archive of the place itself. Jørgensen’s adaptation of this material mixed fact and fiction, she reflected on how historical information may be used as hypothetical conjecture about our understanding of the future.

The last exhibition of the year was curated by Glenn Adamson, Head of Research and Graduate Studies at the Victoria and Albert Museum. In a much smaller exhibition space than he is used to this turned into an exploration in miniature of the relationship between textiles and photography. As Adamson writes in the introduction to his text accompanying the exhibition: Textiles and photography: the two mediums seem, at first, to be antithetical. On the one hand we have a painstakingly slow craft, and on the other an immediate and automatic process. One is constructive, the other indexical.

The exhibition focused on the way the Jaquard loom could unite these two techniques, showing works by the artists Chuck Close, Lia Cook, Kari Dyrdal and Johanna Friedman, who between them created a photographic landscape in the exhibition by way of different approaches to and use of the same technique. Karina Presttun continued the possibilities for a layered composition of images offered by digital photo processing, lending a spatial impression to her fabric collage, while Sabrina Gschwandtner and Kate Nartker exploited a different cross pollination of the two media through their video works; Gschwandtner, with a documentary video that might appropriately be termed a sound study which spread throughout the room, and Kate Narthker with a time-lapse video of woven stills that together made up the exhibition’s other video work.

In addition to the exhibitions of the year we have arranged our regular Master Weekends, where we have presented two different installations. In the spring Jason Dunne created the installation Potemkin Village, in which a male figure of varying sizes is repeated almost endlessly, creating a society which the viewer could not automatically gain access to, and in the autumn Gabriel Johann Kvendseth reproduced a workshop in the gallery room which was home to his installation Prototypes: ARSENAL.

Even if we have spent the whole year discussing history/histories and future/futures as a year long jubilee ceremony, we still wanted to mark the year by celebrating specificity. Therefore we invited everyone to join the seminar A slice of Anti-History in which four artists who had previously held exhibitions at Hordaland Art Centre were invited to present a talk. Torbjørn Kvasbø (solo exhibition in October 1987 and March 1993), Talleiv Taro Manum (solo exhibition in May 1998) and Eva Kun (solo exhibition in September 1988 and May 2003) lectured and held presentations, and Kurt Johannessen (several performances and solo exhibitions in September 1988 and May 2004) did a performance lecture for the occasion.

Thus this seminar was not a question of a comprehensive institutional historiography, rather a piece of anti-history [1], as we focused on the time we have been at 17 Klosteret (since 1985) through the smallest and most crucial components; a selection of specific exhibitions represented by the artists whose works were shown.

It is easy to feel caught unawares and bulldozed when faced with the history of an institution. Thematising such a history is a demanding task and presents a number of challenges. Especially as the institution and its life must be sustained at the same time as one turns around to look at history. We had to make a few dramatic choices during the preparations for this seminar that we think has made it a poetic as well as a constructive contribution in view of what an art centre can be. By choosing to focus on the time when Hordaland Art Centre has existed at Klosteret, much of what was said that day could almost be “physically tested”. We could say that THIS happened HERE. Besides, our frame of reference allowed us to concentrate solely on art that had been exhibited.

You may say that celebrating an institution’s 35th anniversary is a bit odd. It is. We took this opportunity as we think Norwegian art centres are underappreciated structures of art mediation, and their role as art institutions that are common to both the public and the art professionals, is very seldom celebrated. We wanted to change that, and I hope we have succeeded.

------
[1] In his introduction to the book The Beauty And The Sorrow of Combat, historian and author Peter Englund reflects on his work: more than 600 pages written based on the personal notes and diaries of nineteen people of different ages and of different nationalities and backgrounds who lived through World War I. Towards the end of the introduction he writes: “Most of these nineteen people will take part in dramatic, terrible events, but even so, our focus will be on everyday life during the war. In one sense, this is a piece of anti-history, in that I have tried to retrace this in every sense of the word epochal event to its minutest part, the individual person and his or her experiences.”

Translated from the Norwegian by Egil Fredheim.

--------
--------

La oss ta en omvei!

I 2011 har vi markert at Hordaland kunstsenter er 35 år, og vi har skapt et program som har utforsket historie(r) og framtid(er) med utgangspunkt i ulike temaer og institusjonelle rammeverk.
Vi startet året med å stille en rekke spørsmål vi mente var passende å stille i samtiden: Trenger vi å se nærmere på fortiden? Hvordan forbereder vi oss på framtiden? Er det mulig å agere som om samtiden er uavhengig av både historie og framtid? Eller ligger historie og framtid alltid på lur? Kanskje er samtiden holdt fast av historie, samtidig som den jager mot framtid? Gjennom fem utstillinger, forelesninger og seminar, i tillegg til nyproduserte tekster har vi samarbeidet med mange og ulike stemmer fra flere deler av verden, og dermed fortsatt å innta den dobbeltrollen det er å være en formidlingsinstitusjon og et fagsenter på samme tid.

Dette jubileumsprogrammet har med vilje unngått en selvmytologiserende innfallsvinkel, men heller fokusert på ideen om historie(r) og framtid(er) som samtidens rammeverk. Nostalgi og håp, å lengte etter det som har vært og lengte etter det som kommer, kan fungere som poetiske forestillinger i forhold til årets program.

Utfordringen har vært å finne ut hvordan vi kan lære oss å tenke nytt og finne nye metoder for å forstå forholdet mellom historie og framtid som er skissert i innledningen, med andre ord: hvordan forstå vår samtid. Det finnes ingen direkte vei til dette, så vi har måtte ty til omveier. Via omveier kan vi finne fram til stemmer som er trent i å utforske områder der mulighetene er uendelige.

Men før vi kommer fram til detaljene omkring årets program; la oss ta en omvei! Vi begynner med et eksperiment i visualisering: Prøv å beskrive tiden som omslutter en hendelse som et bilde, for eksempel den tiden som omslutter en kaotisk hendelse der utfallet er uvisst. Denne tiden befinner seg i hendelsens sentrum, men går så fort at den nesten er umulig å ta inn over seg. Tiden i et slik sentrum er kort, hurtig og forvirrende. Det er i denne tiden vi må stole på reflekser og intuisjoner, fordi det ikke er tid til å analysere eller reflektere over hendelsen som finner sted. Det er som om tiden ikke eksisterer i sentrum av en hendelse, eller sagt på en annen måte; det er som om den står stille fordi alt går for fort. Vi kan visualisere denne tiden som en prikk. Raskt og intuitivt setter vi en prikk på arket. Hendelsen trenger aldeles ikke være så dramatisk. Hverdagens tid går også fort. (For eksempel kan hendelsen være at noen kom til å ripe opp et negativ.)

La oss deretter fortsette med å se på tiden som ligger utenfor hendelsens sentrum. Vi tegner en stor sirkel omkring prikken, og dermed blir prikken hendelsens sentrum. I ytterkant av sirkelen går tiden sakte. Det tar lenger tid å bevege seg rundt hendelsens senter enn å erfare den; vi har bedre tid. Tiden her ute i kanten varer lenger, er langsom og oversiktlig, og vi får tid til å stoppe opp og analysere og reflektere over både hendelsen i sentrum, men også den avstanden vi nå har til hendelsen. (I denne tiden finner vi for eksempel at noen prøver å forhandle fram en kontrakt.)

Det er i spennet mellom disse to størrelsene, prikken i midten og sirkelbevegselen rundt den, at historien oppstår. Det er innenfor denne sirkelen vi blir enige med hverandre om hva som har hendt. Det er i dette landskapet vi vender oss mot øyenvitnet som beskriver hendelsen. (Her vil vi for eksempel kunne finne en beskrivelse av hvordan kunnskapen om å bygge en felle overleveres fra en person til en annen.)

I ytterkanten av sirkelen skapes vårt perspektiv. Sirkelen er nemlig så stor at vi ikke klarer å bevege oss rundt hele, men bare langs en del av omkretsen. Hele tiden har vi sammen med øyenvitnet blikket rettet mot sentrum av sirkelen for å forstå hendelsen som har funnet sted. Ubevisst, men i et forsøk på å analysere og reflektere, skaper vi et kakediagram. Dette triangellignende utsnittet av tiden omslutter hendelsen og blir til vår oppfatning av sakens kjerne. (Et arkiv er for eksempel et ypperlig eksempel på hvordan man skaper fysiske kakediagram.)

Kunsten har de siste tiårene påtatt seg rollen å lage ulike sammenstillinger av tiden som befinner seg innenfor sirkelen vår. Kunstneren foretar dypdykk ned i arkiver og skaper usymmetriske utsnitt av sirkelen, eller setter i gang aksjonistiske hendelser som er slike raskt nedtegnede prikker. (Dette kan vi se ved for eksempel å sammenstille flere kunstverk som er laget med tilsynelatende samme teknikk.)

Utfordringen vår nå er å se ut over den modellen som her er skissert opp. Kunsten kan ikke bare se tilbake på historien, og dermed nyansere vår forståelse av oss selv og av verden. Den kan og må romme noe mer, den kan gi oss muligheter til å bli utfordret og ta omveier som ligger utenfor sirkelen: Kunsten gir oss en opplevelse av at mulighetene er uendelige i det vi ikke kjenner. Forestillingsevnen beriker verden og gjør tiden vi lever i uendelig tilgjengelig uten å anta at størrelser som økonomisk vekst eller framskritt er våre eneste mål. La oss se nærmere på om vi er i stand til å benytte oss av vår forestillingsevne. La oss begynne med å skape en større forestilling av vår samtid.

Om vi går tilbake til modellen vi tegnet opp på vårt imaginære ark tidligere: Hva om vi ikke bare retter blikket mot midten av sirkelen. Hva om vi snur oss og ser ut av sirkelen? Hva finnes der ute, om ikke vår egen forestillingsevne. For å snu oss må vi benytte oss av er både intuisjon og refleksjon, både analyse og refleks. På en god dag finner vi kunsten der ute. Og det siste året håper vi at vi har vært med på å skape et sted hvor akkurat kunsten har funnet sted.

Len Lye var årets første utstilling. Her viste vi seks av hans filmer skapt mellom 1935 og 1979: A Colour Box (1935), Trade Tattoo (1937), Swinging the Lambeth Walk (1939), Rhythm (1957), Free Radicals (1958, omarbeidet 1979) og Particles in Space (1957). I tillegg bestilte vi tre spesialskrevne lydarbeider fra Espen Sommer Eide, Lasse Marhaug og Maia Urstad til hans film Tusalava (1929), en film hvis lydspor er forsvunnet, til et kveldsprogram vi kalte Len LIVE! Utstillingen var ikke en retrospektiv utstilling i den forstand at vi prøvde å gi en definitiv forståelse av Lyes kunstnerskap, men heller en undersøkelse av hvordan vi kan forholde oss til hans arbeider i dag. Lyes utgangspunkt var hele tiden bevegelse, og hans filmer ble skapt med nye metoder; han skrapte opp og malte direkte på celluloidfilm, såkalt ”direkte film”. På den måten kunne han utforske uttrykk på en ekspressiv måte som ellers ikke ville være mulig innen filmmediet. Lye undersøkte også skala i sine skulpturer, og noen ganger laget han flere versjoner av samme verk i ulik størrelse. Dermed trakk han også ideen om originalitet i tvil. I tråd med hans interesser skapte vi en situasjon hvor publikum måtte bevege seg i forhold til filmene for å se utstillingen, og innenfor et avgrenset område i galleriet flyttet filmene seg mellom skjermer i ulike størrelser i en tilfeldig rekkefølge. Ofte blir vi i utstillinger konfrontert med et statisk oppsett og en kalkulert presentasjon. Gjennom ny teknologi som ikke var tilgjengelig for Lye i hans livstid, skapte vi en mulighet til å se alle filmene på ulike måter.

Det er flere grunner til at Hordaland kunstsenter, som en del av programmet for vår 35-årsmarkering, for første gang viste en separatutstilling av en avdød kunstner. Den viktigste grunnen var i dette tilfellet vårt fortsatte engasjement for å undersøke hva kunstnere i dag interesserer seg for og vil diskutere. Lyes arbeider ble første gang omtalt på Hordaland kunstsenter da kunstner HC Gilje holdt en selvpresentasjon i forbindelse med sin egen utstilling, blink, hos oss i 2009. Med Len Lye er vår institusjonelle vilje å ta en av Bergens kunstneres interesse for en annen kunstners arbeid på alvor, og vi inviterte Gilje til å kuratere utstillingen sammen med oss.

Gjennom høsten 2010 og våren 2011 samarbeidet vi med den egyptiske kuratoren Sarah Rifky, og hun skapte utstillingsprosjektet The Bergen Accords der hun tok utgangspunkt i avtalen, eller kontrakten, som ble et tredelt prosjekt. The Bergen Accords begynte 1. mai på Torgalmenningen med oppsetningen av den levende skulpturen If not Us, Who? If not Now, When? av kunstnerduoen Anetta Mona Chi?a og Lucia Tká?ová. Dette verket fungerte som en prolog til den neste delen av prosjektet, en separatutstilling på Hordaland kunstsenter med nye og til dels stedsspesifikke arbeider av kunstneren Oraib Toukan som fikk tittelen This one is for the birds. Toukans arbeider ble på mange måter til gjennom direkte forhandlinger med kurator og institusjon, i tillegg til rent fysiske forhandlinger med utstillingsrommet. I tillegg til dette støttet vi Rifky i det at hun ønsket å føre fram et forslag om permanent å endre Hordaland kunstsenters navn, en prosess som fikk tittelen Name Change Act og som var en del av kunstsenterets indre anliggende fram til 1. september da styret på bakgrunn av innkomne forslag fra 26 kunstnere og kuratorer vedtok at vi skulle beholde vårt navn.

Det bør nevnes i denne sammenhengen av vår kollega Sarah i tiden opp mot utstillingen ble utfordret til å tenke prosjektet på nytt og på nytt, takket være den ekstraordinære situasjonen som oppsto i hennes hjemby, Kairo. Prosesser som startet i februar i år, og som fortsatt pågår, har nok vært med på å forme The Bergen Accords og vil nok være med på å forme måten vi ser på akkurat dette prosjektet i lang tid.

I 2011 var det første gang på mange år at Hordaland kunstsenter hadde en utstilling åpen over sommeren. Vi valgte å vise et verk av kunstneren Omer Fast, Nostalgia fra 2009, som er et tredelt omhyggelig oppbygget filmnarrativ der han bruker øyenvitnet som kilde. Hans arbeid balanserer mellom det sannsynlige og fiktive, og nerven gjennom loopene, skjermene og projeksjonene er sympatisk, muligens til og med empatisk. Verket ble vist første gang på South London Gallery, og springer ut av intervjuer med immigranter i Storbritannia. Immigrantene blir fortellere, og gjennom det som i europeiske øyne ser ut til å være et postapokalyptisk samfunn blir vi gjennom et filmatisk rollebytte selv gjort til øyenvitner av immigrantens hindre og vanskeligheter i det ”vi” prøver å søke tilflukt i det lokkende fredelige og velstående Afrika.

Påstanden i verket er enkel nok i dét det setter en virkelig situasjon for mange på hodet, dermed benytter Fast et gammelt fortellertriks for å la ”sannheten” skinne gjennom. Men denne påstanden vevde også et sammensatt nett av spørsmål som var og fortsatt er viktige å stille i den nordeuropeiske sammenhengen. Det er naivt å tro at alle ville, hadde de hatt sjansen, bryte opp og migrere. Samtidig er det naivt å tro at all migrasjon er frivillig. I spenningen mellom disse to påstandene er et vidstrakt felt fylt av begrunnelser, forpliktelser, håp, drømmer og krefter. Dessverre forsvinner dette feltet i mediebildene og debattene, noe som gjør at vi mente at akkurat dette verket var viktig å se, diskutere og oppleve. Uventet ble også vår sommerutstilling aktualisert av hendelser utenfor kunstsenteret med hendelsene den 22. Juli i Oslo og på Utøya.

Etter en turbulent sommer, åpnet vi et nytt utstillingsprosjekt som Hordaland kunstsenter og kunstneren Elsebeth Jørgensen har arbeidet med siden 2008. I begynnelsen av 2010 startet vi den praktiske gjennomføringen av det som ble til Ways of Losing Oneself in an Image. I godt samarbeid med Billedsamlingen ved Universitetet i Bergen – Avdeling for spesialsamlinger, og spesielt deres førstebibliotekar Solveig Greve, fikk denne utstillingen flere elementer til å gå opp i en høyere enhet. Alt materialet til verket ble hentet fra Billedsamlingen, og likt et arkiv skapte Jørgensen et verk med flere enn en inngang. Hennes arbeider har i flere år sirklet omkring ulike ideer om stedsdokumentasjon, historisitet og montasjefortelling, samt hvordan arkivariske prosesser og konstruksjonen av kollektiv hukommelse fører til ambivalens og dilemmaer knyttet til ideer om bevaring, utvelging, systematisering og betydningen av det subjektive blikket.

Jørgensen iakttok dette arkivet som helhet i et år, og i Ways of Losing Oneself in an Image ble de historiske dokumentene sammenstilt med hennes egne kunstneriske registreringer. Prosjektet springer ut av en interesse for bildearkivets poetiske narrative potensial og den utilgjengelige delen av samlingen her i Bergen; det enda ikke registrerte materialet, i tillegg til stedets eget meta-arkivmateriale. I Jørgensens bearbeiding av dette materialet ble fakta blandet med fiksjon, og hun reflekterte over hvordan historisk informasjon kan brukes som en hypotetisk fundering over vår forestilling om framtiden.

Årets siste utstilling ble kuratert av Glenn Adamson, som er leder av forskningsavdelingen og av masterstudiet ved Victoria & Albert Museum i London. I møte med et mye mindre utstillingsrom enn han vanligvis er vant til ble dette en utforsking i miniatyr av forholdet mellom tekstil og fotografi. Som Adamson skriver i innledningen i sin tekst som følger utstillingen: Tekstiler og fotografi: de to mediene later i første omgang til å være uforenlige. På den ene siden har man et møysommelig langsomt håndverk, og på den annen en umiddelbar og automatisk prosess. Den ene er skapende, den andre registrerende.

Utstillingen fokuserte på muligheten som finnes i Jaquardveven til å forene disse to teknikkene, og viste vevarbeider av kunstnerne Chuck Close, Lia Cook, Kari Dyrdal og Johanna Friedman som sammen skapte et fotografisk landskap i utstillingen gjennom ulike tilnærminger til og bruk av samme teknikk. Karina Presttun videreførte de mulighetene som finnes for lagvis oppbygging av bilder i digital fotobehandling til et romlig uttrykk i sitt stoffcollage, og Sabrina Gschwandtner og Kate Nartker benyttet en annen krysspollinering av de to mediene gjennom sine videoarbeider: Gschwandtner gjennom en dokumentarisk video som mest kan betegnes som et lydstudie som spredte seg gjennom rommet og Kate Nartker gjennom en time-lapse video av vevde stillbilder som sammen ble til utstillingens andre videoarbeid.

I tillegg til årets utstillinger har vi arrangert våre sedvanlige Masterhelger, der vi i år har vist to ulike installasjoner. På våren laget Jason Dunne installasjonen Potemkin Village der en mannsfigur i ulike størrelser repeteres nesten i det uendelige og skaper et samfunn betrakteren ikke automatisk kunne få innpass i, og på høsten gjenskapte Gabriel Johann Kvendseth et arbeidsrom i gallerirommet som huset hans installasjon Prototyper: ARSENAL.

Selv om vi har benyttet hele året til å føre en diskusjon om histori(er) og framtid(er) som en ett år lang jubileumsmarkering, ønsket vi allikevel å markere året med en feiring av det spesifikke. I oktober inviterte vi dermed til seminaret Et lite stykke anti-historie der vi inviterte fire kunstnere som tidligere har hatt utstillinger på Hordaland kunstsenter til å snakke. Torbjørn Kvasbø (separatutstillinger i oktober 1987 og mars 1993), Talleiv Taro Manum (separatutstilling i mai 1998) og Eva Kun (separatutstillinger i september 1988 og mai 2003) holdt forelesninger og presentasjoner og Kurt Johannessen (flere performancer og separatutstillinger i september 1988 og mai 2004) holdt et performanceforedrag spesielt for anledningen.

Dette seminaret var altså ikke snakk om en omfattende institusjonell historieskriving, men heller et stykke anti-historie [1], i det at vi beskrev den tiden vi har holdt til på Klosteret 17 (siden 1985) gjennom de minste, og mest avgjørende, bestanddelene: et utvalg konkrete utstillinger representert gjennom kunstnerne hvis verk ble vist.

Når man står ovenfor en institusjons historie, så kan man få følelsen av å være både overrumplet og overkjørt. Det å ville tematisere en slik historie stiller krav, og byr på en del utfordringer. Spesielt siden institusjonen og dens hverdag jo skal opprettholdes i samme åndedrag som man snur seg tilbake og ser på historien. Vi ble tvunget til å ta en del drastiske valg i forberedelsene av dette seminaret, som vi mener har gjort dette til både et poetisk og et konstruktivt innlegg i forhold til hva et kunstsenter kan være. Ved å velge å fokusere på den tiden Hordaland kunstsenter har eksistert på Klosteret ble mye av det som ble sagt denne dagen ikke bare abstrakte minnebilder, men nærmest mulig å ”fysisk etterprøve”. Vi var i stand til å si at det var DETTE som skjedde HER. I tillegg førte våre rammer til at vi utelukkende å fokusere på kunsten som var blitt vist.

Nå kan det sies at det å feire at en institusjon er 35 år er et merkelig jubileum å markere. Og det er det. Grunnen til at vi har benyttet denne anledningen er at kunstsentrene i Norge er formidlingsstrukturer vi mener ikke verdsettes nok, og deres rolle som både publikums og fagfelts felles kunstinstitusjoner feires veldig sjelden. Det ville vi gjøre noe med, og håper at vi har lykkes.

--------
[1] I introduksjonen til boken Stridens skjønnhet og sorg reflekterer historiker og forfatter Peter Englund over det arbeidet han har gjort: over 600 sider bok basert på personlige notater og dagbøker fra nitten mennesker i ulik alder og med ulik nasjonalitet og tilhørighet, som levde gjennom første verdenskrig. I slutten av introduksjonen skriver han: ”De flesta av dessa nitton kommer att vara med om både dramatiska och förfärliga ting, men fokus ligger trots detta på krigets vardag. I en mening är detta ett stycke anti-historia, i det at jag har sökt att återföra denna på alla vis epokgörande händelse till dess minsta, atomära beståndsdel, nämligen den enskilda människan och hennes upplevelse.”

Retrospective Catalogue 2011 is the collection of commissioned texts accompanying Hordaland Art Centre's exhibitions, as well as documentation of all the exhibitions with the witness report on the 2011 programme written by artist Andrea Spreafico as well as a tet by curator Valentinas Klimašauskas and writer/editor Audun Lindholm. Let's make a detour! is the introduction to the catalogue.

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

Let's make a detour!

In 2011 we have marked the 35th anniversary of Hordaland Art Centre, and we designed a program where we explored history(ies) and future(s) based on different themes and institutional frameworks.

At the start of the year we asked a number of questions we thought would be pertinent to the present: Do we need to take a closer look at the past? How can we prepare for the future? Is it possible to act as if the present were independent of both history and future? Or are history and future always present, in disguise? Could it be that the present is kept in place by history as it charges into the future? We have collaborated with many different voices from different parts of the world, and together we have produced five exhibitions as well as lectures and seminars, in addition to original texts. Thus we have continued our role as an institution where art is presented and as well as a centre of learning.

This jubilee program has deliberately steered clear of a self-mythologising approach, focussing rather on the idea of history(ies) and future(s) as the framework of the present. Nostalgia and hope, longing for what has been and longing for what is yet to come, may serve as poetic concepts with regard to this year’s program.

We have taken on the challenge of finding new ways of thought, new strategies for understanding the relationship between history and future as sketched in the introduction, in other words, how to understand the present. There is no direct route to such understanding, so we have had to make some detours. Detours may put us in contact with voices that are trained in the exploration of areas where the possibilities are endless.

However, let us make a detour before getting down to the nitty gritty of this year’s program! First, an experiment in visualisation: Try to describe the time surrounding an event in terms of an image, for instance the time surrounding a chaotic event of uncertain outcome. This time is at the centre of the event, but it passes so swiftly that it is almost impossible to take it in. At such a centre, time is brief, hurried and confusing. At this time, we must trust our reflexes and intuitions, as there is no time to analyse or reflect on the event that is taking place. It seems as if time is non-existent at the centre of an event, or to put it differently, it seems to be standing still because everything is happening so fast. We may visualise this time as a dot. We put a dot on the sheet of paper, swiftly and intuitively. The event need not be all that dramatic. Not at all. Everyday time also passes quickly. (The event may be somebody accidentally scratching a negative.)

Then let us continue by attending to time outside the centre of the event. We draw a large circle around the dot, turning the dot into the centre of the event. Time moves slowly at the periphery of the event. It takes longer to move around the centre of the event than to experience it; we have more time on our hands. Out here time lasts longer, at the periphery, it is slow and transparent, there is time to stop and analyse and reflect on the event at the centre of things, but also on our present distance to the event. (At this time we may for example find someone trying to negotiate a contract.)

History is made in the tension between these two concepts, the dot at the middle and the circular movement around it. Inside this circle we agree on what has happened. This is where we turn to eyewitnesses who describe the event. (Here we might for example find a description of how the skill of constructing a trap is passed on from one person to the next.)

Our perspective is created at the periphery of the circle. In fact, the circle is so wide that there is no way we could move all the way round the periphery, only part of it. All of the time we and the eyewitness have our eyes turned towards the centre of the circle, trying to understand the event that has taken place. Subconsciously, but in an attempt at analysis and reflection, we produce a pie chart. This triangular slice of time envelops the event and becomes our idea of the heart of the matter. (An archive, for example, is an excellent example of a physical pie chart.)

In recent decades art has taken on the role of producing juxtapositions of time within our circle. The artist trawls archives, creating asymmetrical slices of the circle, or launches actionist events that are such hastily printed dots. (We may notice this when we juxtapose different art works that appear to have been created using the same technique.)

Our challenge at the present is one of seeing beyond the model we have sketched above. Art cannot be just a matter of looking at history, refining our understanding of ourselves and the world. It can and must encompass something more, it can present us with opportunities where we can be challenged and make detours outside the circle: Art gives us a sense of the endless possibilities contained in things we are unaware of. Our sense of imagination enriches the world, making the time we inhabit endlessly available without assuming that things like economic growth or progress are the sole purpose of our existence. Let us take a closer look and see if we are capable of applying our sense of imagination. Let us start by creating a larger notion of the present.

Let us return to the model we drew on our imaginary sheet of paper. What if we don’t just direct our gaze at the centre of the circle? What if we turn round, looking outside the circle? What is out there, if not our own sense of imagination? In order to turn round we must employ intuition as well as reflection, analysis as well as reflex. On the best of days we will find art out there. We hope we have spent this last year being involved in creating a place where art has happened.

Len Lye was the first exhibition of the year. We presented six of the films he made between 1935 and 1979: A Colour Box (1935), Trade Tattoo (1937), Swinging the Lambeth Walk (1939), Rhythm (1957), Free Radicals (1958, reworked 1979) and Particles in Space (1957). For his film Tusalava (1929), whose sound track has gone missing, we commissioned three specially written sound works by Espen Sommer Eide, Lasse Marhaug and Maia Urstad for an evening program called Len LIVE! The exhibition was not retrospective in the sense of trying to present a definitive understanding of Lye as an artist; it was more of an exploration of how we can relate to his works at the present time. Lye’s point of departure was always movement, his films were made using new methods; he scratched celluloid film, painting directly onto it, so called “direct film”. This allowed him to explore ways of expression in a vivid way, one otherwise impossible through the medium of film. Lye also explored scale through his sculptures, sometimes making several versions of the same art work in different sizes. Thus he also questioned the notion of originality. In keeping with his interests we created a situation where people had to move about relative to the films in order to see the exhibition; within a limited area of the gallery the films moved between screens of different sizes and in random sequence. Exhibitions often confront us with at static display and a carefully calculated presentation. Using new technology, not available in Lye’s day, we made it possible to watch all the films in new ways.

There are several reasons why Hordaland Art Centre – as part of the 35th anniversary program – put on a solo exhibition of a deceased artist for the first time in its history. In this case the most important reason was our continued commitment to the exploration of what artists of our day are interested in and want to discuss. Lye’s works were first mentioned at Hordaland Art Centre when the artist HC Gilje talked about his work in connection with his exhibition blink, in 2009. Presenting Len Lye was an expression of our institution’s desire to take the interest one of our local artists has shown in another artist seriously, hence we invited Gilje to co-curate the exhibition.

Throughout the autumn of 2010 and the spring of 2011 we worked with the Egyptian curator Sarah Rifky, who created the exhibition The Bergen Accords, in which she took as her starting point the accord, or contract, which turned into a project in three parts. The Bergen Accords was introduced at Torgalmenningen on May Day, with the production of the living sculpture If not Us, Who? If not Now, When? by the two artists Anetta Mona Chi?a and Lucia Tká?ová. This work served as a prologue to the second part of the project, a solo exhibition at Hordaland Art Centre titled This one is for the birds, presenting new and partly site specific works by the artist Oraib Toukan. In many ways Toukan’s work came about through direct negotiations between the curator and the institution, besides purely physical negotiations with the exhibition room. Also, we supported Rifky’s wish to present a proposal suggesting that the name of Hordaland Art Centre be permanently changed, a process titled Name Change Act which was part of the art centre’s inner matter until September 1, when the board of directors considered the 26 names proposed by artists and curators, and decided to keep the present name.

Here we should mention that our colleague, Sarah, was challenged to rethink the project again and again, in view of the extraordinary situation in her home city, Cairo. Processes that began in February this year and are still going on, must have contributed to the shaping The Bergen Accords and will surely contribute to the way this project will be understood for a long time to come.

2011 was the first time in many years that Hordaland Art Centre kept an exhibition open during the summer months. We decided to exhibit a work by the artist Omer Fast, Nostalgia from 2009, which is a carefully constructed film narrative in three parts, using the eye witness as source. His work is poised between the probable and the fictional, and the nerve running through the loops, screens and projections is sympathetic, maybe even empathic. This work, which was first shown at the South London Gallery, arises from interviews with immigrants to the United Kingdom. The immigrants become narrators, and through what to European eyes may look like a post-apocalyptic society we ourselves, through a filmic change of roles, are turned into eye witnesses observing the obstacles and difficulties as “we” try to seek refuge in an Africa that is alluringly peaceful and prosperous.

The work’s proposition is simple enough, as Fast turns a situation that is very real for many on its head, he uses an old trick of the storyteller's trade to get the “truth” across. But this assertion also wove a complex web of questions that were, and continue to be, important in a North European context. Assuming that everyone, given the chance, would get up and leave, is naïve. It is also naïve to believe that all migrations are voluntarily. The tension between these two assertions creates a vast landscape of reasons, duties, hopes, dreams and forces. Regrettably, we are not able to see this landscape in the media images and broadcast debates, which is why we thought this was such an important work for us to see, discuss and experience. Our summer exhibition was unexpectedly given contemporary relevance by events outside the Art Centre, i. e. the events in Oslo and at Utøya July 22.

Following a turbulent summer, we opened a new exhibition project, one that Hordaland Art Centre and the artist Elsebeth Jørgensen have been involved with since 2008. In early 2010 we started the practical implementation of what became Ways of Losing Oneself in an Image. In close cooperation with the Picture Collection at the University of Bergen – Special Collections, in particular with senior academic librarian Solveig Greve, this exhibition achieved the merger of several elements. All the material for the work was drawn from the Picture Collection as Jørgensen created a work with more than one point of entry, just like an archive. Her works have for years circled in on various ideas in connection with the documentation of place, historicity and montages, as well as how archival processes and the construction of collective memories result in ambivalence and dilemmas related to concepts of preservation, choice, systematising and the importance of a subjective view.

Jørgensen observed this archive as a whole for a year, after which the historical records were juxtaposed with her own artistic observations in Ways of Losing Oneself in an Image. The project arises from an interest in the potential poetic narrative of the picture collection and the inaccessible part of the collection here in Bergen; the material that has not yet been registered, as well as the meta-archive of the place itself. Jørgensen’s adaptation of this material mixed fact and fiction, she reflected on how historical information may be used as hypothetical conjecture about our understanding of the future.

The last exhibition of the year was curated by Glenn Adamson, Head of Research and Graduate Studies at the Victoria and Albert Museum. In a much smaller exhibition space than he is used to this turned into an exploration in miniature of the relationship between textiles and photography. As Adamson writes in the introduction to his text accompanying the exhibition: Textiles and photography: the two mediums seem, at first, to be antithetical. On the one hand we have a painstakingly slow craft, and on the other an immediate and automatic process. One is constructive, the other indexical.

The exhibition focused on the way the Jaquard loom could unite these two techniques, showing works by the artists Chuck Close, Lia Cook, Kari Dyrdal and Johanna Friedman, who between them created a photographic landscape in the exhibition by way of different approaches to and use of the same technique. Karina Presttun continued the possibilities for a layered composition of images offered by digital photo processing, lending a spatial impression to her fabric collage, while Sabrina Gschwandtner and Kate Nartker exploited a different cross pollination of the two media through their video works; Gschwandtner, with a documentary video that might appropriately be termed a sound study which spread throughout the room, and Kate Narthker with a time-lapse video of woven stills that together made up the exhibition’s other video work.

In addition to the exhibitions of the year we have arranged our regular Master Weekends, where we have presented two different installations. In the spring Jason Dunne created the installation Potemkin Village, in which a male figure of varying sizes is repeated almost endlessly, creating a society which the viewer could not automatically gain access to, and in the autumn Gabriel Johann Kvendseth reproduced a workshop in the gallery room which was home to his installation Prototypes: ARSENAL.

Even if we have spent the whole year discussing history/histories and future/futures as a year long jubilee ceremony, we still wanted to mark the year by celebrating specificity. Therefore we invited everyone to join the seminar A slice of Anti-History in which four artists who had previously held exhibitions at Hordaland Art Centre were invited to present a talk. Torbjørn Kvasbø (solo exhibition in October 1987 and March 1993), Talleiv Taro Manum (solo exhibition in May 1998) and Eva Kun (solo exhibition in September 1988 and May 2003) lectured and held presentations, and Kurt Johannessen (several performances and solo exhibitions in September 1988 and May 2004) did a performance lecture for the occasion.

Thus this seminar was not a question of a comprehensive institutional historiography, rather a piece of anti-history [1], as we focused on the time we have been at 17 Klosteret (since 1985) through the smallest and most crucial components; a selection of specific exhibitions represented by the artists whose works were shown.

It is easy to feel caught unawares and bulldozed when faced with the history of an institution. Thematising such a history is a demanding task and presents a number of challenges. Especially as the institution and its life must be sustained at the same time as one turns around to look at history. We had to make a few dramatic choices during the preparations for this seminar that we think has made it a poetic as well as a constructive contribution in view of what an art centre can be. By choosing to focus on the time when Hordaland Art Centre has existed at Klosteret, much of what was said that day could almost be “physically tested”. We could say that THIS happened HERE. Besides, our frame of reference allowed us to concentrate solely on art that had been exhibited.

You may say that celebrating an institution’s 35th anniversary is a bit odd. It is. We took this opportunity as we think Norwegian art centres are underappreciated structures of art mediation, and their role as art institutions that are common to both the public and the art professionals, is very seldom celebrated. We wanted to change that, and I hope we have succeeded.

------
[1] In his introduction to the book The Beauty And The Sorrow of Combat, historian and author Peter Englund reflects on his work: more than 600 pages written based on the personal notes and diaries of nineteen people of different ages and of different nationalities and backgrounds who lived through World War I. Towards the end of the introduction he writes: “Most of these nineteen people will take part in dramatic, terrible events, but even so, our focus will be on everyday life during the war. In one sense, this is a piece of anti-history, in that I have tried to retrace this in every sense of the word epochal event to its minutest part, the individual person and his or her experiences.”

Translated from the Norwegian by Egil Fredheim.

--------
--------

La oss ta en omvei!

I 2011 har vi markert at Hordaland kunstsenter er 35 år, og vi har skapt et program som har utforsket historie(r) og framtid(er) med utgangspunkt i ulike temaer og institusjonelle rammeverk.
Vi startet året med å stille en rekke spørsmål vi mente var passende å stille i samtiden: Trenger vi å se nærmere på fortiden? Hvordan forbereder vi oss på framtiden? Er det mulig å agere som om samtiden er uavhengig av både historie og framtid? Eller ligger historie og framtid alltid på lur? Kanskje er samtiden holdt fast av historie, samtidig som den jager mot framtid? Gjennom fem utstillinger, forelesninger og seminar, i tillegg til nyproduserte tekster har vi samarbeidet med mange og ulike stemmer fra flere deler av verden, og dermed fortsatt å innta den dobbeltrollen det er å være en formidlingsinstitusjon og et fagsenter på samme tid.

Dette jubileumsprogrammet har med vilje unngått en selvmytologiserende innfallsvinkel, men heller fokusert på ideen om historie(r) og framtid(er) som samtidens rammeverk. Nostalgi og håp, å lengte etter det som har vært og lengte etter det som kommer, kan fungere som poetiske forestillinger i forhold til årets program.

Utfordringen har vært å finne ut hvordan vi kan lære oss å tenke nytt og finne nye metoder for å forstå forholdet mellom historie og framtid som er skissert i innledningen, med andre ord: hvordan forstå vår samtid. Det finnes ingen direkte vei til dette, så vi har måtte ty til omveier. Via omveier kan vi finne fram til stemmer som er trent i å utforske områder der mulighetene er uendelige.

Men før vi kommer fram til detaljene omkring årets program; la oss ta en omvei! Vi begynner med et eksperiment i visualisering: Prøv å beskrive tiden som omslutter en hendelse som et bilde, for eksempel den tiden som omslutter en kaotisk hendelse der utfallet er uvisst. Denne tiden befinner seg i hendelsens sentrum, men går så fort at den nesten er umulig å ta inn over seg. Tiden i et slik sentrum er kort, hurtig og forvirrende. Det er i denne tiden vi må stole på reflekser og intuisjoner, fordi det ikke er tid til å analysere eller reflektere over hendelsen som finner sted. Det er som om tiden ikke eksisterer i sentrum av en hendelse, eller sagt på en annen måte; det er som om den står stille fordi alt går for fort. Vi kan visualisere denne tiden som en prikk. Raskt og intuitivt setter vi en prikk på arket. Hendelsen trenger aldeles ikke være så dramatisk. Hverdagens tid går også fort. (For eksempel kan hendelsen være at noen kom til å ripe opp et negativ.)

La oss deretter fortsette med å se på tiden som ligger utenfor hendelsens sentrum. Vi tegner en stor sirkel omkring prikken, og dermed blir prikken hendelsens sentrum. I ytterkant av sirkelen går tiden sakte. Det tar lenger tid å bevege seg rundt hendelsens senter enn å erfare den; vi har bedre tid. Tiden her ute i kanten varer lenger, er langsom og oversiktlig, og vi får tid til å stoppe opp og analysere og reflektere over både hendelsen i sentrum, men også den avstanden vi nå har til hendelsen. (I denne tiden finner vi for eksempel at noen prøver å forhandle fram en kontrakt.)

Det er i spennet mellom disse to størrelsene, prikken i midten og sirkelbevegselen rundt den, at historien oppstår. Det er innenfor denne sirkelen vi blir enige med hverandre om hva som har hendt. Det er i dette landskapet vi vender oss mot øyenvitnet som beskriver hendelsen. (Her vil vi for eksempel kunne finne en beskrivelse av hvordan kunnskapen om å bygge en felle overleveres fra en person til en annen.)

I ytterkanten av sirkelen skapes vårt perspektiv. Sirkelen er nemlig så stor at vi ikke klarer å bevege oss rundt hele, men bare langs en del av omkretsen. Hele tiden har vi sammen med øyenvitnet blikket rettet mot sentrum av sirkelen for å forstå hendelsen som har funnet sted. Ubevisst, men i et forsøk på å analysere og reflektere, skaper vi et kakediagram. Dette triangellignende utsnittet av tiden omslutter hendelsen og blir til vår oppfatning av sakens kjerne. (Et arkiv er for eksempel et ypperlig eksempel på hvordan man skaper fysiske kakediagram.)

Kunsten har de siste tiårene påtatt seg rollen å lage ulike sammenstillinger av tiden som befinner seg innenfor sirkelen vår. Kunstneren foretar dypdykk ned i arkiver og skaper usymmetriske utsnitt av sirkelen, eller setter i gang aksjonistiske hendelser som er slike raskt nedtegnede prikker. (Dette kan vi se ved for eksempel å sammenstille flere kunstverk som er laget med tilsynelatende samme teknikk.)

Utfordringen vår nå er å se ut over den modellen som her er skissert opp. Kunsten kan ikke bare se tilbake på historien, og dermed nyansere vår forståelse av oss selv og av verden. Den kan og må romme noe mer, den kan gi oss muligheter til å bli utfordret og ta omveier som ligger utenfor sirkelen: Kunsten gir oss en opplevelse av at mulighetene er uendelige i det vi ikke kjenner. Forestillingsevnen beriker verden og gjør tiden vi lever i uendelig tilgjengelig uten å anta at størrelser som økonomisk vekst eller framskritt er våre eneste mål. La oss se nærmere på om vi er i stand til å benytte oss av vår forestillingsevne. La oss begynne med å skape en større forestilling av vår samtid.

Om vi går tilbake til modellen vi tegnet opp på vårt imaginære ark tidligere: Hva om vi ikke bare retter blikket mot midten av sirkelen. Hva om vi snur oss og ser ut av sirkelen? Hva finnes der ute, om ikke vår egen forestillingsevne. For å snu oss må vi benytte oss av er både intuisjon og refleksjon, både analyse og refleks. På en god dag finner vi kunsten der ute. Og det siste året håper vi at vi har vært med på å skape et sted hvor akkurat kunsten har funnet sted.

Len Lye var årets første utstilling. Her viste vi seks av hans filmer skapt mellom 1935 og 1979: A Colour Box (1935), Trade Tattoo (1937), Swinging the Lambeth Walk (1939), Rhythm (1957), Free Radicals (1958, omarbeidet 1979) og Particles in Space (1957). I tillegg bestilte vi tre spesialskrevne lydarbeider fra Espen Sommer Eide, Lasse Marhaug og Maia Urstad til hans film Tusalava (1929), en film hvis lydspor er forsvunnet, til et kveldsprogram vi kalte Len LIVE! Utstillingen var ikke en retrospektiv utstilling i den forstand at vi prøvde å gi en definitiv forståelse av Lyes kunstnerskap, men heller en undersøkelse av hvordan vi kan forholde oss til hans arbeider i dag. Lyes utgangspunkt var hele tiden bevegelse, og hans filmer ble skapt med nye metoder; han skrapte opp og malte direkte på celluloidfilm, såkalt ”direkte film”. På den måten kunne han utforske uttrykk på en ekspressiv måte som ellers ikke ville være mulig innen filmmediet. Lye undersøkte også skala i sine skulpturer, og noen ganger laget han flere versjoner av samme verk i ulik størrelse. Dermed trakk han også ideen om originalitet i tvil. I tråd med hans interesser skapte vi en situasjon hvor publikum måtte bevege seg i forhold til filmene for å se utstillingen, og innenfor et avgrenset område i galleriet flyttet filmene seg mellom skjermer i ulike størrelser i en tilfeldig rekkefølge. Ofte blir vi i utstillinger konfrontert med et statisk oppsett og en kalkulert presentasjon. Gjennom ny teknologi som ikke var tilgjengelig for Lye i hans livstid, skapte vi en mulighet til å se alle filmene på ulike måter.

Det er flere grunner til at Hordaland kunstsenter, som en del av programmet for vår 35-årsmarkering, for første gang viste en separatutstilling av en avdød kunstner. Den viktigste grunnen var i dette tilfellet vårt fortsatte engasjement for å undersøke hva kunstnere i dag interesserer seg for og vil diskutere. Lyes arbeider ble første gang omtalt på Hordaland kunstsenter da kunstner HC Gilje holdt en selvpresentasjon i forbindelse med sin egen utstilling, blink, hos oss i 2009. Med Len Lye er vår institusjonelle vilje å ta en av Bergens kunstneres interesse for en annen kunstners arbeid på alvor, og vi inviterte Gilje til å kuratere utstillingen sammen med oss.

Gjennom høsten 2010 og våren 2011 samarbeidet vi med den egyptiske kuratoren Sarah Rifky, og hun skapte utstillingsprosjektet The Bergen Accords der hun tok utgangspunkt i avtalen, eller kontrakten, som ble et tredelt prosjekt. The Bergen Accords begynte 1. mai på Torgalmenningen med oppsetningen av den levende skulpturen If not Us, Who? If not Now, When? av kunstnerduoen Anetta Mona Chi?a og Lucia Tká?ová. Dette verket fungerte som en prolog til den neste delen av prosjektet, en separatutstilling på Hordaland kunstsenter med nye og til dels stedsspesifikke arbeider av kunstneren Oraib Toukan som fikk tittelen This one is for the birds. Toukans arbeider ble på mange måter til gjennom direkte forhandlinger med kurator og institusjon, i tillegg til rent fysiske forhandlinger med utstillingsrommet. I tillegg til dette støttet vi Rifky i det at hun ønsket å føre fram et forslag om permanent å endre Hordaland kunstsenters navn, en prosess som fikk tittelen Name Change Act og som var en del av kunstsenterets indre anliggende fram til 1. september da styret på bakgrunn av innkomne forslag fra 26 kunstnere og kuratorer vedtok at vi skulle beholde vårt navn.

Det bør nevnes i denne sammenhengen av vår kollega Sarah i tiden opp mot utstillingen ble utfordret til å tenke prosjektet på nytt og på nytt, takket være den ekstraordinære situasjonen som oppsto i hennes hjemby, Kairo. Prosesser som startet i februar i år, og som fortsatt pågår, har nok vært med på å forme The Bergen Accords og vil nok være med på å forme måten vi ser på akkurat dette prosjektet i lang tid.

I 2011 var det første gang på mange år at Hordaland kunstsenter hadde en utstilling åpen over sommeren. Vi valgte å vise et verk av kunstneren Omer Fast, Nostalgia fra 2009, som er et tredelt omhyggelig oppbygget filmnarrativ der han bruker øyenvitnet som kilde. Hans arbeid balanserer mellom det sannsynlige og fiktive, og nerven gjennom loopene, skjermene og projeksjonene er sympatisk, muligens til og med empatisk. Verket ble vist første gang på South London Gallery, og springer ut av intervjuer med immigranter i Storbritannia. Immigrantene blir fortellere, og gjennom det som i europeiske øyne ser ut til å være et postapokalyptisk samfunn blir vi gjennom et filmatisk rollebytte selv gjort til øyenvitner av immigrantens hindre og vanskeligheter i det ”vi” prøver å søke tilflukt i det lokkende fredelige og velstående Afrika.

Påstanden i verket er enkel nok i dét det setter en virkelig situasjon for mange på hodet, dermed benytter Fast et gammelt fortellertriks for å la ”sannheten” skinne gjennom. Men denne påstanden vevde også et sammensatt nett av spørsmål som var og fortsatt er viktige å stille i den nordeuropeiske sammenhengen. Det er naivt å tro at alle ville, hadde de hatt sjansen, bryte opp og migrere. Samtidig er det naivt å tro at all migrasjon er frivillig. I spenningen mellom disse to påstandene er et vidstrakt felt fylt av begrunnelser, forpliktelser, håp, drømmer og krefter. Dessverre forsvinner dette feltet i mediebildene og debattene, noe som gjør at vi mente at akkurat dette verket var viktig å se, diskutere og oppleve. Uventet ble også vår sommerutstilling aktualisert av hendelser utenfor kunstsenteret med hendelsene den 22. Juli i Oslo og på Utøya.

Etter en turbulent sommer, åpnet vi et nytt utstillingsprosjekt som Hordaland kunstsenter og kunstneren Elsebeth Jørgensen har arbeidet med siden 2008. I begynnelsen av 2010 startet vi den praktiske gjennomføringen av det som ble til Ways of Losing Oneself in an Image. I godt samarbeid med Billedsamlingen ved Universitetet i Bergen – Avdeling for spesialsamlinger, og spesielt deres førstebibliotekar Solveig Greve, fikk denne utstillingen flere elementer til å gå opp i en høyere enhet. Alt materialet til verket ble hentet fra Billedsamlingen, og likt et arkiv skapte Jørgensen et verk med flere enn en inngang. Hennes arbeider har i flere år sirklet omkring ulike ideer om stedsdokumentasjon, historisitet og montasjefortelling, samt hvordan arkivariske prosesser og konstruksjonen av kollektiv hukommelse fører til ambivalens og dilemmaer knyttet til ideer om bevaring, utvelging, systematisering og betydningen av det subjektive blikket.

Jørgensen iakttok dette arkivet som helhet i et år, og i Ways of Losing Oneself in an Image ble de historiske dokumentene sammenstilt med hennes egne kunstneriske registreringer. Prosjektet springer ut av en interesse for bildearkivets poetiske narrative potensial og den utilgjengelige delen av samlingen her i Bergen; det enda ikke registrerte materialet, i tillegg til stedets eget meta-arkivmateriale. I Jørgensens bearbeiding av dette materialet ble fakta blandet med fiksjon, og hun reflekterte over hvordan historisk informasjon kan brukes som en hypotetisk fundering over vår forestilling om framtiden.

Årets siste utstilling ble kuratert av Glenn Adamson, som er leder av forskningsavdelingen og av masterstudiet ved Victoria & Albert Museum i London. I møte med et mye mindre utstillingsrom enn han vanligvis er vant til ble dette en utforsking i miniatyr av forholdet mellom tekstil og fotografi. Som Adamson skriver i innledningen i sin tekst som følger utstillingen: Tekstiler og fotografi: de to mediene later i første omgang til å være uforenlige. På den ene siden har man et møysommelig langsomt håndverk, og på den annen en umiddelbar og automatisk prosess. Den ene er skapende, den andre registrerende.

Utstillingen fokuserte på muligheten som finnes i Jaquardveven til å forene disse to teknikkene, og viste vevarbeider av kunstnerne Chuck Close, Lia Cook, Kari Dyrdal og Johanna Friedman som sammen skapte et fotografisk landskap i utstillingen gjennom ulike tilnærminger til og bruk av samme teknikk. Karina Presttun videreførte de mulighetene som finnes for lagvis oppbygging av bilder i digital fotobehandling til et romlig uttrykk i sitt stoffcollage, og Sabrina Gschwandtner og Kate Nartker benyttet en annen krysspollinering av de to mediene gjennom sine videoarbeider: Gschwandtner gjennom en dokumentarisk video som mest kan betegnes som et lydstudie som spredte seg gjennom rommet og Kate Nartker gjennom en time-lapse video av vevde stillbilder som sammen ble til utstillingens andre videoarbeid.

I tillegg til årets utstillinger har vi arrangert våre sedvanlige Masterhelger, der vi i år har vist to ulike installasjoner. På våren laget Jason Dunne installasjonen Potemkin Village der en mannsfigur i ulike størrelser repeteres nesten i det uendelige og skaper et samfunn betrakteren ikke automatisk kunne få innpass i, og på høsten gjenskapte Gabriel Johann Kvendseth et arbeidsrom i gallerirommet som huset hans installasjon Prototyper: ARSENAL.

Selv om vi har benyttet hele året til å føre en diskusjon om histori(er) og framtid(er) som en ett år lang jubileumsmarkering, ønsket vi allikevel å markere året med en feiring av det spesifikke. I oktober inviterte vi dermed til seminaret Et lite stykke anti-historie der vi inviterte fire kunstnere som tidligere har hatt utstillinger på Hordaland kunstsenter til å snakke. Torbjørn Kvasbø (separatutstillinger i oktober 1987 og mars 1993), Talleiv Taro Manum (separatutstilling i mai 1998) og Eva Kun (separatutstillinger i september 1988 og mai 2003) holdt forelesninger og presentasjoner og Kurt Johannessen (flere performancer og separatutstillinger i september 1988 og mai 2004) holdt et performanceforedrag spesielt for anledningen.

Dette seminaret var altså ikke snakk om en omfattende institusjonell historieskriving, men heller et stykke anti-historie [1], i det at vi beskrev den tiden vi har holdt til på Klosteret 17 (siden 1985) gjennom de minste, og mest avgjørende, bestanddelene: et utvalg konkrete utstillinger representert gjennom kunstnerne hvis verk ble vist.

Når man står ovenfor en institusjons historie, så kan man få følelsen av å være både overrumplet og overkjørt. Det å ville tematisere en slik historie stiller krav, og byr på en del utfordringer. Spesielt siden institusjonen og dens hverdag jo skal opprettholdes i samme åndedrag som man snur seg tilbake og ser på historien. Vi ble tvunget til å ta en del drastiske valg i forberedelsene av dette seminaret, som vi mener har gjort dette til både et poetisk og et konstruktivt innlegg i forhold til hva et kunstsenter kan være. Ved å velge å fokusere på den tiden Hordaland kunstsenter har eksistert på Klosteret ble mye av det som ble sagt denne dagen ikke bare abstrakte minnebilder, men nærmest mulig å ”fysisk etterprøve”. Vi var i stand til å si at det var DETTE som skjedde HER. I tillegg førte våre rammer til at vi utelukkende å fokusere på kunsten som var blitt vist.

Nå kan det sies at det å feire at en institusjon er 35 år er et merkelig jubileum å markere. Og det er det. Grunnen til at vi har benyttet denne anledningen er at kunstsentrene i Norge er formidlingsstrukturer vi mener ikke verdsettes nok, og deres rolle som både publikums og fagfelts felles kunstinstitusjoner feires veldig sjelden. Det ville vi gjøre noe med, og håper at vi har lykkes.

--------
[1] I introduksjonen til boken Stridens skjønnhet og sorg reflekterer historiker og forfatter Peter Englund over det arbeidet han har gjort: over 600 sider bok basert på personlige notater og dagbøker fra nitten mennesker i ulik alder og med ulik nasjonalitet og tilhørighet, som levde gjennom første verdenskrig. I slutten av introduksjonen skriver han: ”De flesta av dessa nitton kommer att vara med om både dramatiska och förfärliga ting, men fokus ligger trots detta på krigets vardag. I en mening är detta ett stycke anti-historia, i det at jag har sökt att återföra denna på alla vis epokgörande händelse till dess minsta, atomära beståndsdel, nämligen den enskilda människan och hennes upplevelse.”