This text was commissioned by artist Patrik Entian on the occation of the completion of his three year fellowship with the Bergen National Academy of the Arts.

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

Polar Pulse

Through his painterly investigations Patrik Entian has for years explored the world through signs and maps, photography and media images. Though his imagery is simple in the same way as popular culture is seductive, we should still approach it by way of critical inquiry. Rather than represent the world, Entian re-represents it. It is not a case of verifying truth, but of applying a searching mind to one’s surroundings, including the world of images and the technology shaping this world. He has chosen to apply a methodically painterly activity in his long-term project, exploring the way we register, and thereby also represent, the world about us through different technological methods.

In an age when we think everything has already been discovered and mapped out, we find it hard to believe that anything new is still to be discovered. This opens up possibilities, ways of looking at what already is there. This is where Entian has found his field of interest, as he dwells on pictures that most of us would pass by and forget.

One of Entian’s most controversial paintings is of a photograph of Orderud farm, displayed at the Department of Information, Science and Media Studies at the University of Bergen, as part of a major series of works for public spaces. Here we should remember that the “controversy” was manifested in a somewhat critical newspaper article prompted by a whiff of sensation. The matter may have been aired at a department meeting or two where employees discussed where to hang the painting, so as not to cause offence to anyone. The photograph, and hence the painting, depicts the farmhouse, the yard and the pensioner’s cottage where three family members were shot dead at Pentecost in 1999. Thus the inspiration for the painting was an ordinary photograph of a farm with historical roots as deep as those of aviation history. Traditionally, Norwegians have their farm photographed from the air, as a way of documenting the hard work that has gone into creating a home and a work place for oneself and one’s family. The picture which is Entian’s point of departure might just as well have been enlarged, framed and hung over a sofa or in a den. A university institute where complex structures of our (mediated) world are examined on a daily basis, actually felt challenged by the painting of a landscape. Unlike the photograph, the painting did not document a farm where people had been murdered, where morality had been shaken. Rather, the painting was an indirect documentation of the media coverage and analysis of the immoral acts, thereby raising questions of journalism ethics. Entian’s painting, Orderud gård, juxtaposes morality and immorality, traditional praise for farming, farmers and the work of the individual was set beside a triple murder.

If we construct a model consisting exclusively of images of the world, with Entian’s paintings exploring this model, we find that he is consistently operating at a meta-level. His visual interests are concerned with representation, and the world that he examines is the already mediated reality. In order to explore this representation, Entian’s tools of choice are the Internet and volume, and he employs the titles of his works as clues so that everyone should realise that he is exploring representations of the world through rerepresentation. Quite unsentimentally, we are invited into his model of the world, the titles of his works revealing how he connects, quietly and precisely, with major trends in society, like a spaceship bringing supplies to the International Space Station. All the while working in his studio.

You could say Patrik Entian’s studio resembles a space station. Here he can observe the world at a safe distance. Here he investigates what this observation actually is, he explores what knowledge about the picture provides us with, as well as how this can be turned into new images and new knowledge. What he shows us, is what he has seen. He has not experienced the things he displays, but he has definitely seen them, and he presents us with an experience of what he has seen.

They say that the English painter J. M.W. Turner (1775-1851) had himself tied to the mast of a ship so that he could see what a tempest was like. What he really did was experience an actual storm. This experience goes far beyond the purely perceptual. It was physical in a way that is more comprehensive and incredible than anything those of us who have not been tied to the mast of a ship during a storm can fathom by looking at Turner’s paintings. In other words, Entian’s project is quite different, as his relationship to his source material is purely perceptual. He observes and performs a close reading of our everyday world of images. This perceptual experience is then moulded into new images. Even so, his Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) affords us a transformation that resembles Turner’s: As a product of new technologies, what is here described as “purely perceptual” in our day and age, is juxtaposed with, but not equal to, experience.

The difference between looking and experiencing is huge, but hard to discern. The task of the artist is to point out this difference, but also to infuse it with meaning. These are difficult perspectives that must be navigated, and as an individual one must find one’s focus, one’s area of interest. Entian’s interest is painting, as well as what painting can contribute to our visually chaotic world. You might say, that in our visual paradigm, where images have become just as important as text, and where popular culture takes precedence, art has lost out. The artist may be seen to have lost out. If so, this loss is temporary. While the producers of popular culture may polish visual strategies designed to make us believe in what is being communicated (and often put up for sale), the artist must always treat his own visual language with suspicion. As viewers, we must trust the artist’s eye, just as we must be sceptical of popular culture. In this way, the artist may initiate dispassionate debates by tapping into a tactic of confusion, avoiding polemics.
We are spoilt voyeurs these days. We have seen so much, and experienced almost as much. The way we experience images is akin to the way we experience the world. Images are no longer strangers, or instructive, or stirring, they just are. They are a part of the world. The image is part of our society, just as bureaucracy is a part of that same society, a kind of constant. Quietly present, all the time. And these days a large proportion of the images we see are digital. Digital images float around the world just like ideas do, caught by those who need them, and Entian is someone who needs images all the time.

Digital technology is an optimal tool for those who make archives available to the public, a public consisting of, among others, artists like Entian. Like someone searching through an archive, or going on a space mission, he surveys some of the images of the world. In recent years and through different projects, he has used his paintings to transfer a fleeting, digital visual world to the material world. Be it through repeating, almost mechanical exercises like Friends of Mu (2008). On 6 x 6 x 2 cm blocks of wood he painted the profile pictures of the circle of friends at the alternative art arena Sound of Mu from the social network underskog.no. Or like his series of diary paintings from 2012 where he converted the MMS’es from friends and his own mobile phone photographs to the A4 format, forcing himself to paint using fast strokes, not with a brush, but with a palette knife.

Having started near to home, with pictures from his own social sphere, he has made the leap into the world with Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image). Like an astronaut, Entian has set off on a journey that has taken him far afield. He has repeatedly gone off to Antarctica, but the pictures he has brought back are mere fragments of a reality that others have decided for him. It would be a mistake to think that the fragment can reflect the whole. This is a long-term case of harvesting webcam images that are updated every tenth minute and transferred to a silent crowd over the Internet.

The American author Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) reportedly said that it is hard to understand how Picasso could paint the way he did, not even having sat in an aeroplane. Entian’s paintings remind us that our vision changes as technologies change, and thanks to the over-mediated world we inhabit, we also have access to new ways of seeing as we make use of everyday methods, such as the Internet. Thus it is not hard to understand how Entian can paint landscapes of Antarctica without going there.

In recent years Entian has downloaded and collected images from the German research station Neumayer in Antarctica, at the Ekström Ice Shelf on the coast of Queen Maud Land, to be precise. All his source materials for the project Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) stem from a single camera, the one belonging to PALAOA – Perennial Acoustic Observatory in the Antarctic Ocean – located in the observatory mast. The camera is of a kind that listens to the sea, its function being to scan the frozen wasteland, making it possible for researchers to see if their equipment outside the station is intact.

The images resemble a diary in that they construct a detailed survey of a very small slice of the world on two planes – one horizontal, and one that appears to be vertical, i.e. the ice and the sky. As Entian uses these images as a point of departure for his paintings, we are often looking at two abstracted surfaces in one image. The weather and the daily rhythm makes the two planes of the images change colour and character, even turning into an entirely monochrome surface, as in Sunrise, sunset, sunrise, sunset. In addition to the painterly qualities of the project, we also observe something else: the re-representation which is the basis of the entire project. The paintings turn into abstractions, but also painterly documentations as the image is transferred from a digital to a material format, but what do they abstract and document, and why is it that turning these images into material ones is important to Entian? In the first place, the tempo is greatly reduced: both the time it takes to create it and the time it takes to look at the images. Secondly, the image is strengthened, the abstractions becoming more abstract. First through technology and then through the painterly, meaningful layers appear in Entian’s project as it is pointed out that our way of relating to the world is radically different from what it used to be; this becomes clear in the transmission, and thus in the representation and re-representation. Further, knowing where the motives are taken from lends another layer of meaning to the two previous ones. Despite the frequently abstract manifestation, we are here talking about rather realistic and documentary images; the key to this knowledge is often conveyed through the titles. Entian’s tactic of confusion arises through this shift from the abstract to the representational, as the viewer is tossed between the abstraction of the image and its actual origin.

The artist and the landscape he paints are located in almost diametrically opposite parts of the world. If we were still visual innocents, we would have found it well-nigh impossible to comprehend how you can observe the weather at the other end of the world from inside a studio. But for today’s eyes, so bereft of innocence, this is a feature of everyday life. The English painter John Constable (1776-1837), on the other hand, was out of doors, in close contact with the elements, as he registered cloud formations and the fall of the light, noting time and wind direction on the back of his small paintings: "31 Sepr 10-11 o'clock morning looking Eastward a gentle wind to East." His observations of the clouds must surely have made him realise the influence of wind directions on the weather. Similarly, the researchers in Antarctica know that minor changes in the temperature of the sea under the ice shelf govern the ocean currents of the world.

It seems as if minor changes have greater, or at least more undreamt-of, consequences nowadays than before. If the webcam at Neumeyer fails, an artist in a studio at the other side of the globe will be shaken out of his routine, out of the stream of images with two or one plane. Suddenly, the image changes, and the observant viewer may possibly see the inside of a research station and something we may surmise would be researchers having their morning coffee roundabout nine o’clock on a given morning. Suddenly, daily life turns sensational, but the stream of images has only been halted temporarily, the camera soon back at its customary observation point. As faithful as only a mechanical or digital tool can be. Which means that when the camera breaks down, it is also faithfully defective, which probably gave Entian the repertoire for his work Looking for Painting – Following the webcam at the Neumayer Station, Antarctica daily from June 1st to August 10th in Painting. Even if this period of time may throw up a discrepancy, in its context it is in no way sensational, not like the researchers’ coffee break was, and so he does not employ that logic which so often is the driving force behind the image-created reality which surrounds us: sensationalism.

In this series of paintings, presented as a monumental wall-mounted installation, we see a repeated fragment of a window sill with a focus so myopic that it is hard to tell what is happening outside. Knowledge of imaging technology and the way it is affected by lighting are the only means available if you want these particular paintings to be the documentation of the passing of time rather than of a defective camera. The line of reasoning, then, is that section and tone are the same in all the pictures as you may assume that the lighting inside the research station prevents the camera from picking up changes in the outside light, and hence, documents the passing of time. After all, we must remember that our northern summer means winter in the south... On the other hand, I am afraid we must question the images. This sustained image is in all likelihood a digital lie, or something approaching a digital dream. This part of the project Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) is a very tangible illustration of the interface between documentation and abstraction. By repeating the archiving of the same image throughout the whole period, the artist identifies with the digital tool which he employs as part of his research method. Using unsensational effects, he lets his project insist that we also direct our attention to the way the world is captured through the world of images, not just at what is caught in this model, which is Entian’s universe.

Let us continue taking as our point of departure what this little section of the world is an indication of, besides being a tool for research. In Entian’s versions, this section is more than en aesthetic exploration. What we are dealing with, is a previously “empty” landscape whose only function in our everyday world of thought has been that of being a point where the world meets up with itself, where west can turn into east or morning can turn into evening, in many ways a no-man's land. But as we know, a no-manse's land is also a land, and in recent years the poles have become just as highly charged as the nation-state. There is a race on in the north, with a Russian minisub planting its flag under the ice, and the Norwegian prime minister travelling south for the first time in order to register national interests. So Norway has interests at both poles: Huge riches of oil are presumed to exist under the Arctic Sea, and the melting of the ice in the north may lead to the opening of new trade routes at sea. In spite of agreements that Antarctica is not to be used for military or commercial gain, research may be carried out at the South Pole, and these days, knowledge is also business. Through technological advances, it has become possible to tap into the uninhabitable in other ways, and geopolitical tension is no longer like a hefty east-west belt stretching round the world, but also like two pulsating, white poles.

Art history demands that art be decipherable. Contemporary art can not instantly comply with this. We must use other kinds of knowledge than that provided by art history when examining today’s art. Rather than look to the past or to the future, we must look sideways, to see art in light of what surrounds it. For instance, by making use of factual knowledge we may create leaks between paintings and our own world. And so, just as in the picture of the farmyard, through Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) and the painterly documentation of photographs of the world, Entian shows us how our images are pregnant with everything that exists outside the frame.

Translated from the Norwegian by Egil Fredheim.

---------

Polpuls

Patrik Entian har i mange år gjennom sin maleriske utforsking forholdt seg indirekte til verden, gjennom tegn og kart, fotografi og mediebilder. Selv om hans billedspråk er enkelt, på samme måte som populærkultur er forførende, skal vi allikevel stille kritiske spørsmål i møte med den. Istedenfor å representere så re-representerer Entian vår verden. Det er ikke snakk om å være sannhetsvitne, men å ha et granskende blikk på verden omkring seg, inkludert bildeverden og den teknologien som skaper denne verden. I sitt langvarige prosjekt har han bestemt seg for, gjennom en metodisk malerisk aktivitet, å undersøke hvordan vi gjennom ulike teknologiske metoder registrerer, og dermed representerer, verden omkring oss.

I en tid da vi mener at alt er oppdaget og kartlagt er det vanskelig å tro at vi kan oppdage noe nytt. Dette åpner nye muligheter for å se på det vi allerede har tilgjengelig. Det er i denne sammenhengen at Entian har funnet sin interesse når han dveler ved bilder som vanligvis ville blitt forbigått og glemt.

Et av Entians mest kontroversielle malerier er fra et foto av Orderud gård som ble hengt opp på Institutt for informasjons- og medievitenskap på Universitetet i Bergen i 2006 som del av en større serie verk for offentlige rom. I denne sammenhengen må vi huske at det ”kontroversielle” manifesterte seg i en sensasjonsdrevet, og forsiktig kritisk, avisartikkel. Kanskje ble saken tatt opp på et instituttmøte, eller to, der de ansatte diskuterte hvor maleriet burde henge for ikke å støte noen. Fotoet, og dermed maleriet, viser gårdstunet med våningshuset og kårstuen der tre familiemedlemmer ble funnet skutt i pinsen 1999. Utgangspunktet for maleriet er dermed et ordinært fotografi av en gård, med historiske røtter like langt tilbake som flyhistorien. I Norge har vært vanlig å avfotografere gården sin fra luften, som et oversiktsdokument over det harde arbeidet man har lagt ned i å skape et hjem og en arbeidsplass for seg og sine. Bildet som er utgangspunktet til Entian kunne like gjerne blitt forstørret, rammet inn i glass og ramme, for deretter å bli hengt opp over en sofa eller i en kjellerstue. En universitetsavdeling som til daglig undersøker komplekse strukturer i vår (medierte) verden viste seg faktisk utfordret av et landskapsmaleri. Maleriet dokumenterte ikke, slik fotografiet hadde gjort, en gård der det var begått drap, der moralen hadde fått en knekk. Maleriet dokumenterte derimot indirekte mediene som omtalte og analyserte de umoralske handlingene, og stilte dermed spørsmål om presseetikk. Entians maleri Orderud gård sidestiller det moralske og det umoralske, den tradisjonsrike hyllesten av jordbruket, bonden og det egne arbeidet ble sidestilt med et trippeldrap.

Hvis vi lager en modell som utelukkende består av avbildninger av verden, og Entians malerier undersøker denne modellen, ser vi at han hele tiden opererer på et metanivå. Den verden han behandler er den allerede mediert virkeligheten, og hans visuelle interesser er representasjon. For å kunne undersøke dette bruker han internett og mengde som verktøy, og for at alle skal bli oppmerksomme på at Entian undersøker representasjoner av verden gjennom re-representasjon benytter han verkstitlene som ledetråder. Usentimentalt blir vi invitert inn i hans modell av verden, og gjennom titlene kan vi se at verkene hans også kobler seg stille og presist på større samfunnsstrømninger lik et romskip med forsyninger til Den internasjonale romstasjonen. Og hele tiden jobber han i sitt atelier.

Man kan si at Patrik Entians atelier ligner en romstasjon. Herfra kan han observere verden på trygg avstand. Her undersøker han hva denne observasjonen faktisk er, han undersøker hva kunnskap om bildet gir oss, og hvordan dette kan formes om til nye bilder og ny kunnskap. Det han viser oss er det han har sett. Han har ikke erfart det han viser, men han har absolutt sett det, og det han gir oss er en erfaring av det han har sett.

Det sies at den engelske maleren J. M.W. Turner (1775-1851) lot seg binde fast i en skipsmast for å kunne se hvordan en storm så ut. Det han egentlig gjorde var å erfare stormen i et direkte forhold. Denne erfaringen strekker seg langt ut over den rent perseptuelle. Det var fysisk på en mer omfattende og ufattelig måte enn vi som ikke har vært bundet fast i en skipsmast under storm kan forstå ved å se Turners malerier. Det er med andre ord et helt annet prosjekt Entian har fore, da hans forhold til sitt grunnmateriale utelukkende er perseptuelt. Han iakttar og nærleser vår hverdagslige billedverden. Den perseptuelle erfaringen bearbeides deretter til nye bilder. Allikevel gir hans Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) oss en lignende bearbeiding som den Turner foretok: Som et resultat av nye teknologier er det som her beskrives som ”rent perseptuelt” i vår tid sidestilt, men ikke likestilt, med erfaring.

Det er stor forskjell mellom det å se og det å erfare, som er vanskelig å få øye på. Kunstnerens oppgave er å påvise denne forskjellen, men også gi den mening. Det er vanskelige posisjoner som må navigeres, og man må som enkeltperson finne sitt fokus, sin interesse. Entians interesse er maleriet, og hva dette kan bidra med i dagens visuelt kaotiske verden. I vårt visuelle paradigme, der bildet har fått like stor betydning som tekst og populærkulturen har forrang, kan man påstå at kunsten har tapt. Kunstneren kan sies å ha tapt. Dette er i så fall et forbigående tap. For mens de som produserer populærkulturen kan finpusse visuelle strategier laget for at vi skal tro på det som kommuniseres (og ofte selges), må kunstneren hele tiden tvile på sitt eget visuelle språk. Vår oppgave som betraktere er å stole på kunstnerens blikk, på samme måte som vi må tvile på populærkulturen. Kunstneren kan på den måte starte saklige debatter, uten å polemisere, gjennom å benytte seg av en forvirringstaktikk.

Vi er bortskjemte kikkere i dag. Vi har sett så mye, og opplevd nesten like mye. Måten vi erfarer bilder er tilnærmet lik den måten vi erfarer verden på. Bildene er ikke lenger fremmede, eller instruktive, eller oppsiktsvekkende, de er bare der. De er en del av verden. På samme måte som byråkratiet er en del av vårt samfunn som en slags konstant, er bildet en del av det samme samfunnet. Stille til stede i alle tilfeller. Og de bildene vi ser i dag er i stor grad digitale. På samme måte som ideer flyter digitale bilder rundt i verden og fanges opp av de som trenger dem, og Entian er en som trenger bilder hele tiden.

Å benytte seg av digital teknologi fungerer optimalt for å gjøre arkiv tilgjengelig for offentligheten, som blant annet er befolket av kunstnere, slik som Entian. Lik en som leter i et arkiv eller drar på romferd kikker han seg gjennom noen av verdens bilder. Gjennom ulike prosjekter de siste årene har han med maleriene sine overført en digital og forgjengelig visuell verden til den materielle verden. Det være seg gjennom repeterende, og nesten mekaniske, øvelser slik som Friends of Mu (2008). På 6 x 6 x 2 cm store treklosser malte han profilbildene til vennekretsen til den alternative kunstarenaen Sound of Mu på det sosiale nettstedet underskog.no. Eller slik som i hans serie dagboksmalerier fra 2010 der han i A4-størrelse forstørret opp og malte venners MMS og sine egne mobiltelefonfotografier, og tvang seg selv til å male uten pensel, men i rask takt med en palettkniv.

Fra disse nære omgivelsene, bilder som tilhører hans egen sosiale sfære, har han med Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) tatt et sprang ut i verden. Som en astronaut har Entian lagt ut på en reise som har ført ham langt avgårde. Gjentatte ganger har han begitt seg til Antarktis, men bildene han har tatt med seg tilbake er bare bruddstykker av en virkelighet som andre har bestemt for ham. Det vil være en feiltagelse å tro at bruddstykket kan speile helheten. Det dreier seg her om en langsiktig innhøsting av webkamerabilder som oppdateres hvert tiende minutt, og sendes ut via internett til en taus masse.

Det er sagt at den amerikanske forfatteren Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) en gang har uttalt at det var vanskelig å forstå hvordan Picasso kunne male slik han gjorde, han som ikke en gang hadde vært i en flymaskin. Maleriene til Entian minner oss om at blikket endres når teknologien endres, og i og med den overmedierte verden vi lever i, har vi også tilgang til nye måter å se på ved å bruke hverdagslige metoder, så som internett. Det er dermed ikke lenger vanskelig å forstå hvordan Entian kan male landskapene i Antarktis uten å reise dit selv.

De siste årene har Entian lastet ned og samlet bilder fra den tyske forskningsstasjonen Neumayer i Antarktis, nærmere bestemt på Ekströmisen, en isbrem ved kysten av Dronning Maud Land. Alt hans materiale til prosjektet Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) kommer fra ett eneste kamera, det som tilhører PALAOA - PerenniAL Acoustic Observatory in the Antarctic Ocean og er plassert i masten til observatoriet. Kameraet tilhører de som hører på havet, og dets funksjon er å se utover isødet for at forskerne skal kunne se om forskningsutstyret deres utenfor stasjonen er intakt.

Lik en dagbok skaper bildene en detaljert oversikt over et veldig lite utsnitt av verden som inneholder to plan; et horisontalt og et tilsynelatende vertikalt, altså isen og himmelen. Når Entian skaper malerier med disse bildene som utgangspunkt er det ofte to abstraherte flater i ett bilde vi ser på. Døgnets rytme og værforhold gjør at bildenes to plan endrer farge og karakter, og noen ganger til og med blir til én helt monokrom flate, slik vi ser i Sunrise, sunset, sunrise, sunset. I tillegg til de maleriske kvalitetene i prosjektet er det også noe annet vi ser på: re-representasjonen som er grunnlaget til hele prosjektet. Maleriene blir abstraksjoner, men også maleriske dokumentasjoner idet bildet overføres fra et digitalt til et materielt format, men hva er det de abstraherer og dokumenterer, og hvorfor er det viktig for Entian å gjøre disse bildene materielle? For det første senkes tempoet betraktelig: både den tiden det tar å lage og den tiden det tar å se bildene endres. For det andre så skjer en forsterking av bildet, abstraksjonene blir mer abstrakte. Først gjennom teknologien og deretter det maleriske oppstår meningsbærende lag i Entians prosjekt når det blir poengtert at vår måte å forholde oss til verden er radikalt annerledes enn tidligere, og det er i overføringen og dermed representasjonen og re-representasjonen at dette tydeliggjøres. Dernest gir kunnskap om hvor motivene stammer fra enda et lag mening på de to forrige. Til tross for det ofte abstrakte uttrykket så er det her snakk om ganske så virkelighetstro og dokumentariske bilder, og det er ofte gjennom titlene at nøkkelen til denne kunnskapen kommer til oss. Gjennom denne forskyvingen fra det abstrakte til det representerende oppstår Entians forvirringstaktikk, der betrakteren blir kastet mellom bildets abstraksjon og dets konkrete opphav.

Kunstneren og det landskapet han maler er nesten på motsatt side av jorden. Dersom vi fortsatt hadde vært visuelt uskyldige ville det vært nærmest umulig å forstå at man fra innsiden av et atelier kan følge været på andre siden av jorda. Men for dagens uskyldsfrie blikk er dette en del av hverdagen. Den engelske maleren John Constable (1776-1837) derimot var utendørs og i tett kontakt med elementene da han registrerte skyers formasjoner og lysets fall, med tidspunkt og vindretning markert på baksiden av sine små malerier: "31 Sepr 10-11 o'clock morning looking Eastward a gentle wind to East." Observasjoner av skyer gjorde han ganske sikker oppmerksom på hvor store konsekvenser vindretningen kunne ha for været. På samme måte vet forskerne i Antarktis at små temperaturendringer i havet under isbremmen styrer havstrømmene i verden.

Det er som om små endringer har større, eller hvert fall mer uante, konsekvenser i dag enn før. Dersom webkameraet på Neumeyer blir defekt vil en kunstner i sitt atelier på motsatt side av planeten bli rykket ut av vanen, ut av strømmen bilder med to eller ett plan. Plutselig skifter bildet, og den oppmerksomme kikker får kanskje se innsiden av en forskningsstasjon og noe vi bare kan anta er forskere som inntar sin morgenkaffe rundt klokken ni en tilfeldig morgen. Plutselig blir hverdagen sensasjonell, men bruddet i bildestrømmen er midlertidig, og snart er kameraet tilbake på sin vante utkikkspost. Trofast som bare et mekanisk eller digitalt verktøy kan være. Det betyr at idet kameraet blir defekt er det også trofast defekt, noe som antagelig ga Entian sitt repertoar for verket Looking for Painting – Following the webcam at the Neumayer Station, Antarctica daily from June 1st to August 10th in Painting. Selv om det her er snakk om et tidsrom som kanskje viser et avvik, så er det ikke oppsiktsvekkende i sammenhengen på noen måte slik kaffepausen til forskerne var, og han benytter seg dermed ikke av den logikken som så ofte driver bildevirkeligheten omkring oss: den sensasjonsdrevne.

I denne serien malerier, som vises som en monumental vegginstallasjon, ser vi et repetert fragment av en vinduskarm med fokus så nærsynt at det er vanskelig å vite hva som foregår utenfor. Kunnskapen om bildeteknologien og hvordan denne påvirkes av lysforhold er det eneste som kan anvendes om man ønsker at akkurat disse maleriene skal være dokumentasjon av en løpende tid og ikke resultatet av et defekt kamera. Resonnementet blir da at utsnittet og tonene er det samme i alle bildene fordi man kan anta at lyset inne på forskningsstasjonen gjør at kameraet ikke klarer å fange opp endringer i lyset på utsiden, og dermed dokumenterer tiden som går. Vi må jo huske på at den nordlige sommeren er den sørlige vinteren… På den annen side må vi nok trekke bildene i tvil. Dette vedvarende bildet er sannsynligvis en digital løgn, eller noe som ligner en digital drøm. Denne delen av prosjektet Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) viser oss grensesnittet mellom dokumentasjon og abstraksjon på en helt konkret måte. Gjennom å repetere arkiveringen av det samme bildet gjennom hele perioden, identifiserer kunstneren seg med det digitale verktøyet han benytter seg av som del av sin researchmetode. Gjennom å bruke ikke-sensasjonelle virkemidler insisterer han gjennom dette prosjektet på at vi også må rette oppmerksomheten mot hvordan verden fanges i bildeverden, ikke bare på hva som fanges i denne modellen som er Entians univers.

La oss fortsette med å ta utgangspunkt i hva dette lille utsnittet av verden peker på, annet enn forskningsutstyr. Dette utsnittet er, i Entians versjoner, mer enn en estetisk undersøkelse. Det vi her har med å gjøre er et tidligere ”tomt” landskap som ikke har hatt annen funksjon i vår hverdagslige tankeverden enn som et punkt der verden møter seg selv, der vest kan bli øst eller morgen kan bli kveld, på mange måter et ingenmannsland. Men som kjent er ingenmannsland også et land, og de senere år har polene blitt like ladet som nasjonalstaten. Det er kappløp i nord og en russisk miniubåt planter sitt flagg under isen, og til syd reiser Norges statsminister for første gang i 2008 for å markere nasjonale interesser. Norge har dermed interesser i begge polene: Under havbunnen i Arktis er det antatt store oljerikdommer, og i tillegg fører issmeltingen til at nye handelsruter til sjøs kan åpne seg i nord. Til tross for at det er vedtatt at man ikke kan benytte Antarktis til militær eller økonomisk vinning kan man på Sydpolen forske, og i dag er også kunnskap økonomi. Det ubeboelige er gjennom teknologisk nyvinning blitt mulig å dra nytte av på andre måter, og den geopolitiske spenningen er ikke lenger som et tykt belte i øst-vest-gående retning rundt jorden, men nå også som to pulserende hvite poler.

Kunsthistorien krever av kunsten at den er dechiffrerbar. Samtidens kunst kan dessverre ikke umiddelbart by på dette. Vi må benytte annen kunnskap enn den kunsthistorien bistår oss med for å undersøke dagens kunst. Istedenfor å se bakover eller framover, må vi se til siden for å kunne se kunsten i lys av det som er omkring den. Vi må gjennom for eksempel faktakunnskap skape lekkasjer mellom maleriene og vår egen verden. På samme måte som med bildet av gårdstunet viser Entian oss dermed gjennom Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) og den maleriske dokumentasjonen av fotografier av verden hvordan våre bilder er ladet av alt det som ligger utenfor rammen.

This text was commissioned by artist Patrik Entian on the occation of the completion of his three year fellowship with the Bergen National Academy of the Arts.

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

Polar Pulse

Through his painterly investigations Patrik Entian has for years explored the world through signs and maps, photography and media images. Though his imagery is simple in the same way as popular culture is seductive, we should still approach it by way of critical inquiry. Rather than represent the world, Entian re-represents it. It is not a case of verifying truth, but of applying a searching mind to one’s surroundings, including the world of images and the technology shaping this world. He has chosen to apply a methodically painterly activity in his long-term project, exploring the way we register, and thereby also represent, the world about us through different technological methods.

In an age when we think everything has already been discovered and mapped out, we find it hard to believe that anything new is still to be discovered. This opens up possibilities, ways of looking at what already is there. This is where Entian has found his field of interest, as he dwells on pictures that most of us would pass by and forget.

One of Entian’s most controversial paintings is of a photograph of Orderud farm, displayed at the Department of Information, Science and Media Studies at the University of Bergen, as part of a major series of works for public spaces. Here we should remember that the “controversy” was manifested in a somewhat critical newspaper article prompted by a whiff of sensation. The matter may have been aired at a department meeting or two where employees discussed where to hang the painting, so as not to cause offence to anyone. The photograph, and hence the painting, depicts the farmhouse, the yard and the pensioner’s cottage where three family members were shot dead at Pentecost in 1999. Thus the inspiration for the painting was an ordinary photograph of a farm with historical roots as deep as those of aviation history. Traditionally, Norwegians have their farm photographed from the air, as a way of documenting the hard work that has gone into creating a home and a work place for oneself and one’s family. The picture which is Entian’s point of departure might just as well have been enlarged, framed and hung over a sofa or in a den. A university institute where complex structures of our (mediated) world are examined on a daily basis, actually felt challenged by the painting of a landscape. Unlike the photograph, the painting did not document a farm where people had been murdered, where morality had been shaken. Rather, the painting was an indirect documentation of the media coverage and analysis of the immoral acts, thereby raising questions of journalism ethics. Entian’s painting, Orderud gård, juxtaposes morality and immorality, traditional praise for farming, farmers and the work of the individual was set beside a triple murder.

If we construct a model consisting exclusively of images of the world, with Entian’s paintings exploring this model, we find that he is consistently operating at a meta-level. His visual interests are concerned with representation, and the world that he examines is the already mediated reality. In order to explore this representation, Entian’s tools of choice are the Internet and volume, and he employs the titles of his works as clues so that everyone should realise that he is exploring representations of the world through rerepresentation. Quite unsentimentally, we are invited into his model of the world, the titles of his works revealing how he connects, quietly and precisely, with major trends in society, like a spaceship bringing supplies to the International Space Station. All the while working in his studio.

You could say Patrik Entian’s studio resembles a space station. Here he can observe the world at a safe distance. Here he investigates what this observation actually is, he explores what knowledge about the picture provides us with, as well as how this can be turned into new images and new knowledge. What he shows us, is what he has seen. He has not experienced the things he displays, but he has definitely seen them, and he presents us with an experience of what he has seen.

They say that the English painter J. M.W. Turner (1775-1851) had himself tied to the mast of a ship so that he could see what a tempest was like. What he really did was experience an actual storm. This experience goes far beyond the purely perceptual. It was physical in a way that is more comprehensive and incredible than anything those of us who have not been tied to the mast of a ship during a storm can fathom by looking at Turner’s paintings. In other words, Entian’s project is quite different, as his relationship to his source material is purely perceptual. He observes and performs a close reading of our everyday world of images. This perceptual experience is then moulded into new images. Even so, his Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) affords us a transformation that resembles Turner’s: As a product of new technologies, what is here described as “purely perceptual” in our day and age, is juxtaposed with, but not equal to, experience.

The difference between looking and experiencing is huge, but hard to discern. The task of the artist is to point out this difference, but also to infuse it with meaning. These are difficult perspectives that must be navigated, and as an individual one must find one’s focus, one’s area of interest. Entian’s interest is painting, as well as what painting can contribute to our visually chaotic world. You might say, that in our visual paradigm, where images have become just as important as text, and where popular culture takes precedence, art has lost out. The artist may be seen to have lost out. If so, this loss is temporary. While the producers of popular culture may polish visual strategies designed to make us believe in what is being communicated (and often put up for sale), the artist must always treat his own visual language with suspicion. As viewers, we must trust the artist’s eye, just as we must be sceptical of popular culture. In this way, the artist may initiate dispassionate debates by tapping into a tactic of confusion, avoiding polemics.
We are spoilt voyeurs these days. We have seen so much, and experienced almost as much. The way we experience images is akin to the way we experience the world. Images are no longer strangers, or instructive, or stirring, they just are. They are a part of the world. The image is part of our society, just as bureaucracy is a part of that same society, a kind of constant. Quietly present, all the time. And these days a large proportion of the images we see are digital. Digital images float around the world just like ideas do, caught by those who need them, and Entian is someone who needs images all the time.

Digital technology is an optimal tool for those who make archives available to the public, a public consisting of, among others, artists like Entian. Like someone searching through an archive, or going on a space mission, he surveys some of the images of the world. In recent years and through different projects, he has used his paintings to transfer a fleeting, digital visual world to the material world. Be it through repeating, almost mechanical exercises like Friends of Mu (2008). On 6 x 6 x 2 cm blocks of wood he painted the profile pictures of the circle of friends at the alternative art arena Sound of Mu from the social network underskog.no. Or like his series of diary paintings from 2012 where he converted the MMS’es from friends and his own mobile phone photographs to the A4 format, forcing himself to paint using fast strokes, not with a brush, but with a palette knife.

Having started near to home, with pictures from his own social sphere, he has made the leap into the world with Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image). Like an astronaut, Entian has set off on a journey that has taken him far afield. He has repeatedly gone off to Antarctica, but the pictures he has brought back are mere fragments of a reality that others have decided for him. It would be a mistake to think that the fragment can reflect the whole. This is a long-term case of harvesting webcam images that are updated every tenth minute and transferred to a silent crowd over the Internet.

The American author Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) reportedly said that it is hard to understand how Picasso could paint the way he did, not even having sat in an aeroplane. Entian’s paintings remind us that our vision changes as technologies change, and thanks to the over-mediated world we inhabit, we also have access to new ways of seeing as we make use of everyday methods, such as the Internet. Thus it is not hard to understand how Entian can paint landscapes of Antarctica without going there.

In recent years Entian has downloaded and collected images from the German research station Neumayer in Antarctica, at the Ekström Ice Shelf on the coast of Queen Maud Land, to be precise. All his source materials for the project Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) stem from a single camera, the one belonging to PALAOA – Perennial Acoustic Observatory in the Antarctic Ocean – located in the observatory mast. The camera is of a kind that listens to the sea, its function being to scan the frozen wasteland, making it possible for researchers to see if their equipment outside the station is intact.

The images resemble a diary in that they construct a detailed survey of a very small slice of the world on two planes – one horizontal, and one that appears to be vertical, i.e. the ice and the sky. As Entian uses these images as a point of departure for his paintings, we are often looking at two abstracted surfaces in one image. The weather and the daily rhythm makes the two planes of the images change colour and character, even turning into an entirely monochrome surface, as in Sunrise, sunset, sunrise, sunset. In addition to the painterly qualities of the project, we also observe something else: the re-representation which is the basis of the entire project. The paintings turn into abstractions, but also painterly documentations as the image is transferred from a digital to a material format, but what do they abstract and document, and why is it that turning these images into material ones is important to Entian? In the first place, the tempo is greatly reduced: both the time it takes to create it and the time it takes to look at the images. Secondly, the image is strengthened, the abstractions becoming more abstract. First through technology and then through the painterly, meaningful layers appear in Entian’s project as it is pointed out that our way of relating to the world is radically different from what it used to be; this becomes clear in the transmission, and thus in the representation and re-representation. Further, knowing where the motives are taken from lends another layer of meaning to the two previous ones. Despite the frequently abstract manifestation, we are here talking about rather realistic and documentary images; the key to this knowledge is often conveyed through the titles. Entian’s tactic of confusion arises through this shift from the abstract to the representational, as the viewer is tossed between the abstraction of the image and its actual origin.

The artist and the landscape he paints are located in almost diametrically opposite parts of the world. If we were still visual innocents, we would have found it well-nigh impossible to comprehend how you can observe the weather at the other end of the world from inside a studio. But for today’s eyes, so bereft of innocence, this is a feature of everyday life. The English painter John Constable (1776-1837), on the other hand, was out of doors, in close contact with the elements, as he registered cloud formations and the fall of the light, noting time and wind direction on the back of his small paintings: "31 Sepr 10-11 o'clock morning looking Eastward a gentle wind to East." His observations of the clouds must surely have made him realise the influence of wind directions on the weather. Similarly, the researchers in Antarctica know that minor changes in the temperature of the sea under the ice shelf govern the ocean currents of the world.

It seems as if minor changes have greater, or at least more undreamt-of, consequences nowadays than before. If the webcam at Neumeyer fails, an artist in a studio at the other side of the globe will be shaken out of his routine, out of the stream of images with two or one plane. Suddenly, the image changes, and the observant viewer may possibly see the inside of a research station and something we may surmise would be researchers having their morning coffee roundabout nine o’clock on a given morning. Suddenly, daily life turns sensational, but the stream of images has only been halted temporarily, the camera soon back at its customary observation point. As faithful as only a mechanical or digital tool can be. Which means that when the camera breaks down, it is also faithfully defective, which probably gave Entian the repertoire for his work Looking for Painting – Following the webcam at the Neumayer Station, Antarctica daily from June 1st to August 10th in Painting. Even if this period of time may throw up a discrepancy, in its context it is in no way sensational, not like the researchers’ coffee break was, and so he does not employ that logic which so often is the driving force behind the image-created reality which surrounds us: sensationalism.

In this series of paintings, presented as a monumental wall-mounted installation, we see a repeated fragment of a window sill with a focus so myopic that it is hard to tell what is happening outside. Knowledge of imaging technology and the way it is affected by lighting are the only means available if you want these particular paintings to be the documentation of the passing of time rather than of a defective camera. The line of reasoning, then, is that section and tone are the same in all the pictures as you may assume that the lighting inside the research station prevents the camera from picking up changes in the outside light, and hence, documents the passing of time. After all, we must remember that our northern summer means winter in the south... On the other hand, I am afraid we must question the images. This sustained image is in all likelihood a digital lie, or something approaching a digital dream. This part of the project Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) is a very tangible illustration of the interface between documentation and abstraction. By repeating the archiving of the same image throughout the whole period, the artist identifies with the digital tool which he employs as part of his research method. Using unsensational effects, he lets his project insist that we also direct our attention to the way the world is captured through the world of images, not just at what is caught in this model, which is Entian’s universe.

Let us continue taking as our point of departure what this little section of the world is an indication of, besides being a tool for research. In Entian’s versions, this section is more than en aesthetic exploration. What we are dealing with, is a previously “empty” landscape whose only function in our everyday world of thought has been that of being a point where the world meets up with itself, where west can turn into east or morning can turn into evening, in many ways a no-man's land. But as we know, a no-manse's land is also a land, and in recent years the poles have become just as highly charged as the nation-state. There is a race on in the north, with a Russian minisub planting its flag under the ice, and the Norwegian prime minister travelling south for the first time in order to register national interests. So Norway has interests at both poles: Huge riches of oil are presumed to exist under the Arctic Sea, and the melting of the ice in the north may lead to the opening of new trade routes at sea. In spite of agreements that Antarctica is not to be used for military or commercial gain, research may be carried out at the South Pole, and these days, knowledge is also business. Through technological advances, it has become possible to tap into the uninhabitable in other ways, and geopolitical tension is no longer like a hefty east-west belt stretching round the world, but also like two pulsating, white poles.

Art history demands that art be decipherable. Contemporary art can not instantly comply with this. We must use other kinds of knowledge than that provided by art history when examining today’s art. Rather than look to the past or to the future, we must look sideways, to see art in light of what surrounds it. For instance, by making use of factual knowledge we may create leaks between paintings and our own world. And so, just as in the picture of the farmyard, through Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) and the painterly documentation of photographs of the world, Entian shows us how our images are pregnant with everything that exists outside the frame.

Translated from the Norwegian by Egil Fredheim.

---------

Polpuls

Patrik Entian har i mange år gjennom sin maleriske utforsking forholdt seg indirekte til verden, gjennom tegn og kart, fotografi og mediebilder. Selv om hans billedspråk er enkelt, på samme måte som populærkultur er forførende, skal vi allikevel stille kritiske spørsmål i møte med den. Istedenfor å representere så re-representerer Entian vår verden. Det er ikke snakk om å være sannhetsvitne, men å ha et granskende blikk på verden omkring seg, inkludert bildeverden og den teknologien som skaper denne verden. I sitt langvarige prosjekt har han bestemt seg for, gjennom en metodisk malerisk aktivitet, å undersøke hvordan vi gjennom ulike teknologiske metoder registrerer, og dermed representerer, verden omkring oss.

I en tid da vi mener at alt er oppdaget og kartlagt er det vanskelig å tro at vi kan oppdage noe nytt. Dette åpner nye muligheter for å se på det vi allerede har tilgjengelig. Det er i denne sammenhengen at Entian har funnet sin interesse når han dveler ved bilder som vanligvis ville blitt forbigått og glemt.

Et av Entians mest kontroversielle malerier er fra et foto av Orderud gård som ble hengt opp på Institutt for informasjons- og medievitenskap på Universitetet i Bergen i 2006 som del av en større serie verk for offentlige rom. I denne sammenhengen må vi huske at det ”kontroversielle” manifesterte seg i en sensasjonsdrevet, og forsiktig kritisk, avisartikkel. Kanskje ble saken tatt opp på et instituttmøte, eller to, der de ansatte diskuterte hvor maleriet burde henge for ikke å støte noen. Fotoet, og dermed maleriet, viser gårdstunet med våningshuset og kårstuen der tre familiemedlemmer ble funnet skutt i pinsen 1999. Utgangspunktet for maleriet er dermed et ordinært fotografi av en gård, med historiske røtter like langt tilbake som flyhistorien. I Norge har vært vanlig å avfotografere gården sin fra luften, som et oversiktsdokument over det harde arbeidet man har lagt ned i å skape et hjem og en arbeidsplass for seg og sine. Bildet som er utgangspunktet til Entian kunne like gjerne blitt forstørret, rammet inn i glass og ramme, for deretter å bli hengt opp over en sofa eller i en kjellerstue. En universitetsavdeling som til daglig undersøker komplekse strukturer i vår (medierte) verden viste seg faktisk utfordret av et landskapsmaleri. Maleriet dokumenterte ikke, slik fotografiet hadde gjort, en gård der det var begått drap, der moralen hadde fått en knekk. Maleriet dokumenterte derimot indirekte mediene som omtalte og analyserte de umoralske handlingene, og stilte dermed spørsmål om presseetikk. Entians maleri Orderud gård sidestiller det moralske og det umoralske, den tradisjonsrike hyllesten av jordbruket, bonden og det egne arbeidet ble sidestilt med et trippeldrap.

Hvis vi lager en modell som utelukkende består av avbildninger av verden, og Entians malerier undersøker denne modellen, ser vi at han hele tiden opererer på et metanivå. Den verden han behandler er den allerede mediert virkeligheten, og hans visuelle interesser er representasjon. For å kunne undersøke dette bruker han internett og mengde som verktøy, og for at alle skal bli oppmerksomme på at Entian undersøker representasjoner av verden gjennom re-representasjon benytter han verkstitlene som ledetråder. Usentimentalt blir vi invitert inn i hans modell av verden, og gjennom titlene kan vi se at verkene hans også kobler seg stille og presist på større samfunnsstrømninger lik et romskip med forsyninger til Den internasjonale romstasjonen. Og hele tiden jobber han i sitt atelier.

Man kan si at Patrik Entians atelier ligner en romstasjon. Herfra kan han observere verden på trygg avstand. Her undersøker han hva denne observasjonen faktisk er, han undersøker hva kunnskap om bildet gir oss, og hvordan dette kan formes om til nye bilder og ny kunnskap. Det han viser oss er det han har sett. Han har ikke erfart det han viser, men han har absolutt sett det, og det han gir oss er en erfaring av det han har sett.

Det sies at den engelske maleren J. M.W. Turner (1775-1851) lot seg binde fast i en skipsmast for å kunne se hvordan en storm så ut. Det han egentlig gjorde var å erfare stormen i et direkte forhold. Denne erfaringen strekker seg langt ut over den rent perseptuelle. Det var fysisk på en mer omfattende og ufattelig måte enn vi som ikke har vært bundet fast i en skipsmast under storm kan forstå ved å se Turners malerier. Det er med andre ord et helt annet prosjekt Entian har fore, da hans forhold til sitt grunnmateriale utelukkende er perseptuelt. Han iakttar og nærleser vår hverdagslige billedverden. Den perseptuelle erfaringen bearbeides deretter til nye bilder. Allikevel gir hans Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) oss en lignende bearbeiding som den Turner foretok: Som et resultat av nye teknologier er det som her beskrives som ”rent perseptuelt” i vår tid sidestilt, men ikke likestilt, med erfaring.

Det er stor forskjell mellom det å se og det å erfare, som er vanskelig å få øye på. Kunstnerens oppgave er å påvise denne forskjellen, men også gi den mening. Det er vanskelige posisjoner som må navigeres, og man må som enkeltperson finne sitt fokus, sin interesse. Entians interesse er maleriet, og hva dette kan bidra med i dagens visuelt kaotiske verden. I vårt visuelle paradigme, der bildet har fått like stor betydning som tekst og populærkulturen har forrang, kan man påstå at kunsten har tapt. Kunstneren kan sies å ha tapt. Dette er i så fall et forbigående tap. For mens de som produserer populærkulturen kan finpusse visuelle strategier laget for at vi skal tro på det som kommuniseres (og ofte selges), må kunstneren hele tiden tvile på sitt eget visuelle språk. Vår oppgave som betraktere er å stole på kunstnerens blikk, på samme måte som vi må tvile på populærkulturen. Kunstneren kan på den måte starte saklige debatter, uten å polemisere, gjennom å benytte seg av en forvirringstaktikk.

Vi er bortskjemte kikkere i dag. Vi har sett så mye, og opplevd nesten like mye. Måten vi erfarer bilder er tilnærmet lik den måten vi erfarer verden på. Bildene er ikke lenger fremmede, eller instruktive, eller oppsiktsvekkende, de er bare der. De er en del av verden. På samme måte som byråkratiet er en del av vårt samfunn som en slags konstant, er bildet en del av det samme samfunnet. Stille til stede i alle tilfeller. Og de bildene vi ser i dag er i stor grad digitale. På samme måte som ideer flyter digitale bilder rundt i verden og fanges opp av de som trenger dem, og Entian er en som trenger bilder hele tiden.

Å benytte seg av digital teknologi fungerer optimalt for å gjøre arkiv tilgjengelig for offentligheten, som blant annet er befolket av kunstnere, slik som Entian. Lik en som leter i et arkiv eller drar på romferd kikker han seg gjennom noen av verdens bilder. Gjennom ulike prosjekter de siste årene har han med maleriene sine overført en digital og forgjengelig visuell verden til den materielle verden. Det være seg gjennom repeterende, og nesten mekaniske, øvelser slik som Friends of Mu (2008). På 6 x 6 x 2 cm store treklosser malte han profilbildene til vennekretsen til den alternative kunstarenaen Sound of Mu på det sosiale nettstedet underskog.no. Eller slik som i hans serie dagboksmalerier fra 2010 der han i A4-størrelse forstørret opp og malte venners MMS og sine egne mobiltelefonfotografier, og tvang seg selv til å male uten pensel, men i rask takt med en palettkniv.

Fra disse nære omgivelsene, bilder som tilhører hans egen sosiale sfære, har han med Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) tatt et sprang ut i verden. Som en astronaut har Entian lagt ut på en reise som har ført ham langt avgårde. Gjentatte ganger har han begitt seg til Antarktis, men bildene han har tatt med seg tilbake er bare bruddstykker av en virkelighet som andre har bestemt for ham. Det vil være en feiltagelse å tro at bruddstykket kan speile helheten. Det dreier seg her om en langsiktig innhøsting av webkamerabilder som oppdateres hvert tiende minutt, og sendes ut via internett til en taus masse.

Det er sagt at den amerikanske forfatteren Gertrude Stein (1874-1946) en gang har uttalt at det var vanskelig å forstå hvordan Picasso kunne male slik han gjorde, han som ikke en gang hadde vært i en flymaskin. Maleriene til Entian minner oss om at blikket endres når teknologien endres, og i og med den overmedierte verden vi lever i, har vi også tilgang til nye måter å se på ved å bruke hverdagslige metoder, så som internett. Det er dermed ikke lenger vanskelig å forstå hvordan Entian kan male landskapene i Antarktis uten å reise dit selv.

De siste årene har Entian lastet ned og samlet bilder fra den tyske forskningsstasjonen Neumayer i Antarktis, nærmere bestemt på Ekströmisen, en isbrem ved kysten av Dronning Maud Land. Alt hans materiale til prosjektet Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) kommer fra ett eneste kamera, det som tilhører PALAOA - PerenniAL Acoustic Observatory in the Antarctic Ocean og er plassert i masten til observatoriet. Kameraet tilhører de som hører på havet, og dets funksjon er å se utover isødet for at forskerne skal kunne se om forskningsutstyret deres utenfor stasjonen er intakt.

Lik en dagbok skaper bildene en detaljert oversikt over et veldig lite utsnitt av verden som inneholder to plan; et horisontalt og et tilsynelatende vertikalt, altså isen og himmelen. Når Entian skaper malerier med disse bildene som utgangspunkt er det ofte to abstraherte flater i ett bilde vi ser på. Døgnets rytme og værforhold gjør at bildenes to plan endrer farge og karakter, og noen ganger til og med blir til én helt monokrom flate, slik vi ser i Sunrise, sunset, sunrise, sunset. I tillegg til de maleriske kvalitetene i prosjektet er det også noe annet vi ser på: re-representasjonen som er grunnlaget til hele prosjektet. Maleriene blir abstraksjoner, men også maleriske dokumentasjoner idet bildet overføres fra et digitalt til et materielt format, men hva er det de abstraherer og dokumenterer, og hvorfor er det viktig for Entian å gjøre disse bildene materielle? For det første senkes tempoet betraktelig: både den tiden det tar å lage og den tiden det tar å se bildene endres. For det andre så skjer en forsterking av bildet, abstraksjonene blir mer abstrakte. Først gjennom teknologien og deretter det maleriske oppstår meningsbærende lag i Entians prosjekt når det blir poengtert at vår måte å forholde oss til verden er radikalt annerledes enn tidligere, og det er i overføringen og dermed representasjonen og re-representasjonen at dette tydeliggjøres. Dernest gir kunnskap om hvor motivene stammer fra enda et lag mening på de to forrige. Til tross for det ofte abstrakte uttrykket så er det her snakk om ganske så virkelighetstro og dokumentariske bilder, og det er ofte gjennom titlene at nøkkelen til denne kunnskapen kommer til oss. Gjennom denne forskyvingen fra det abstrakte til det representerende oppstår Entians forvirringstaktikk, der betrakteren blir kastet mellom bildets abstraksjon og dets konkrete opphav.

Kunstneren og det landskapet han maler er nesten på motsatt side av jorden. Dersom vi fortsatt hadde vært visuelt uskyldige ville det vært nærmest umulig å forstå at man fra innsiden av et atelier kan følge været på andre siden av jorda. Men for dagens uskyldsfrie blikk er dette en del av hverdagen. Den engelske maleren John Constable (1776-1837) derimot var utendørs og i tett kontakt med elementene da han registrerte skyers formasjoner og lysets fall, med tidspunkt og vindretning markert på baksiden av sine små malerier: "31 Sepr 10-11 o'clock morning looking Eastward a gentle wind to East." Observasjoner av skyer gjorde han ganske sikker oppmerksom på hvor store konsekvenser vindretningen kunne ha for været. På samme måte vet forskerne i Antarktis at små temperaturendringer i havet under isbremmen styrer havstrømmene i verden.

Det er som om små endringer har større, eller hvert fall mer uante, konsekvenser i dag enn før. Dersom webkameraet på Neumeyer blir defekt vil en kunstner i sitt atelier på motsatt side av planeten bli rykket ut av vanen, ut av strømmen bilder med to eller ett plan. Plutselig skifter bildet, og den oppmerksomme kikker får kanskje se innsiden av en forskningsstasjon og noe vi bare kan anta er forskere som inntar sin morgenkaffe rundt klokken ni en tilfeldig morgen. Plutselig blir hverdagen sensasjonell, men bruddet i bildestrømmen er midlertidig, og snart er kameraet tilbake på sin vante utkikkspost. Trofast som bare et mekanisk eller digitalt verktøy kan være. Det betyr at idet kameraet blir defekt er det også trofast defekt, noe som antagelig ga Entian sitt repertoar for verket Looking for Painting – Following the webcam at the Neumayer Station, Antarctica daily from June 1st to August 10th in Painting. Selv om det her er snakk om et tidsrom som kanskje viser et avvik, så er det ikke oppsiktsvekkende i sammenhengen på noen måte slik kaffepausen til forskerne var, og han benytter seg dermed ikke av den logikken som så ofte driver bildevirkeligheten omkring oss: den sensasjonsdrevne.

I denne serien malerier, som vises som en monumental vegginstallasjon, ser vi et repetert fragment av en vinduskarm med fokus så nærsynt at det er vanskelig å vite hva som foregår utenfor. Kunnskapen om bildeteknologien og hvordan denne påvirkes av lysforhold er det eneste som kan anvendes om man ønsker at akkurat disse maleriene skal være dokumentasjon av en løpende tid og ikke resultatet av et defekt kamera. Resonnementet blir da at utsnittet og tonene er det samme i alle bildene fordi man kan anta at lyset inne på forskningsstasjonen gjør at kameraet ikke klarer å fange opp endringer i lyset på utsiden, og dermed dokumenterer tiden som går. Vi må jo huske på at den nordlige sommeren er den sørlige vinteren… På den annen side må vi nok trekke bildene i tvil. Dette vedvarende bildet er sannsynligvis en digital løgn, eller noe som ligner en digital drøm. Denne delen av prosjektet Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) viser oss grensesnittet mellom dokumentasjon og abstraksjon på en helt konkret måte. Gjennom å repetere arkiveringen av det samme bildet gjennom hele perioden, identifiserer kunstneren seg med det digitale verktøyet han benytter seg av som del av sin researchmetode. Gjennom å bruke ikke-sensasjonelle virkemidler insisterer han gjennom dette prosjektet på at vi også må rette oppmerksomheten mot hvordan verden fanges i bildeverden, ikke bare på hva som fanges i denne modellen som er Entians univers.

La oss fortsette med å ta utgangspunkt i hva dette lille utsnittet av verden peker på, annet enn forskningsutstyr. Dette utsnittet er, i Entians versjoner, mer enn en estetisk undersøkelse. Det vi her har med å gjøre er et tidligere ”tomt” landskap som ikke har hatt annen funksjon i vår hverdagslige tankeverden enn som et punkt der verden møter seg selv, der vest kan bli øst eller morgen kan bli kveld, på mange måter et ingenmannsland. Men som kjent er ingenmannsland også et land, og de senere år har polene blitt like ladet som nasjonalstaten. Det er kappløp i nord og en russisk miniubåt planter sitt flagg under isen, og til syd reiser Norges statsminister for første gang i 2008 for å markere nasjonale interesser. Norge har dermed interesser i begge polene: Under havbunnen i Arktis er det antatt store oljerikdommer, og i tillegg fører issmeltingen til at nye handelsruter til sjøs kan åpne seg i nord. Til tross for at det er vedtatt at man ikke kan benytte Antarktis til militær eller økonomisk vinning kan man på Sydpolen forske, og i dag er også kunnskap økonomi. Det ubeboelige er gjennom teknologisk nyvinning blitt mulig å dra nytte av på andre måter, og den geopolitiske spenningen er ikke lenger som et tykt belte i øst-vest-gående retning rundt jorden, men nå også som to pulserende hvite poler.

Kunsthistorien krever av kunsten at den er dechiffrerbar. Samtidens kunst kan dessverre ikke umiddelbart by på dette. Vi må benytte annen kunnskap enn den kunsthistorien bistår oss med for å undersøke dagens kunst. Istedenfor å se bakover eller framover, må vi se til siden for å kunne se kunsten i lys av det som er omkring den. Vi må gjennom for eksempel faktakunnskap skape lekkasjer mellom maleriene og vår egen verden. På samme måte som med bildet av gårdstunet viser Entian oss dermed gjennom Looking for Painting (Collecting Evidence – Verifying the Image) og den maleriske dokumentasjonen av fotografier av verden hvordan våre bilder er ladet av alt det som ligger utenfor rammen.