Having been asked by Bergen Art Museum to contribute to one of the rooms at the exhibition BGO1 curator Anne Szefer Karlsen has assembled a number of works by artists who in her view have provided significant input to the development of the Bergen art scene during the last ten years. First and foremost, this is a personal presentation, but she hopes the narrative will illuminate the spirit of collaboration and the support network of the Bergen art scene past and present. In addition, it is the story of a growing art scene which may at times seem a bit too confident and uncontroversial. The exhibition Under four metres of ice is a rhetorically broadminded assertion where works of art are placed above and underneath each other. The accompanying text, which bears the same title as the exhibition, is a fictionalized presentation of the same decade, a number of the stories and narratives being tied to both artists and works at the exhibition. The text is not intended to explain or clarify individual works of art, rather, it should be read against the background of the exhibition as a whole. An exhibition where the museum itself is practically removed, as it is covered up, from floor to ceiling.

Participating artists were: Patrik Entian, Pedro Gómez-Egaña, Toril Johannessen, Kjetil Kausland, Annette & Caroline Kierulf, Olaf Knarvik, Arne Skaug Olsen, Aleksander Stav, Sveinung Rudjord Unneland

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN
--- --- ---
--- --- ---

We weren't too sure what we were doing there, the three of us, as we watched the works of one of us. I suppose we were doing a studio visit. One of us was taking an exam. The other two had finished their exams. These two knew this one would do well. This one was slightly tense, wanted to observe the other two as they were looking at this one's work. There was a bit of a discussion. Not much of a discussion, really, that seldom happens. It remains subdued as the three of them realize they will be living with each other for a long time.
---
One of the rooms was large. The room was to become more rooms, but how? How could one room become several rooms? But it did become several rooms. With walls and doors. All of them were soundproofed. Because we must not disturb each other. We needed to support each other. This we did from behind our soundproofed walls, sometimes opening soundproofed doors and supported each other against those soundproofed walls. At times we propped each other up next to the soundproofed walls, as well. But not too often. As the outer walls might collapse.

At one stage we heard an anecdote. Artists on the east coast create smaller works than artists on the west coast. This is simply because those on the west coast have large studios, the size of hangars, while those on the east coast have little studios, or maybe no studio at all. They may have to work at home. They must stay at home, and can't travel. Sometimes the thought crosses my mind that having a large studio need not mean having a physically large room, but that travelling also is a kind of studio: An extended studio, covering the whole world. Which means I no longer have to stay at home. I can be at the studio.
---
Exhibiting art is like confronting the world with itself. But it also means leaving the world we know. It is daydreaming. Sometimes you daydream about big, political gestures. But at other times you daydream about snapping matches. You can also daydream about something which doesn't exist. Something that may never come into existence.

It is nice to daydream within four walls, a floor and a ceiling. And it is nice to daydream in the open air. It is often hard to capture the dreams and hang on to them when you daydream in the open air. Like a balloon salesman at the main square on a national holiday. Anchored to the ground with a tummy full of oatmeal porridge. It may have been a balloon seller from the main square, with a licence to carry arms, who joined a trip to the woods in the east country, near an armament factory, where he shot a wound in the surface. That was how it felt, anyway. This was his way of hanging on to his dreams in his free time. Of course, during his working hours he must hang on to his balloons, and hanging on to balloons with one hand is not compatible with carrying a firearm in the other. Grasping that requires no practical experience.
---
We eventually realized that we didn't have to hang on to balloons and firearms at the same time.
---
There were many shelves and drawers at the chemist's. As well as a few helpful people. One of them approached me, wondering if I required some assistance. I did, having been given a long shopping list. I wanted fifteen packets of gauze, seventy meters of sticking plaster, a syringe with a yellow liquid to stop bleeding so the fight could go on. Knowing full well that only one of us would need all this, I wish my budget had allowed for watertight rectangular compresses for the rest of us. For covering eyes and ears.

Obviously, as travelling by train from here to there takes thirty-one hours, you need something to cover your eyes and ears in order to sleep well. Because none of us could afford a sleeper. As we were about to cross the border, two persons were at the last station before we were Abroad, waving at us. One of them tall, the other short. One hand was outstretched, holding a big food bag which we couldn't catch when the train raced past the platform. The bag was marked 'local produce', and we realized we were leaving our familiar landscape.
---
We were a group of terranauts journeying from a country where the snow falls upwards. We walked about searching for each other, dressed in swim suits and home knitted woolly hats, clinging on to some sort of signal flare which could work under water, as well. Having found each other, we continued searching, as we were convinced there were more of us out there. Under four meters of thick ice and very hopeful of coming across other terranauts who were also walking upside down under water, feet firmly planted on solid ice, and not skidding.
---
It was hot Abroad. We landed in an orangey-yellow sandstorm, our luggage still at the other end of the world. Neither notepad nor accordion arrived in time. As we only stayed there for three days. Seeing nothing, because of the sandstorm. There may have been a large mountain close by the town, just like at home, but we couldn't tell. We couldn't even check the satellite map online. Navigating without getting online was almost impossible. But then we discovered there was no need for the internet, neither when it came to finding our way nor for slaughtering a goat. The locals took care of it.

We prefer slaughtering budgerigars when we have visitors. As this is compatible with the housing cooperative regulations. Anything larger would cause consternation in the neighbourhood. And we cannot risk annoying our neighbours. So we ask nicely, and then we follow instructions. There are strict rules governing the slaughter of budgerigars, but having been inspired by our friends, who don't always abide by rules, we occasionally slaughter goats, as well.

Capturing goats can be tricky, as they always knock the studio about so it becomes larger, and when that happens, the outer walls comes tumbling down. These being the same outer walls as those which were not supposed to collapse. But they do so anyway, at which time someone is at the ready with bandages and syringes, taking notes. They take notes in the journal, making sure all the details about the event are registered. Years ago there were not enough people around who thought writing journals was that important, or so we have been told, so we cannot readily know how the "we's" of those days were treated when the outer walls collapsed. We, who are about to begin; we, who are about to create; we, who are about to think; we, who are about to build; we, who are about to take a break; we, who are about to finish; we, who are about to continue; we ... We.

Translated from the Norwegian by Egil Fredheim

---------
NORSK
---------

Som en respons på utfordringen fra Bergen Kunstmuseum å bidra til et rom i utstillingen BGO1, har kurator Anne Szefer Karlsen samlet en rekke arbeider skapt av kunstnere som hun mener har vært viktige for utviklingen av kunstscenen i Bergen de siste ti årene. Dette er først og fremst en personlig framstilling, men samtidig en fortelling hun håper vil kunne belyse den samarbeidsånden og det støtteapparatet den lokale kunstscenen i Bergen er og har vært. I tillegg er det en fortelling om en voksende kunstscene som mange ganger kan framstå som for trygg og ukontroversiell. Utstillingen Under fire meter tykk is er en retorisk romlig påstand, der kunstverk er plassert over og under hverandre. Teksten, med samme tittel som utstillingen, som følger utstillingen, er en fiksjonalisert framstilling av det samme tiåret, med en rekke historier og fortellinger knyttet opp til både kunstnerne og verkene i utstillingen. Det er ikke meningen at teksten skal forklare eller tydeliggjøre verkene enkeltvis, men være en tekst å lese utstillingen som helhet opp mot. En utstilling der museet selv nærmest er fjernet, ved å tildekkes fra gulv til tak.

Deltagende kunstnere var: Patrik Entian, Pedro Gómez-Egaña, Toril Johannessen, Kjetil Kausland, Annette & Caroline Kierulf, Olaf Knarvik, Arne Skaug Olsen, Aleksander Stav, Sveinung Rudjord Unneland

--- --- ---
--- --- ---

Det var litt usikkert hva vi gjorde der, alle tre, der vi sto og så på den enes arbeider. Det var visst et atelierbesøk. Den ene hadde eksamen. De to andre hadde hatt eksamen. De to visste at den ene kom til å gjøre det bra. Den ene var litt nervøs og ville se på de to mens de to så på den enes arbeid. Det ble en liten diskusjon. Ikke stor, fordi den blir ikke ofte stor. Den forblir liten når de tre vet at de kommer til å leve med hverandre i lang tid framover.
---
Det var ett stort rom. Rommet skulle bli flere rom, men spørsmålet var hvordan. Hvordan skulle ett rom bli flere rom? Men det ble flere rom. Og det ble vegger og dører. Og de ble alle lydisolert. For vi måtte ikke forstyrre hverandre. Vi måtte støtte hverandre. Og det gjorde vi på hver vår side av lydisolerte vegger og noen ganger gikk vi gjennom de lydisolerte dørene og støttet hverandre opp mot de lydisolerte veggene. Noen ganger stilte vi hverandre opp mot de lydisolerte veggene også. Men ikke for ofte. For da kunne ytterveggene rase.

En gang hørte vi en anekdote: Kunstnere på østkysten lager mindre verk enn kunstnere på vestkysten. Ene og alene fordi de på vestkysten har store atelierer, som hangarer, mens de på østkysten har små atelierer, kanskje ikke atelierer i det hele tatt. Kanskje må de være hjemme. De må være hjemme, og kan ikke reise ut. Noen ganger tenker jeg at det å ha et stort atelier ikke bare må være et fysisk stort rom, men at det å reise bort også er et slags atelier: Et utvidet atelier som omfatter hele verden. Og da trenger jeg ikke lenger være hjemme. Jeg kan være på atelieret.
---
Det å vise kunst er å konfrontere verden med seg selv. Men det er også å forlate den verden vi kjenner. Det er å dagdrømme. Noen ganger dagdrømmer man om store politiske gester. Mens andre ganger drømmer man om å knekke fyrstikker. Man kan til og med dagdrømme om noe som ikke finnes. Noe som kanskje aldri kommer til å finnes.
Det er godt å dagdrømme innenfor fire vegger, gulv og tak. Og så er det fint å dagdrømme i friluft. Når man dagdrømmer i friluft er det ofte vanskelig å fange drømmene og holde dem fast. Som en ballongselger på Torgallmenningen på søttende mai. Forankret i jorden med tung rømmegrøt i magen. Det er mulig det var en ballongselger på Torgallmenningen med bæretillatelse som var med ut i skogen på Østlandet i nærheten av en våpenfabrikk og skjøt et sår i overflaten. Det føltes i hvert fall sånn. Det var hans måte å holde fast på dagdrømmene i fritiden. Arbeidstiden måtte jo gå med til å holde ballongene, og det kan ikke forenes å holde en gjeng ballonger med en hånd og et håndvåpen i andre. Det trenger man ikke praktisk erfaring for å forstå.
---
Etter hvert forsto vi at vi ikke trengte å holde både ballonger og håndvåpen samtidig.
---
På apoteket var det mange hyller og mange skuffer. Og en håndfull hjelpsomme mennesker. En kom bort til meg og lurte på om jeg trengte hjelp. Og det gjorde jeg, der jeg sto med en lang handleliste. Jeg trengte femten pakker gassbind, søtti meter plastertape og en sprøyte med noe flytende gult som skulle stoppe mulige blødninger slik at kampen kunne fortsette. Vel vitende om at bare en av oss kom til å trenge dette, skulle jeg ønske jeg hadde budsjett nok til å kjøpe vanntette firkantkompresser til alle oss andre. Til å plastre over øyne og ører.

For det er klart at når man tar toget herfra til dit, og det tar enogtredve timer, trenger man noe til å dekke over øyne og ører for å kunne sove godt. For ingen hadde råd til å ta sovekupé. Når vi skulle krysse grensa sto det to mennesker på siste stasjon før Utlandet og vinket. Den ene var stor, den andre liten. Og den ene hånda strakk fram en stor pose med mat som vi ikke fikk tak i idet toget raste forbi perrongen. Posen var merket med Nærmatlogoen, og vi visste at nå forlot vi det kjente landskapet.
---
Vi kom fra et land der det snør oppover, og vi var en gruppe terranauter på tokt. Vi gikk rundt i badetøy og hjemmestrikkede luer mens vi tviholdt på et slags nødbluss som også kunne fungere under vann, og lette etter hverandre. Og når vi hadde funnet hverandre fortsatte vi å lete, for vi var sikker på at det var flere der ute. Fire meter under tykk is og et stort håp om å treffe på andre terranauter som også gikk opp ned under vann med bena godt plantet på den tykke isen uten å skli.
---
I Utlandet var det varmt. Vi landet i en oransjegul sandstorm, og bagasjen var igjen på andre siden av jorda. Verken notatblokk eller trekkspill kom fram i tide. For vi var der bare i tre dager. Og vi så ingen ting på grunn av sandstormen. Det kunne ha vært et stort fjell rett ved siden av den gamle byen, sånn som hjemme, men det vet vi ikke. Ikke kunne vi se på satellittkartet på internett heller. Det var nesten umulig å navigere uten nettilgang. Men så oppdaget vi at vi ikke trengte internett, verken for å finne veien eller for å slakte en geit. Det tok de lokale seg av.

Selv slakter vi undulater når vi får gjester. Det er kompatibelt med borettslagsleiligheter. Noe større ville vekket ergrelse blant naboene. Og vi kan jo ikke risikere at naboen blir plaget. Derfor spør vi pent først, og så utfører vi etter instruks. Det er strenge regler for hvordan undulater skal slaktes, men inspirert av våre venner som ikke alltid følger reglene, så slakter også vi geiter innimellom.

Geitene er vanskelige å fange siden de alltid klarer å stange atelieret større, og når atelieret blir større så raser ytterveggene. Det er de samme ytterveggene som tidligere ikke skulle rase. Men så gjør de det allikevel, og da står det noen klar med bandasje og sprøyte og tar notater. De tar notater i journalen for å passe på at alle detaljer rundt forløpet er registrert. I gamle dager fantes det ikke nok mennesker som mente at det å skrive journal var viktig, er vi blitt fortalt, så det er vanskelig å vite hvordan det som var ”vi” den gangen ble tatt imot når ytterveggene raste. Vi som skal starte, vi som skal skape, vi som skal tenke, vi som skal utfordre, vi som skal bygge, vi som skal hvile, vi som skal slutte, vi som skal fortsette, vi… Vi.

Having been asked by Bergen Art Museum to contribute to one of the rooms at the exhibition BGO1 curator Anne Szefer Karlsen has assembled a number of works by artists who in her view have provided significant input to the development of the Bergen art scene during the last ten years. First and foremost, this is a personal presentation, but she hopes the narrative will illuminate the spirit of collaboration and the support network of the Bergen art scene past and present. In addition, it is the story of a growing art scene which may at times seem a bit too confident and uncontroversial. The exhibition Under four metres of ice is a rhetorically broadminded assertion where works of art are placed above and underneath each other. The accompanying text, which bears the same title as the exhibition, is a fictionalized presentation of the same decade, a number of the stories and narratives being tied to both artists and works at the exhibition. The text is not intended to explain or clarify individual works of art, rather, it should be read against the background of the exhibition as a whole. An exhibition where the museum itself is practically removed, as it is covered up, from floor to ceiling.

Participating artists were: Patrik Entian, Pedro Gómez-Egaña, Toril Johannessen, Kjetil Kausland, Annette & Caroline Kierulf, Olaf Knarvik, Arne Skaug Olsen, Aleksander Stav, Sveinung Rudjord Unneland

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR NORWEGIAN
--- --- ---
--- --- ---

We weren't too sure what we were doing there, the three of us, as we watched the works of one of us. I suppose we were doing a studio visit. One of us was taking an exam. The other two had finished their exams. These two knew this one would do well. This one was slightly tense, wanted to observe the other two as they were looking at this one's work. There was a bit of a discussion. Not much of a discussion, really, that seldom happens. It remains subdued as the three of them realize they will be living with each other for a long time.
---
One of the rooms was large. The room was to become more rooms, but how? How could one room become several rooms? But it did become several rooms. With walls and doors. All of them were soundproofed. Because we must not disturb each other. We needed to support each other. This we did from behind our soundproofed walls, sometimes opening soundproofed doors and supported each other against those soundproofed walls. At times we propped each other up next to the soundproofed walls, as well. But not too often. As the outer walls might collapse.

At one stage we heard an anecdote. Artists on the east coast create smaller works than artists on the west coast. This is simply because those on the west coast have large studios, the size of hangars, while those on the east coast have little studios, or maybe no studio at all. They may have to work at home. They must stay at home, and can't travel. Sometimes the thought crosses my mind that having a large studio need not mean having a physically large room, but that travelling also is a kind of studio: An extended studio, covering the whole world. Which means I no longer have to stay at home. I can be at the studio.
---
Exhibiting art is like confronting the world with itself. But it also means leaving the world we know. It is daydreaming. Sometimes you daydream about big, political gestures. But at other times you daydream about snapping matches. You can also daydream about something which doesn't exist. Something that may never come into existence.

It is nice to daydream within four walls, a floor and a ceiling. And it is nice to daydream in the open air. It is often hard to capture the dreams and hang on to them when you daydream in the open air. Like a balloon salesman at the main square on a national holiday. Anchored to the ground with a tummy full of oatmeal porridge. It may have been a balloon seller from the main square, with a licence to carry arms, who joined a trip to the woods in the east country, near an armament factory, where he shot a wound in the surface. That was how it felt, anyway. This was his way of hanging on to his dreams in his free time. Of course, during his working hours he must hang on to his balloons, and hanging on to balloons with one hand is not compatible with carrying a firearm in the other. Grasping that requires no practical experience.
---
We eventually realized that we didn't have to hang on to balloons and firearms at the same time.
---
There were many shelves and drawers at the chemist's. As well as a few helpful people. One of them approached me, wondering if I required some assistance. I did, having been given a long shopping list. I wanted fifteen packets of gauze, seventy meters of sticking plaster, a syringe with a yellow liquid to stop bleeding so the fight could go on. Knowing full well that only one of us would need all this, I wish my budget had allowed for watertight rectangular compresses for the rest of us. For covering eyes and ears.

Obviously, as travelling by train from here to there takes thirty-one hours, you need something to cover your eyes and ears in order to sleep well. Because none of us could afford a sleeper. As we were about to cross the border, two persons were at the last station before we were Abroad, waving at us. One of them tall, the other short. One hand was outstretched, holding a big food bag which we couldn't catch when the train raced past the platform. The bag was marked 'local produce', and we realized we were leaving our familiar landscape.
---
We were a group of terranauts journeying from a country where the snow falls upwards. We walked about searching for each other, dressed in swim suits and home knitted woolly hats, clinging on to some sort of signal flare which could work under water, as well. Having found each other, we continued searching, as we were convinced there were more of us out there. Under four meters of thick ice and very hopeful of coming across other terranauts who were also walking upside down under water, feet firmly planted on solid ice, and not skidding.
---
It was hot Abroad. We landed in an orangey-yellow sandstorm, our luggage still at the other end of the world. Neither notepad nor accordion arrived in time. As we only stayed there for three days. Seeing nothing, because of the sandstorm. There may have been a large mountain close by the town, just like at home, but we couldn't tell. We couldn't even check the satellite map online. Navigating without getting online was almost impossible. But then we discovered there was no need for the internet, neither when it came to finding our way nor for slaughtering a goat. The locals took care of it.

We prefer slaughtering budgerigars when we have visitors. As this is compatible with the housing cooperative regulations. Anything larger would cause consternation in the neighbourhood. And we cannot risk annoying our neighbours. So we ask nicely, and then we follow instructions. There are strict rules governing the slaughter of budgerigars, but having been inspired by our friends, who don't always abide by rules, we occasionally slaughter goats, as well.

Capturing goats can be tricky, as they always knock the studio about so it becomes larger, and when that happens, the outer walls comes tumbling down. These being the same outer walls as those which were not supposed to collapse. But they do so anyway, at which time someone is at the ready with bandages and syringes, taking notes. They take notes in the journal, making sure all the details about the event are registered. Years ago there were not enough people around who thought writing journals was that important, or so we have been told, so we cannot readily know how the "we's" of those days were treated when the outer walls collapsed. We, who are about to begin; we, who are about to create; we, who are about to think; we, who are about to build; we, who are about to take a break; we, who are about to finish; we, who are about to continue; we ... We.

Translated from the Norwegian by Egil Fredheim

---------
NORSK
---------

Som en respons på utfordringen fra Bergen Kunstmuseum å bidra til et rom i utstillingen BGO1, har kurator Anne Szefer Karlsen samlet en rekke arbeider skapt av kunstnere som hun mener har vært viktige for utviklingen av kunstscenen i Bergen de siste ti årene. Dette er først og fremst en personlig framstilling, men samtidig en fortelling hun håper vil kunne belyse den samarbeidsånden og det støtteapparatet den lokale kunstscenen i Bergen er og har vært. I tillegg er det en fortelling om en voksende kunstscene som mange ganger kan framstå som for trygg og ukontroversiell. Utstillingen Under fire meter tykk is er en retorisk romlig påstand, der kunstverk er plassert over og under hverandre. Teksten, med samme tittel som utstillingen, som følger utstillingen, er en fiksjonalisert framstilling av det samme tiåret, med en rekke historier og fortellinger knyttet opp til både kunstnerne og verkene i utstillingen. Det er ikke meningen at teksten skal forklare eller tydeliggjøre verkene enkeltvis, men være en tekst å lese utstillingen som helhet opp mot. En utstilling der museet selv nærmest er fjernet, ved å tildekkes fra gulv til tak.

Deltagende kunstnere var: Patrik Entian, Pedro Gómez-Egaña, Toril Johannessen, Kjetil Kausland, Annette & Caroline Kierulf, Olaf Knarvik, Arne Skaug Olsen, Aleksander Stav, Sveinung Rudjord Unneland

--- --- ---
--- --- ---

Det var litt usikkert hva vi gjorde der, alle tre, der vi sto og så på den enes arbeider. Det var visst et atelierbesøk. Den ene hadde eksamen. De to andre hadde hatt eksamen. De to visste at den ene kom til å gjøre det bra. Den ene var litt nervøs og ville se på de to mens de to så på den enes arbeid. Det ble en liten diskusjon. Ikke stor, fordi den blir ikke ofte stor. Den forblir liten når de tre vet at de kommer til å leve med hverandre i lang tid framover.
---
Det var ett stort rom. Rommet skulle bli flere rom, men spørsmålet var hvordan. Hvordan skulle ett rom bli flere rom? Men det ble flere rom. Og det ble vegger og dører. Og de ble alle lydisolert. For vi måtte ikke forstyrre hverandre. Vi måtte støtte hverandre. Og det gjorde vi på hver vår side av lydisolerte vegger og noen ganger gikk vi gjennom de lydisolerte dørene og støttet hverandre opp mot de lydisolerte veggene. Noen ganger stilte vi hverandre opp mot de lydisolerte veggene også. Men ikke for ofte. For da kunne ytterveggene rase.

En gang hørte vi en anekdote: Kunstnere på østkysten lager mindre verk enn kunstnere på vestkysten. Ene og alene fordi de på vestkysten har store atelierer, som hangarer, mens de på østkysten har små atelierer, kanskje ikke atelierer i det hele tatt. Kanskje må de være hjemme. De må være hjemme, og kan ikke reise ut. Noen ganger tenker jeg at det å ha et stort atelier ikke bare må være et fysisk stort rom, men at det å reise bort også er et slags atelier: Et utvidet atelier som omfatter hele verden. Og da trenger jeg ikke lenger være hjemme. Jeg kan være på atelieret.
---
Det å vise kunst er å konfrontere verden med seg selv. Men det er også å forlate den verden vi kjenner. Det er å dagdrømme. Noen ganger dagdrømmer man om store politiske gester. Mens andre ganger drømmer man om å knekke fyrstikker. Man kan til og med dagdrømme om noe som ikke finnes. Noe som kanskje aldri kommer til å finnes.
Det er godt å dagdrømme innenfor fire vegger, gulv og tak. Og så er det fint å dagdrømme i friluft. Når man dagdrømmer i friluft er det ofte vanskelig å fange drømmene og holde dem fast. Som en ballongselger på Torgallmenningen på søttende mai. Forankret i jorden med tung rømmegrøt i magen. Det er mulig det var en ballongselger på Torgallmenningen med bæretillatelse som var med ut i skogen på Østlandet i nærheten av en våpenfabrikk og skjøt et sår i overflaten. Det føltes i hvert fall sånn. Det var hans måte å holde fast på dagdrømmene i fritiden. Arbeidstiden måtte jo gå med til å holde ballongene, og det kan ikke forenes å holde en gjeng ballonger med en hånd og et håndvåpen i andre. Det trenger man ikke praktisk erfaring for å forstå.
---
Etter hvert forsto vi at vi ikke trengte å holde både ballonger og håndvåpen samtidig.
---
På apoteket var det mange hyller og mange skuffer. Og en håndfull hjelpsomme mennesker. En kom bort til meg og lurte på om jeg trengte hjelp. Og det gjorde jeg, der jeg sto med en lang handleliste. Jeg trengte femten pakker gassbind, søtti meter plastertape og en sprøyte med noe flytende gult som skulle stoppe mulige blødninger slik at kampen kunne fortsette. Vel vitende om at bare en av oss kom til å trenge dette, skulle jeg ønske jeg hadde budsjett nok til å kjøpe vanntette firkantkompresser til alle oss andre. Til å plastre over øyne og ører.

For det er klart at når man tar toget herfra til dit, og det tar enogtredve timer, trenger man noe til å dekke over øyne og ører for å kunne sove godt. For ingen hadde råd til å ta sovekupé. Når vi skulle krysse grensa sto det to mennesker på siste stasjon før Utlandet og vinket. Den ene var stor, den andre liten. Og den ene hånda strakk fram en stor pose med mat som vi ikke fikk tak i idet toget raste forbi perrongen. Posen var merket med Nærmatlogoen, og vi visste at nå forlot vi det kjente landskapet.
---
Vi kom fra et land der det snør oppover, og vi var en gruppe terranauter på tokt. Vi gikk rundt i badetøy og hjemmestrikkede luer mens vi tviholdt på et slags nødbluss som også kunne fungere under vann, og lette etter hverandre. Og når vi hadde funnet hverandre fortsatte vi å lete, for vi var sikker på at det var flere der ute. Fire meter under tykk is og et stort håp om å treffe på andre terranauter som også gikk opp ned under vann med bena godt plantet på den tykke isen uten å skli.
---
I Utlandet var det varmt. Vi landet i en oransjegul sandstorm, og bagasjen var igjen på andre siden av jorda. Verken notatblokk eller trekkspill kom fram i tide. For vi var der bare i tre dager. Og vi så ingen ting på grunn av sandstormen. Det kunne ha vært et stort fjell rett ved siden av den gamle byen, sånn som hjemme, men det vet vi ikke. Ikke kunne vi se på satellittkartet på internett heller. Det var nesten umulig å navigere uten nettilgang. Men så oppdaget vi at vi ikke trengte internett, verken for å finne veien eller for å slakte en geit. Det tok de lokale seg av.

Selv slakter vi undulater når vi får gjester. Det er kompatibelt med borettslagsleiligheter. Noe større ville vekket ergrelse blant naboene. Og vi kan jo ikke risikere at naboen blir plaget. Derfor spør vi pent først, og så utfører vi etter instruks. Det er strenge regler for hvordan undulater skal slaktes, men inspirert av våre venner som ikke alltid følger reglene, så slakter også vi geiter innimellom.

Geitene er vanskelige å fange siden de alltid klarer å stange atelieret større, og når atelieret blir større så raser ytterveggene. Det er de samme ytterveggene som tidligere ikke skulle rase. Men så gjør de det allikevel, og da står det noen klar med bandasje og sprøyte og tar notater. De tar notater i journalen for å passe på at alle detaljer rundt forløpet er registrert. I gamle dager fantes det ikke nok mennesker som mente at det å skrive journal var viktig, er vi blitt fortalt, så det er vanskelig å vite hvordan det som var ”vi” den gangen ble tatt imot når ytterveggene raste. Vi som skal starte, vi som skal skape, vi som skal tenke, vi som skal utfordre, vi som skal bygge, vi som skal hvile, vi som skal slutte, vi som skal fortsette, vi… Vi.