North of the South was published as an introuduction in the book 3R's Maroc, a project by Seamus Farrell for MultiPistes curated by Abdellah Karroum; a collaborative platform featuring artistic productions, site-specific projects and publications.

One week in August 2007 the artist Seamus Farrell created the workshop 3 R’s Maroc together with artists* and art students** in the North of Morocco.

Making the pavement outside Espace 150x295 cm*** in Martil the space of the workshop meant that 3 R’s Maroc was claiming and creating its own specific place. The participants worked in public and any passerby could stop to watch them engrave different types of glass, watch the process of learning and the practice that took place, even take part themselves. The act of instruction is also the act of transformation, transformation of knowledge as well as skills. At the core of this workshop was also the act of transformation in another, more practical, sense: The 3 Rs being reduce, re-use, recycle the artist and participants were acting out the 3 R’s in public.

Based on discussions on immediate and mediated current affairs, the participants recreated glass objects from the street into telling objects. In many cases newspaper headlines worked as poignant reminders of the surroundings. Through personal histories and experiences mixed with appropriated sentences from the news, the objects coming out of this workshop addresses a wide variety of issues. Two of the headlines in the newspaper read Damn contemporary art in Morocco, another: Ten Million Tourists. The first headline refers to the media’s reaction to an artist’s work which can be seen reproduced in the newspaper pictured on page 20, and the second is a prediction of how many tourists will find their way to Morocco in 2010. This wave of guests impacts everything in contemporary Morocco, creating a transformation of landscapes: economic landscapes, social landscapes, cultural landscapes and natural landscapes. The participants’ different ecologies have been and will continue to be modified by these changes, in this instance resulting in personal statements and images on the different recycled glasses and mirrors.

The title of the workshop thus indicates transformation of objects and ideas. Experiments of transformation happened both physically and philosophically. Seamus Farrell started by asking the participants: what if Morocco was the North, trying to think the world upside-down or back-to-front. In a time when recycling and reusing is re-entering the Northern mainstream consciousness through the media, the tradition of creating and inventing new areas of utilisations for discarded materials is still very much alive in The Global South. Much like stories and myths, objects travel too, from one person to the next. Practical needs generally dictate how objects are recycled and reused. In the case of some of the participants in this workshop, the skills could possibly also be reused and recycled into future opportunities outside of the art context. 3R’s Maroc addressed the need to discuss the participant’s current situations, which in turn dictated how the knowledge and glass objects were recreated; made new.

* Including Faouzi Laatiris, Batoul S'Himi, Younes Rahmoun and others.

** Students from the Institute of Fine Arts in Tétouan, including Mohssin Harraki, Mohamed Arejdal and others.

***Espace 150 x 295 cm is an independent art space founded by artists Faouzi Laatiris and Batoul S'Himi in 2006. Workshops and exhibitions are organised with the intention of sharing experiences and developing the local art scene, inviting students, artists, workers, women organisations and the general audience to participate.

North of the South was published as an introuduction in the book 3R's Maroc, a project by Seamus Farrell for MultiPistes curated by Abdellah Karroum; a collaborative platform featuring artistic productions, site-specific projects and publications.

One week in August 2007 the artist Seamus Farrell created the workshop 3 R’s Maroc together with artists* and art students** in the North of Morocco.

Making the pavement outside Espace 150x295 cm*** in Martil the space of the workshop meant that 3 R’s Maroc was claiming and creating its own specific place. The participants worked in public and any passerby could stop to watch them engrave different types of glass, watch the process of learning and the practice that took place, even take part themselves. The act of instruction is also the act of transformation, transformation of knowledge as well as skills. At the core of this workshop was also the act of transformation in another, more practical, sense: The 3 Rs being reduce, re-use, recycle the artist and participants were acting out the 3 R’s in public.

Based on discussions on immediate and mediated current affairs, the participants recreated glass objects from the street into telling objects. In many cases newspaper headlines worked as poignant reminders of the surroundings. Through personal histories and experiences mixed with appropriated sentences from the news, the objects coming out of this workshop addresses a wide variety of issues. Two of the headlines in the newspaper read Damn contemporary art in Morocco, another: Ten Million Tourists. The first headline refers to the media’s reaction to an artist’s work which can be seen reproduced in the newspaper pictured on page 20, and the second is a prediction of how many tourists will find their way to Morocco in 2010. This wave of guests impacts everything in contemporary Morocco, creating a transformation of landscapes: economic landscapes, social landscapes, cultural landscapes and natural landscapes. The participants’ different ecologies have been and will continue to be modified by these changes, in this instance resulting in personal statements and images on the different recycled glasses and mirrors.

The title of the workshop thus indicates transformation of objects and ideas. Experiments of transformation happened both physically and philosophically. Seamus Farrell started by asking the participants: what if Morocco was the North, trying to think the world upside-down or back-to-front. In a time when recycling and reusing is re-entering the Northern mainstream consciousness through the media, the tradition of creating and inventing new areas of utilisations for discarded materials is still very much alive in The Global South. Much like stories and myths, objects travel too, from one person to the next. Practical needs generally dictate how objects are recycled and reused. In the case of some of the participants in this workshop, the skills could possibly also be reused and recycled into future opportunities outside of the art context. 3R’s Maroc addressed the need to discuss the participant’s current situations, which in turn dictated how the knowledge and glass objects were recreated; made new.

* Including Faouzi Laatiris, Batoul S'Himi, Younes Rahmoun and others.

** Students from the Institute of Fine Arts in Tétouan, including Mohssin Harraki, Mohamed Arejdal and others.

***Espace 150 x 295 cm is an independent art space founded by artists Faouzi Laatiris and Batoul S'Himi in 2006. Workshops and exhibitions are organised with the intention of sharing experiences and developing the local art scene, inviting students, artists, workers, women organisations and the general audience to participate.