Opus citatum – the work in question was written as a result of an invitation to write on curating in Norway, by the two editors of the book Kurator? (Curator?); Tanja Thorjussen og Thale Fastvold, published 2009.

I would like to extend my gratitude to Linus Elmes, Abdellah Karroum and Matt Packer for their valuable contribution to this text and for ongoing discussions.

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

Opus citatum [1] – the work in question

I was reading a ten year old interview by Stephan Dillemuth yesterday. He interviewed Jonas Ekeberg [2] who tried to define what is between the local and the global [3]. His answer in the late 90s was not as one might expect the national, but the urban. So, looking back at that and realising that Norway still, ten years on, don’t have many truly urban centres, as in diverse, all-embracing, hybrid, troubling and lively centres, I guess the Norwegian artist or curator always and forever will feel trapped between the local and the global without finding rest.

The popular romantic myth of a curator is that of the auteur roaming the international art scene without an anchor or maybe even without a port. But the truth of the matter is that even the most independent of curators do belong somewhere. It is actually not even interesting to escape, and the opposite of escaping is to seek out. As a curator a big part of the practice is to seek out and negotiate collaborations. In those negotiations we don’t passively study the field of art, but we take very active part at the same time as we are obliged to try to understand the range and effect of our curating and the curatorial.

Since before the text I read was written, and of course also after, there has been inflation in what I like to call geography exhibitions. Numerous exhibitions have tried to suss out what is “American” or “Eastern European” or “African” or ”Indian”, through looking at contemporary art from these geographies. It is, after all, simple to understand the world merely as a map, as pure geography. Sometimes these exhibitions are made by local curators from the context the exhibition is supposed to talk about [4]. In gloomy and pessimistic moments I ask: is it for financial reasons these exhibitions are commissioned by institutions and accepted by curators? Or is it in the interest of self promotion? In the more positive and optimistic moments I hope: it is because the curator has an undying interest in their immediate surroundings, and a wish to put these surroundings into a broader context.

One approach to this situation of being captured, or an approach to the question if one is indeed captured, came to me this summer [5] one day in a place far away from home, on a different continent even. The next day, sitting in a car driving from an airport to a city on yet another continent, these thoughts came to be handy as I was asked ”Are you an international curator?”. Apart from being surprised by the bluntness of the question, my immediate reaction was to refer to the previous day’s notes: “How to be a non-national curator?” I had jotted down this in my note book: Nasjonal – Internasjonal – Ikkenasjonal. National – International – Non-national. It both sounds and looks good in Norwegian. The idea of non-nationalism indicates escape and flight, but it is at the same time part of a strategy of taking responsibility for a situation that is still with us and was so well described ten years ago: how to avoid being overtaken by the idea of the national? This national agenda can be served to us by a diverse array of structures, be it within the art world or outside of the art world. And the work ahead of us is to not make exhibitions with art and artists because they are from a specific country or region. The term non-national, on the other hand, also indicates expulsion and unwantedness. Nonetheless the curator’s responsibility cannot be addressed in the singular which is non-nationalism, it needs to be looked at in plural; responsibilities, and there are many of them. Two of these responsibilities are insisting on keeping one’s perspective, while at the same time escaping the instrumentality of having an agenda. Because we are free to be partial even when creating and taking part in a cosmopolitan society.

To try to distinguish between having a perspective from having an agenda I have performed a collective activity with colleagues. Thinking about the issues at hand it is interesting to see if and how we are voluntarily or involuntarily captured by the idea of ‘origin’. The context of this text is described by the editors to be curating in Norway. And as we know; just by opening your mouth speaking your mother tongue in this country you are immediately at least regionalised. The follow up question in this culture is more often than not: “where do you come from?” sometimes even with the added “- really?”

I have in different ways discussed issues relating to origin with three colleagues I have been working with during 2008, and as I was asked to write this text I decided to e-mail them the same set of questions, written from my perspective, to see what responses I would get. Linus Elmes is an artist turned curator, turned gallerist, returned artist-curator living in Stockholm, Sweden; Abdellah Karroum is an art researcher and independent curator running several self organised initiatives in Rabat and Fès, Morocco; and Matt Packer is an English curator working in an art and research institution in Cork, Ireland. Below are three diverse, but not necessarily different, approaches to ideas relating to origin and curating.

ASK: What is your first memory of curating, and in what situation was this?

LE: I actually used that very first memory once in a text to exemplify my relation towards curating as an organisation of information more than a physical and logistic experience. The story took place when I was seven years old. My parents just bought a new house and I had no friends in this new village. I decided to make an invitation for a garden party. I used my felt tipped pens to write invitation cards in my room and then I distributed them to all the neighbours. My parents did not know about this operation and was more than surprised when people started to show up dressed for a garden party. But, it took me 25 years to understand that it was curating and not just devilment …

AK: A performance by a monkey, curated by an anonymous man in a weekly public market, the Wednesday Souk in Bentaib, the nearest village from the place where I was born in north Morocco.

MP: I don’t really have a first memory of curating.
When I was about 8 years old, I organised an exhibition in the front room of the house that my parents were renting at the time. I can’t remember the exhibition or what was included, but I do remember developing a stringent security system that involved snooker balls.
I first began thinking about curating through my interest in artists’ books and publications. There have been many parallels drawn between editorial and curatorial practice, and I took these parallels quite seriously when I started on the curatorial programme at Goldsmiths College. I was thinking that I might emerge from the course with a set of interrogative, collaborative publication projects under my arm, which in the end – for whatever reason - didn’t happen.

ASK: What is the most important 'ingredient' for you to start a project? What makes you create?

LE: I am triggered by collaborations and context mostly. Is that an answer?

AK: A good meeting, followed by permanent research and dialogue.

MP: There are no ingredients apart from initial curiosity, and how it develops from there depends on whether I’m working to an institutional mandate. Perhaps the sensible answer to the question is ‘artists’. In my own case, however, there are curatorial projects that involve artistic positions more than they involve artists per se. Secondly, I don’t think ‘artists’ should be thought of as ingredients.

ASK: What in your opinion creates the most resistance in your projects?

LE: I think generally that every project I ever did in the framework of an institution had more friction and resistance than every project initiated outside the institutions, in this case I am also referring to the imaginary ones, those never materialized. (See also next paragraph.)

AK: Creating the space for each project and the translation of the art works to a larger space than the one created.

MP: If I understand the question correctly, the 1st answer is: money. 2nd answer: the various demands of effectiveness.

ASK: Is it possible to describe your curatorial practice: do you have a specific interest? Do you have a specific method? What are you depending on to be able to continue to create?

LE: I am interested in the way institutional structures are manifested and the mechanisms that constitute the institution, the rituals, the language, the uniforms, the codes and all that. My method simply described would be to organize the content and the information in a way that make it transparent by reviling the para-text.

AK: hmmm. If you can describe the art work you can describe the curatorial practice. But if you can not see the art work you can also describe it. It is like in politics. The curator is working to show something existing happened, but not necessarily something produced. I am really interested in art as an activity, and I wish the artists could be acting with the work more than consuming. I am not interested in works that consume more material than they produce of sense or action to change the world. I think dialogue is very important for a curator to continue to create. But sometime dreaming is also a good way, especially when we disagree with our societies.

MP: The work I do in an institutional capacity is different from my independent projects. Without over-generalising, I tend to think this is a necessary and important separation, especially when independent projects are highly-individuated and even characterised; that’s not what public institutions should be promoting.
I have a specific interest in narrative spaces, acts of distribution and the rhetorical export of rock n’ roll. I haven’t signed a lifetime contract as a curator, so I’m not anxious about sustaining these interests under the rubric of curating.

ASK: How does your personal interest/investment in curating affect the institution/structure that you work with, and how does this institution/structure affect your curating?

LE: As you understand from the answer in the last paragraph this is what it is all about, the relation between the self and the assignment. I think revolting is productive and fun…

AK: Very interesting! Very affective, also because I created my actual institution/structure which is, seen from outside, much more independently active from me. My way of curating change spaces unto places and these places affect my curating after I leave for the next expedition... One important problematic is to work both on research and activity, with observation and action. Both positions could be instrumentalised by a structure, or by an institution. In the situation in which we can not be autonomous, the relationship to the institution should be ethically balanced. That means that a curator should be able to create in an interesting artistic sphere, more than take part in developing cultural-touristic productions. So the resistance to the production opportunity needs a real energy and the desire to create a creative space.

MP: I’ve outlined this in the previous answer.

..........
[1] Op. cit. (Latin, short for "opus citatum"/"opera citata", meaning "the work cited/from the cited work") is the term used to provide an endnote or footnote citation to refer the reader to an earlier citation. To find the Op. cit. source, one has to look at the previous footnotes or general references section to find the relevant author.
[2] Ekeberg is trained as a photographer, then turned editor and curator and currently the director of the photography museum Preus museum. Since writing this text Ekeberg has been appointed the new editor of Kunstkritikk.no
[3] Jonas Ekeberg: “I think that between localism and globalism there is urbanism. This is very important to remember: the idea of the city is an interesting way to negotiate this discourse. The city is a place where international, global capitalism has to meet local discourse, where it could be possible to interact and to face real issues.”
http://www.societyofcontrol.com/research/ekeberg.htm
[4] Often they have been commissioned by the likes of museums, art centres etc. Some of these exhibitions are also curated by an “alien” curator, not originally from the geography in question.
[5] 2008

..........
..........
..........

Opus citatum [1] – arbeidet det her er snakk om

I går leste jeg en ti år gammel tekst av Stephan Dillemuth. Han intervjuet Jonas Ekeberg [2] som forsøkte å definere hva som befinner seg mellom det lokale og det globale [3]. Hans svar, sent på nittitallet, var ikke som man kan forvente det nasjonale, men det urbane. Det finnes ikke flere virkelig urbane sentre i Norge nå, som i mangfoldige, altomsluttende, hybride, urolige og livlige sentre, enn det gjorde for ti år siden, og en kan bare anta at den norske kunstneren og kuratoren for alltid vil være fanget mellom dette lokale og globale uten å finne hvile.

Den populære myten er den om kuratoren som den kreative autor som flakker rundt i den internasjonale kunstverdenenen uten anker, og kanskje til og med uten havn. Men sannheten er at selv den mest uavhengige kurator faktisk hører til et sted. Det er ikke en gang interessant å flykte, og det motsatte av å flykte er å oppsøke. Som kurator er dette nettopp en stor del av praksisen, å oppsøke og forhandle samarbeid. I disse forhandlingene er vi ikke passive observatører av et kunstfelt, men veldig aktivt deltagende samtidig som vi er forpliktet til å prøve å forstå rekkevidden av vår egen kuratering og av det kuratoriske.

Siden før den teksten jeg leste ble skrevet, og selvsagt siden, har det vært en inflasjon i det jeg liker å kalle geografiutstillinger. Flerfoldige utstillinger har forsøkt å finne ut av hva som er ”amerikansk” eller ”østeuropeisk” eller ”afrikansk” eller ”indisk”, gjennom å se på samtidskunst fra disse geografiene. Det er, tross alt, enkelt å forstå verden som et kart, som ren geografi. Noen ganger er disse utstillingene også laget av kuratorer som kommer fra den gitte konteksten. I dystre og pessimistiske øyeblikk spør jeg meg om: det er økonomiske hensyn som gjør at institusjoner bestiller slike utstillinger, og at kuratorer aksepterer tilbudet? Eller er det for å fremme seg selv og sitt? I mer positive og optimistiske øyeblikk håper jeg: at det er fordi kuratoren har en levende interesse for sine umiddelbare omgivelser, og et ønske om å plassere dem inn i en større sammenheng.

En mulig måte å nærme seg denne innestengte situasjonen på, eller rettere en måte å nærme seg spørsmålet om dette er en innestengt situasjon, kom til meg en dag i sommer [4] et sted langt hjemmefra, faktisk på et annet kontinent. Og det viste seg at denne tanken kom godt med da jeg dagen etter, på enda et annet kontinent, ble spurt om jeg ”var en internasjonal kurator?” Bortsett fra umiddelbart å bli forfjamset over spørsmålet, refererte jeg tilbake til det jeg hadde skriblet ned i notatboken: ”Hvordan være ikkenasjonal kurator?”, videre var skribleriene Nasjonal – Internasjonal – Ikkenasjonal. Det både ser og høres bra ut. Ideen om ikkenasjonalitet indikerer både rømning og flykt, men er samtidig en del av en metode for å ta ansvar for denne situasjonen som var så godt beskrevet for ti år siden: hvordan unngå å bli innhentet av ideen om det nasjonale? Denne nasjonale agendaen blir servert oss fra mange ulike hold, og kan like gjerne komme innenfra som utenfor kunstfeltet. Oppgaven foran oss er å ikke lage utstillinger med kunst og kunstnere fordi de kommer fra et spesifikt land eller region. På den annen side indikerer også ordet ikkenasjonal både utvisning og det å være uønsket. Likevel kan ikke ansvaret til en kurator omtales i dette entall, ikkenasjonal, det må ses på i flertall; ansvar, og det er mye av det. To ansvar er å insistere på å beholde sitte eget perspektiv, samtidig som man unngår det instrumentelle det er å ha en agenda. For vi er fri til å velge side, selv mens man skaper og tar del i et kosmopolittisk samfunn.

For å prøve å skille mellom det å ha et perspektiv i motsetning til det å ha en agenda har jeg utført en kollektiv aktivitet med kolleger. Når man tenker på disse spørsmålsstillingene er det spennende å undersøke hvordan vi frivillig eller ufrivillig er låst av ideen om opphav. Denne tekstens sammenheng er nemlig beskrevet av redaktørene som en bok om kuratering i Norge. Og som vi alle vet, bare ved å åpne munnen i denne kulturen blir man i den minste regionalisert. Oppfølgingsspørsmålet er nesten alltid ”Hvor kommer du fra?”, gjerne med tillegget ”- egentlig?”

Jeg har i ulike sammenhenger diskutert tema relatert til opphav med tre kolleger jeg jobbet med i løpet av 2008, og da jeg ble spurt om å skrive denne teksten sendte jeg de alle likelydende spørsmål i e-post, forfattet fra mitt perspektiv, for å se hva slags respons jeg ville få. Linus Elmes er opprinnelig kunstner, deretter kurator og gallerist, og nå kunstner-kurator som bor i Stockholm, Sverige, Adbellah Karroum er kunstforsker og uavhengig kurator som driver flere selvorganiserte initiativ i Rabat og Fès, Marokko; og Matt Packer er engelsk kurator som for tiden er tilknyttet en kunst- og forskningsinstitusjon i Cork, Irland. Det følgende er tre mangfoldige, men ikke nødvendigvis ulike, holdninger til opprinnelse og kuratering.

ASK: Hva er ditt første minne av å kuratere, og i hvilken situasjon var det?

LE: Jeg har faktisk brukt dette første minnet en gang tidligere i en tekst for å eksemplifisere mitt forhold til det å kuratere, som mer er å organisere informasjon enn en fysisk og logistisk erfaring. Historien fant sted når jeg var syv år gammel. Mine foreldre hadde nettopp kjøpt et nytt hus, og jeg hadde ingen venner i det nye nabolaget. Jeg bestemte meg for å lage invitasjoner til en hagefest. Jeg satt på rommet mitt og tusjet invitasjoner som deretter ble distribuert til naboene. Foreldrene mine visste ikke noe om påfunnet, og var mer enn overrasket når folk kledd opp til hagefest kom. Men, det tok meg 25 år å forstå at dette var kuratering mer enn ondskapsfullt…

AK: En performance av en ape, kuratert av en anonym mann på et ukentlig offentlig marked, onsdags-souken i Bentaib, nabolandsbyen til det stedet jeg ble født i nordmarokko.

MP: Jeg har egentlig ikke noe første minne av kuratering.
Når jeg var rundt åtte år gammel organiserte jeg en utstilling i stuen i det huset mine foreldre på det tidspunktet leide. Jeg kan ikke huske utstillingen eller hva som var i den, men jeg husker godt at jeg utviklet et stringent sikkerhetssystem som blant annet besto av biljardkuler.
Jeg begynte å tenke på kuratering gjennom min interesse for bøker og publikasjoner laget av kunstnere. Det har vært trukket mange paralleller mellom redaktørens og kuratorens praksis, og jeg tok disse parallellene veldig alvorlig når jeg begynte på kuratorutdannelsen min på Goldsmiths College. Jeg tenkte at jeg skulle komme ut fra utdannelsen med et sett undersøkende samarbeidsprosjekter i bokform, som til slutt – uansett for hvilken grunn – ikke materialiserte seg.

ASK: Hva er den viktigste ingrediensen for at du skal sette i gang et prosjekt? Hva får deg til å skape?

LE: Jeg blir vekket av samarbeider og sammenhenger som oftest. Er det et svar?

AK: Et godt møte, med påfølgende varig undersøkelse og dialog.

MP: Det er ingen ingredienser bortsett fra innledende nysgjerrighet, og hvordan det utvikler seg derfra avhenger av om jeg jobber mot et institusjonelt mandat. Kanskje er en klok måte å svare på dette spørsmålet og si kunstnere. Imidlertid finnes det i mitt tilfelle også kuratoriske prosjekter som involverer kunstneriske posisjoner, mer enn kunstnere som sådan. På den annen side synes jeg ikke at kunstnere skal bli sett på som ingredienser.

ASK: Hva, i din mening, skaper mest motstand i dine prosjekter?

LE: Jeg tror generelt at hvert eneste prosjekt jeg har gjort innenfor rammene til en institusjon har hatt mer friksjon og motstand enn alle de prosjektene jeg har skapt utenfor. Her refererer jeg også til de fingerte, de som aldri materialiserte seg. (Se også neste avsnitt.)

AK: Det å skape åstedet for hvert prosjekt, for deretter å oversette kunstverket til en større sammenheng enn den som er blitt skapt.

MP: Hvis jeg forsår spørsmålet rett så er det første svaret: penger, deretter er det andre svaret: de ulike kravene til effektivitet.

ASK: Er det mulig å beskrive din kuratoriske praksis: har du en spesifikk interesse? Har du en spesifikk metode? Hva er du avhengig av for å være i stand til å fortsette å skape?

LE: Jeg er interessert i den måten institusjonelle strukturer manifesteres og de mekanismer en institusjon består av, ritualene, språket, uniformene, kodene og alt det der. Metoden min, enkelt forklart, er å organisere innholdet og informasjonen på en slik måte at dette blir transparent ved å undergrave para-teksten.

AK: hmmm. Hvis du kan beskrive kunstverket kan du beskrive den kuratoriske praksisen. Men dersom du ikke kan se kunstverket, kan du allikevel beskrive det. Det er som i politikken. Kuratoren arbeider med å vise at noe eksisterende hendte, men ikke nødvendigvis ble produsert. Jeg er virkelig interessert i kunst som aktivitet. Og jeg kunne ønske at kunstnerne kunne spille med verket mer enn å konsumere. Jeg er ikke interessert i verk som forbruker mer materiale enn de produserer av forstand eller handling for å forandre verden. Jeg mener dialog er veldig viktig for at en kurator skal kunne fortsette å skape. Men noen ganger er det å drømme også en god metode, spesielt når vi er uenige med samfunnet rundt oss.

MP: Arbeidet jeg gjør i en institusjonell stilling er veldig ulikt mine uavhengige prosjekter. Uten å trekke generelle slutninger så tror jeg at dette er en nødvendig og viktig oppdeling, særlig siden mine egne prosjekter er personlige og nesten karakteriserende, noe en offentlig institusjon ikke skal fremme.
Jeg har en spesiell interesse for narrative steder, distribusjonshandlinger og rock n’ rolls retorikkeksport. Jeg har ikke signert en livsvarig kontrakt som kurator, så jeg er ikke ivrig etter å beholde disse interessene i en egen kuratoravdeling.

ASK: Hvordan påvirker din personlige interesse/investering i kuratering de institusjonene/strukturene du jobber med, og hvordan påvirker disse institusjonene/strukturene din kuratering?

LE: Som du forstår fra forrige svar så er det dette det handler om, relasjonen mellom selvet og oppgaven. Jeg mener opprør kan være både produktivt og gøy…

AK: Veldig interessant! Veldig stor påvirkning, spesielt siden jeg skapte denne institusjonen/strukturen som, fra utsiden sett, er mye mer uavhengig aktiv enn meg. Min måte å kuratere på omskaper stedet til et åsted, og åstedet påvirker igjen min kuratering når jeg fortsetter til neste ekspedisjon… En viktig problemstilling er å jobbe med både undersøkelse og aktivitet samtidig, med både observasjon og handling. Begge disse posisjonene kan bli instrumentalisert av en struktur, eller en institusjon. I en situasjon der en ikke kan være autonom, bør forholdet til institusjonen være etisk balansert. Med det mener jeg at kuratoren skal være i stand til å skape i en interessant kunstnerisk sfære, mer enn å delta i å utvikle kulturelle turistproduksjoner. Det betyr at motstanden til produksjonsmuligheten trenger en ekte energi og et ønske om å skape dette kreative rommet.

MP: Jeg har svart på det i tidligere svar.

[1]Op cit (latinsk forkortelse for opus citatum, som betyr «det siterte verk») er et uttrykk som brukes i fotnoter for å henvise leseren til et tidligere referert verk. For å finne kilden som Op cit refererer til, må en se på tidligere fotnoter for å finne den aktuelle forfatteren.
[2] Ekeberg er utdannet fotokunstner, og har deretter blitt både redaktør og kurator, og er for tiden direktør på Preus Museum. Etter at denne teksten ble ferdigskrevet er han nyutnevnt redaktør av kunstkritikk.no.
[3] Jonas Ekeberg: “I think that between localism and globalism there is urbanism. This is very important to remember: the idea of the city is an interesting way to negotiate this discourse. The city is a place where international, global capitalism has to meet local discourse, where it could be possible to interact and to face real issues.”
http://www.societyofcontrol.com/research/ekeberg.htm
[4] 2008

Opus citatum – the work in question was written as a result of an invitation to write on curating in Norway, by the two editors of the book Kurator? (Curator?); Tanja Thorjussen og Thale Fastvold, published 2009.

I would like to extend my gratitude to Linus Elmes, Abdellah Karroum and Matt Packer for their valuable contribution to this text and for ongoing discussions.

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN

Opus citatum [1] – the work in question

I was reading a ten year old interview by Stephan Dillemuth yesterday. He interviewed Jonas Ekeberg [2] who tried to define what is between the local and the global [3]. His answer in the late 90s was not as one might expect the national, but the urban. So, looking back at that and realising that Norway still, ten years on, don’t have many truly urban centres, as in diverse, all-embracing, hybrid, troubling and lively centres, I guess the Norwegian artist or curator always and forever will feel trapped between the local and the global without finding rest.

The popular romantic myth of a curator is that of the auteur roaming the international art scene without an anchor or maybe even without a port. But the truth of the matter is that even the most independent of curators do belong somewhere. It is actually not even interesting to escape, and the opposite of escaping is to seek out. As a curator a big part of the practice is to seek out and negotiate collaborations. In those negotiations we don’t passively study the field of art, but we take very active part at the same time as we are obliged to try to understand the range and effect of our curating and the curatorial.

Since before the text I read was written, and of course also after, there has been inflation in what I like to call geography exhibitions. Numerous exhibitions have tried to suss out what is “American” or “Eastern European” or “African” or ”Indian”, through looking at contemporary art from these geographies. It is, after all, simple to understand the world merely as a map, as pure geography. Sometimes these exhibitions are made by local curators from the context the exhibition is supposed to talk about [4]. In gloomy and pessimistic moments I ask: is it for financial reasons these exhibitions are commissioned by institutions and accepted by curators? Or is it in the interest of self promotion? In the more positive and optimistic moments I hope: it is because the curator has an undying interest in their immediate surroundings, and a wish to put these surroundings into a broader context.

One approach to this situation of being captured, or an approach to the question if one is indeed captured, came to me this summer [5] one day in a place far away from home, on a different continent even. The next day, sitting in a car driving from an airport to a city on yet another continent, these thoughts came to be handy as I was asked ”Are you an international curator?”. Apart from being surprised by the bluntness of the question, my immediate reaction was to refer to the previous day’s notes: “How to be a non-national curator?” I had jotted down this in my note book: Nasjonal – Internasjonal – Ikkenasjonal. National – International – Non-national. It both sounds and looks good in Norwegian. The idea of non-nationalism indicates escape and flight, but it is at the same time part of a strategy of taking responsibility for a situation that is still with us and was so well described ten years ago: how to avoid being overtaken by the idea of the national? This national agenda can be served to us by a diverse array of structures, be it within the art world or outside of the art world. And the work ahead of us is to not make exhibitions with art and artists because they are from a specific country or region. The term non-national, on the other hand, also indicates expulsion and unwantedness. Nonetheless the curator’s responsibility cannot be addressed in the singular which is non-nationalism, it needs to be looked at in plural; responsibilities, and there are many of them. Two of these responsibilities are insisting on keeping one’s perspective, while at the same time escaping the instrumentality of having an agenda. Because we are free to be partial even when creating and taking part in a cosmopolitan society.

To try to distinguish between having a perspective from having an agenda I have performed a collective activity with colleagues. Thinking about the issues at hand it is interesting to see if and how we are voluntarily or involuntarily captured by the idea of ‘origin’. The context of this text is described by the editors to be curating in Norway. And as we know; just by opening your mouth speaking your mother tongue in this country you are immediately at least regionalised. The follow up question in this culture is more often than not: “where do you come from?” sometimes even with the added “- really?”

I have in different ways discussed issues relating to origin with three colleagues I have been working with during 2008, and as I was asked to write this text I decided to e-mail them the same set of questions, written from my perspective, to see what responses I would get. Linus Elmes is an artist turned curator, turned gallerist, returned artist-curator living in Stockholm, Sweden; Abdellah Karroum is an art researcher and independent curator running several self organised initiatives in Rabat and Fès, Morocco; and Matt Packer is an English curator working in an art and research institution in Cork, Ireland. Below are three diverse, but not necessarily different, approaches to ideas relating to origin and curating.

ASK: What is your first memory of curating, and in what situation was this?

LE: I actually used that very first memory once in a text to exemplify my relation towards curating as an organisation of information more than a physical and logistic experience. The story took place when I was seven years old. My parents just bought a new house and I had no friends in this new village. I decided to make an invitation for a garden party. I used my felt tipped pens to write invitation cards in my room and then I distributed them to all the neighbours. My parents did not know about this operation and was more than surprised when people started to show up dressed for a garden party. But, it took me 25 years to understand that it was curating and not just devilment …

AK: A performance by a monkey, curated by an anonymous man in a weekly public market, the Wednesday Souk in Bentaib, the nearest village from the place where I was born in north Morocco.

MP: I don’t really have a first memory of curating.
When I was about 8 years old, I organised an exhibition in the front room of the house that my parents were renting at the time. I can’t remember the exhibition or what was included, but I do remember developing a stringent security system that involved snooker balls.
I first began thinking about curating through my interest in artists’ books and publications. There have been many parallels drawn between editorial and curatorial practice, and I took these parallels quite seriously when I started on the curatorial programme at Goldsmiths College. I was thinking that I might emerge from the course with a set of interrogative, collaborative publication projects under my arm, which in the end – for whatever reason - didn’t happen.

ASK: What is the most important 'ingredient' for you to start a project? What makes you create?

LE: I am triggered by collaborations and context mostly. Is that an answer?

AK: A good meeting, followed by permanent research and dialogue.

MP: There are no ingredients apart from initial curiosity, and how it develops from there depends on whether I’m working to an institutional mandate. Perhaps the sensible answer to the question is ‘artists’. In my own case, however, there are curatorial projects that involve artistic positions more than they involve artists per se. Secondly, I don’t think ‘artists’ should be thought of as ingredients.

ASK: What in your opinion creates the most resistance in your projects?

LE: I think generally that every project I ever did in the framework of an institution had more friction and resistance than every project initiated outside the institutions, in this case I am also referring to the imaginary ones, those never materialized. (See also next paragraph.)

AK: Creating the space for each project and the translation of the art works to a larger space than the one created.

MP: If I understand the question correctly, the 1st answer is: money. 2nd answer: the various demands of effectiveness.

ASK: Is it possible to describe your curatorial practice: do you have a specific interest? Do you have a specific method? What are you depending on to be able to continue to create?

LE: I am interested in the way institutional structures are manifested and the mechanisms that constitute the institution, the rituals, the language, the uniforms, the codes and all that. My method simply described would be to organize the content and the information in a way that make it transparent by reviling the para-text.

AK: hmmm. If you can describe the art work you can describe the curatorial practice. But if you can not see the art work you can also describe it. It is like in politics. The curator is working to show something existing happened, but not necessarily something produced. I am really interested in art as an activity, and I wish the artists could be acting with the work more than consuming. I am not interested in works that consume more material than they produce of sense or action to change the world. I think dialogue is very important for a curator to continue to create. But sometime dreaming is also a good way, especially when we disagree with our societies.

MP: The work I do in an institutional capacity is different from my independent projects. Without over-generalising, I tend to think this is a necessary and important separation, especially when independent projects are highly-individuated and even characterised; that’s not what public institutions should be promoting.
I have a specific interest in narrative spaces, acts of distribution and the rhetorical export of rock n’ roll. I haven’t signed a lifetime contract as a curator, so I’m not anxious about sustaining these interests under the rubric of curating.

ASK: How does your personal interest/investment in curating affect the institution/structure that you work with, and how does this institution/structure affect your curating?

LE: As you understand from the answer in the last paragraph this is what it is all about, the relation between the self and the assignment. I think revolting is productive and fun…

AK: Very interesting! Very affective, also because I created my actual institution/structure which is, seen from outside, much more independently active from me. My way of curating change spaces unto places and these places affect my curating after I leave for the next expedition... One important problematic is to work both on research and activity, with observation and action. Both positions could be instrumentalised by a structure, or by an institution. In the situation in which we can not be autonomous, the relationship to the institution should be ethically balanced. That means that a curator should be able to create in an interesting artistic sphere, more than take part in developing cultural-touristic productions. So the resistance to the production opportunity needs a real energy and the desire to create a creative space.

MP: I’ve outlined this in the previous answer.

..........
[1] Op. cit. (Latin, short for "opus citatum"/"opera citata", meaning "the work cited/from the cited work") is the term used to provide an endnote or footnote citation to refer the reader to an earlier citation. To find the Op. cit. source, one has to look at the previous footnotes or general references section to find the relevant author.
[2] Ekeberg is trained as a photographer, then turned editor and curator and currently the director of the photography museum Preus museum. Since writing this text Ekeberg has been appointed the new editor of Kunstkritikk.no
[3] Jonas Ekeberg: “I think that between localism and globalism there is urbanism. This is very important to remember: the idea of the city is an interesting way to negotiate this discourse. The city is a place where international, global capitalism has to meet local discourse, where it could be possible to interact and to face real issues.”
http://www.societyofcontrol.com/research/ekeberg.htm
[4] Often they have been commissioned by the likes of museums, art centres etc. Some of these exhibitions are also curated by an “alien” curator, not originally from the geography in question.
[5] 2008

..........
..........
..........

Opus citatum [1] – arbeidet det her er snakk om

I går leste jeg en ti år gammel tekst av Stephan Dillemuth. Han intervjuet Jonas Ekeberg [2] som forsøkte å definere hva som befinner seg mellom det lokale og det globale [3]. Hans svar, sent på nittitallet, var ikke som man kan forvente det nasjonale, men det urbane. Det finnes ikke flere virkelig urbane sentre i Norge nå, som i mangfoldige, altomsluttende, hybride, urolige og livlige sentre, enn det gjorde for ti år siden, og en kan bare anta at den norske kunstneren og kuratoren for alltid vil være fanget mellom dette lokale og globale uten å finne hvile.

Den populære myten er den om kuratoren som den kreative autor som flakker rundt i den internasjonale kunstverdenenen uten anker, og kanskje til og med uten havn. Men sannheten er at selv den mest uavhengige kurator faktisk hører til et sted. Det er ikke en gang interessant å flykte, og det motsatte av å flykte er å oppsøke. Som kurator er dette nettopp en stor del av praksisen, å oppsøke og forhandle samarbeid. I disse forhandlingene er vi ikke passive observatører av et kunstfelt, men veldig aktivt deltagende samtidig som vi er forpliktet til å prøve å forstå rekkevidden av vår egen kuratering og av det kuratoriske.

Siden før den teksten jeg leste ble skrevet, og selvsagt siden, har det vært en inflasjon i det jeg liker å kalle geografiutstillinger. Flerfoldige utstillinger har forsøkt å finne ut av hva som er ”amerikansk” eller ”østeuropeisk” eller ”afrikansk” eller ”indisk”, gjennom å se på samtidskunst fra disse geografiene. Det er, tross alt, enkelt å forstå verden som et kart, som ren geografi. Noen ganger er disse utstillingene også laget av kuratorer som kommer fra den gitte konteksten. I dystre og pessimistiske øyeblikk spør jeg meg om: det er økonomiske hensyn som gjør at institusjoner bestiller slike utstillinger, og at kuratorer aksepterer tilbudet? Eller er det for å fremme seg selv og sitt? I mer positive og optimistiske øyeblikk håper jeg: at det er fordi kuratoren har en levende interesse for sine umiddelbare omgivelser, og et ønske om å plassere dem inn i en større sammenheng.

En mulig måte å nærme seg denne innestengte situasjonen på, eller rettere en måte å nærme seg spørsmålet om dette er en innestengt situasjon, kom til meg en dag i sommer [4] et sted langt hjemmefra, faktisk på et annet kontinent. Og det viste seg at denne tanken kom godt med da jeg dagen etter, på enda et annet kontinent, ble spurt om jeg ”var en internasjonal kurator?” Bortsett fra umiddelbart å bli forfjamset over spørsmålet, refererte jeg tilbake til det jeg hadde skriblet ned i notatboken: ”Hvordan være ikkenasjonal kurator?”, videre var skribleriene Nasjonal – Internasjonal – Ikkenasjonal. Det både ser og høres bra ut. Ideen om ikkenasjonalitet indikerer både rømning og flykt, men er samtidig en del av en metode for å ta ansvar for denne situasjonen som var så godt beskrevet for ti år siden: hvordan unngå å bli innhentet av ideen om det nasjonale? Denne nasjonale agendaen blir servert oss fra mange ulike hold, og kan like gjerne komme innenfra som utenfor kunstfeltet. Oppgaven foran oss er å ikke lage utstillinger med kunst og kunstnere fordi de kommer fra et spesifikt land eller region. På den annen side indikerer også ordet ikkenasjonal både utvisning og det å være uønsket. Likevel kan ikke ansvaret til en kurator omtales i dette entall, ikkenasjonal, det må ses på i flertall; ansvar, og det er mye av det. To ansvar er å insistere på å beholde sitte eget perspektiv, samtidig som man unngår det instrumentelle det er å ha en agenda. For vi er fri til å velge side, selv mens man skaper og tar del i et kosmopolittisk samfunn.

For å prøve å skille mellom det å ha et perspektiv i motsetning til det å ha en agenda har jeg utført en kollektiv aktivitet med kolleger. Når man tenker på disse spørsmålsstillingene er det spennende å undersøke hvordan vi frivillig eller ufrivillig er låst av ideen om opphav. Denne tekstens sammenheng er nemlig beskrevet av redaktørene som en bok om kuratering i Norge. Og som vi alle vet, bare ved å åpne munnen i denne kulturen blir man i den minste regionalisert. Oppfølgingsspørsmålet er nesten alltid ”Hvor kommer du fra?”, gjerne med tillegget ”- egentlig?”

Jeg har i ulike sammenhenger diskutert tema relatert til opphav med tre kolleger jeg jobbet med i løpet av 2008, og da jeg ble spurt om å skrive denne teksten sendte jeg de alle likelydende spørsmål i e-post, forfattet fra mitt perspektiv, for å se hva slags respons jeg ville få. Linus Elmes er opprinnelig kunstner, deretter kurator og gallerist, og nå kunstner-kurator som bor i Stockholm, Sverige, Adbellah Karroum er kunstforsker og uavhengig kurator som driver flere selvorganiserte initiativ i Rabat og Fès, Marokko; og Matt Packer er engelsk kurator som for tiden er tilknyttet en kunst- og forskningsinstitusjon i Cork, Irland. Det følgende er tre mangfoldige, men ikke nødvendigvis ulike, holdninger til opprinnelse og kuratering.

ASK: Hva er ditt første minne av å kuratere, og i hvilken situasjon var det?

LE: Jeg har faktisk brukt dette første minnet en gang tidligere i en tekst for å eksemplifisere mitt forhold til det å kuratere, som mer er å organisere informasjon enn en fysisk og logistisk erfaring. Historien fant sted når jeg var syv år gammel. Mine foreldre hadde nettopp kjøpt et nytt hus, og jeg hadde ingen venner i det nye nabolaget. Jeg bestemte meg for å lage invitasjoner til en hagefest. Jeg satt på rommet mitt og tusjet invitasjoner som deretter ble distribuert til naboene. Foreldrene mine visste ikke noe om påfunnet, og var mer enn overrasket når folk kledd opp til hagefest kom. Men, det tok meg 25 år å forstå at dette var kuratering mer enn ondskapsfullt…

AK: En performance av en ape, kuratert av en anonym mann på et ukentlig offentlig marked, onsdags-souken i Bentaib, nabolandsbyen til det stedet jeg ble født i nordmarokko.

MP: Jeg har egentlig ikke noe første minne av kuratering.
Når jeg var rundt åtte år gammel organiserte jeg en utstilling i stuen i det huset mine foreldre på det tidspunktet leide. Jeg kan ikke huske utstillingen eller hva som var i den, men jeg husker godt at jeg utviklet et stringent sikkerhetssystem som blant annet besto av biljardkuler.
Jeg begynte å tenke på kuratering gjennom min interesse for bøker og publikasjoner laget av kunstnere. Det har vært trukket mange paralleller mellom redaktørens og kuratorens praksis, og jeg tok disse parallellene veldig alvorlig når jeg begynte på kuratorutdannelsen min på Goldsmiths College. Jeg tenkte at jeg skulle komme ut fra utdannelsen med et sett undersøkende samarbeidsprosjekter i bokform, som til slutt – uansett for hvilken grunn – ikke materialiserte seg.

ASK: Hva er den viktigste ingrediensen for at du skal sette i gang et prosjekt? Hva får deg til å skape?

LE: Jeg blir vekket av samarbeider og sammenhenger som oftest. Er det et svar?

AK: Et godt møte, med påfølgende varig undersøkelse og dialog.

MP: Det er ingen ingredienser bortsett fra innledende nysgjerrighet, og hvordan det utvikler seg derfra avhenger av om jeg jobber mot et institusjonelt mandat. Kanskje er en klok måte å svare på dette spørsmålet og si kunstnere. Imidlertid finnes det i mitt tilfelle også kuratoriske prosjekter som involverer kunstneriske posisjoner, mer enn kunstnere som sådan. På den annen side synes jeg ikke at kunstnere skal bli sett på som ingredienser.

ASK: Hva, i din mening, skaper mest motstand i dine prosjekter?

LE: Jeg tror generelt at hvert eneste prosjekt jeg har gjort innenfor rammene til en institusjon har hatt mer friksjon og motstand enn alle de prosjektene jeg har skapt utenfor. Her refererer jeg også til de fingerte, de som aldri materialiserte seg. (Se også neste avsnitt.)

AK: Det å skape åstedet for hvert prosjekt, for deretter å oversette kunstverket til en større sammenheng enn den som er blitt skapt.

MP: Hvis jeg forsår spørsmålet rett så er det første svaret: penger, deretter er det andre svaret: de ulike kravene til effektivitet.

ASK: Er det mulig å beskrive din kuratoriske praksis: har du en spesifikk interesse? Har du en spesifikk metode? Hva er du avhengig av for å være i stand til å fortsette å skape?

LE: Jeg er interessert i den måten institusjonelle strukturer manifesteres og de mekanismer en institusjon består av, ritualene, språket, uniformene, kodene og alt det der. Metoden min, enkelt forklart, er å organisere innholdet og informasjonen på en slik måte at dette blir transparent ved å undergrave para-teksten.

AK: hmmm. Hvis du kan beskrive kunstverket kan du beskrive den kuratoriske praksisen. Men dersom du ikke kan se kunstverket, kan du allikevel beskrive det. Det er som i politikken. Kuratoren arbeider med å vise at noe eksisterende hendte, men ikke nødvendigvis ble produsert. Jeg er virkelig interessert i kunst som aktivitet. Og jeg kunne ønske at kunstnerne kunne spille med verket mer enn å konsumere. Jeg er ikke interessert i verk som forbruker mer materiale enn de produserer av forstand eller handling for å forandre verden. Jeg mener dialog er veldig viktig for at en kurator skal kunne fortsette å skape. Men noen ganger er det å drømme også en god metode, spesielt når vi er uenige med samfunnet rundt oss.

MP: Arbeidet jeg gjør i en institusjonell stilling er veldig ulikt mine uavhengige prosjekter. Uten å trekke generelle slutninger så tror jeg at dette er en nødvendig og viktig oppdeling, særlig siden mine egne prosjekter er personlige og nesten karakteriserende, noe en offentlig institusjon ikke skal fremme.
Jeg har en spesiell interesse for narrative steder, distribusjonshandlinger og rock n’ rolls retorikkeksport. Jeg har ikke signert en livsvarig kontrakt som kurator, så jeg er ikke ivrig etter å beholde disse interessene i en egen kuratoravdeling.

ASK: Hvordan påvirker din personlige interesse/investering i kuratering de institusjonene/strukturene du jobber med, og hvordan påvirker disse institusjonene/strukturene din kuratering?

LE: Som du forstår fra forrige svar så er det dette det handler om, relasjonen mellom selvet og oppgaven. Jeg mener opprør kan være både produktivt og gøy…

AK: Veldig interessant! Veldig stor påvirkning, spesielt siden jeg skapte denne institusjonen/strukturen som, fra utsiden sett, er mye mer uavhengig aktiv enn meg. Min måte å kuratere på omskaper stedet til et åsted, og åstedet påvirker igjen min kuratering når jeg fortsetter til neste ekspedisjon… En viktig problemstilling er å jobbe med både undersøkelse og aktivitet samtidig, med både observasjon og handling. Begge disse posisjonene kan bli instrumentalisert av en struktur, eller en institusjon. I en situasjon der en ikke kan være autonom, bør forholdet til institusjonen være etisk balansert. Med det mener jeg at kuratoren skal være i stand til å skape i en interessant kunstnerisk sfære, mer enn å delta i å utvikle kulturelle turistproduksjoner. Det betyr at motstanden til produksjonsmuligheten trenger en ekte energi og et ønske om å skape dette kreative rommet.

MP: Jeg har svart på det i tidligere svar.

[1]Op cit (latinsk forkortelse for opus citatum, som betyr «det siterte verk») er et uttrykk som brukes i fotnoter for å henvise leseren til et tidligere referert verk. For å finne kilden som Op cit refererer til, må en se på tidligere fotnoter for å finne den aktuelle forfatteren.
[2] Ekeberg er utdannet fotokunstner, og har deretter blitt både redaktør og kurator, og er for tiden direktør på Preus Museum. Etter at denne teksten ble ferdigskrevet er han nyutnevnt redaktør av kunstkritikk.no.
[3] Jonas Ekeberg: “I think that between localism and globalism there is urbanism. This is very important to remember: the idea of the city is an interesting way to negotiate this discourse. The city is a place where international, global capitalism has to meet local discourse, where it could be possible to interact and to face real issues.”
http://www.societyofcontrol.com/research/ekeberg.htm
[4] 2008